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Shanghai: 1990 vs. 2010

Shanghai: 1990 vs. 2010 | Education in the world | Scoop.it

Globalization has hit...hard and fast. 


Via Seth Dixon
Crissy Borton's insight:

It looks like a completely different city. Sadly you can no longer see any green.

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Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 11:02 PM

Shanghai could arguably be the best example of globalization in the world today. In the span of 20 years, it has gone from a sparse city with some commerce on the river to a major urban center with the skyscrapers and neon lights. The transformation between the two images is staggering and it's easy to see the resemblance between current day Shanghai and it's partner globalized cities like New York and Seoul.

Cam E's curator insight, April 8, 11:23 AM

Apart from what can be said about the process of Globalization, this is just impressive under the lens of what can be done in 20 years to change the skylines and landscapes of an area. Notice the lack of vegetation in the second picture, and while it may just be an effect of the different time of day or season, they sky seems a lot more fogged in the second picture, possibly due to pollution.

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 14, 6:35 PM

Shanghai has transformed and globalized so quickly in the last twenty years that it doesn't even look like that same place. Skies that were once seen are now blocked by skyscrapers. Buildings that still remain are overpowered and do not stand out like they once did.

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Tsunami of Change Hitting Burma!

Sometimes the news can be good news! The historic April 1st election in Burma that saw Aung San Suu Kyi and her National League for Democracy win 43/45 parliamentary seats is being hailed as the first free and fair elections for 50 years!

 

This is a current perspective on the many changes transforming Myanmar back into Burma.  For more by John Boyer, see: http://www.plaidavenger.com/ ;


Via Seth Dixon
Crissy Borton's insight:

Wow I think this guy may have drank way to much coffee before making this video J  He is very excited about the changes in Burma although he should be it sounds as though this country is pretty much changing overnight

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Al Picozzi's curator insight, November 26, 2013 11:02 AM

It is amazing to see the kind of changes he has mentioned especially after military rule for about 50 years.  But you have to be careful as in all things.  Look at this article from BBC news http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-pacific-12990563 Even though the changes have been made the military still holds some significant power.  It holds the most powerful ministires in the country and well as having 25%of the seats of both chambers of the parliament reserved for themselves.  In time if these restricitions are removed I think that sanctions could be removed a little at a time.

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Break Dancing, Phnom Penh-Style

Break Dancing, Phnom Penh-Style | Education in the world | Scoop.it
A former gang member from Long Beach, California, teaches break dancing to at-risk youth in Cambodia.

 

This video is a great example of cross-cultural interactions in the era of globalization.  Urban youth culture of the United States is spread to Cambodia through a former refugee (with a personally complex political geography).  What geographic themes are evident in this video? How is geography being reshaped and by what forces?


Via Seth Dixon
Crissy Borton's insight:

A very positive video but I would like to know how KK was able to come clean of drugs (I assume he did them in California). I would also like to know what made him decided to change for the better.

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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 18, 5:43 PM

This man was originally from California, but was kicked out of America and now lives in Cambodia. “KK” introduces break dancing, rapping and even taught basic computer skills to the at risk children of Cambodia. The children are some of the best break-dancers I have ever seen. A man by the name of "KK" inspired and gave the youth of Cambodia hope. 

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 1, 11:00 AM

Bringing different cultures into different lifestyles is an important part of cultural history. Every culture is linked in some way to another one. What this break dancer does to help these kids is awesome. As a former Cambodian refugee he had never been to Cambodia but was sent back there. His L.A./past gang influences have helped many kids to stay away from gangs and to take up schooling and break dancing instead.

Paige Therien's curator insight, May 2, 3:05 PM

Urban United States culture has been introduced to Cambodia's youth by K.K.  K.K., who lived in California his whole life as the child of Cambodian refugees, was deported to Cambodia, a place he had never even visited before, due to a felony charge.  K.K created an organization which taught Cambodia's youth about HIV protection, computers, and drugs.  He made his organization attractive to Cambodian youth by introducing them break-dancing and rapping.  In the U.S. these activities are often viewed in a negative light, but K.K. used them positively by introducing them to a population with no prior knowledge of them.  He also recreated his own identity by mixing his new, vastly unknown Cambodian experience with his life experiences from the U.S.   He is an example of the many people who struggle with forming a more global identity in our global world.  This organization targets at-risk kids and K.K. is probably trying to direct their lives the way he may wish someone had done for him. 

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Six-Legged Giant Finds Secret Hideaway, Hides For 80 Years

Six-Legged Giant Finds Secret Hideaway, Hides For 80 Years | Education in the world | Scoop.it
The insect is so large — as big as a human hand — it's been dubbed a "tree lobster." It was thought to be extinct, but some enterprising entomologists scoured a barren hunk of rock in the middle of the ocean and found surviving Lord Howe Island...

 

Island Biogeography is endlessly fascinating and provides some of the most striking species we have on Earth.  The physical habitat is fragmented and the genetic diversity is limited.  Within this context, species evolve to fill ecological niches within their particular locale.  This NPR article demonstrates the story of but one of these incredible species that never could have evolved on the continents.  In modern society, more extinctions are happening on islands than anywhere else as 'specialist' species are in greater competition with 'generalists.' 


Via Seth Dixon
Crissy Borton's insight:

The tree lobsters are very creepy. I wonder how they got to the island. Although I would not want one anywhere near me I am glad they are thriving…far away

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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 5:56 PM

When reading I found out that they call it "Ball's Pyramid"because that is what is left from the last volcano that emerged from the sea about 7 million years ago."British naval officer named Ball was the first European to see it in 1788. It sits off Australia, in the South Pacific. It is extremely narrow, 1,844 feet high, and it sits alone.

What's more, for years this place had a secret. At 225 feet above sea level, hanging on the rock surface, there is a small, spindly little bush, and under that bush, a few years ago, two climbers, working in the dark, found something totally improbable hiding in the soil below. How it got there, we still don't know."

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 24, 8:33 PM

This article freeked me out at first.  The idea of hand sized bugs is just…yuck!  But after reading the article I found it very interesting.  That these bugs managed to survive on a single bush on an island isolated from the world.  The description of them as acting un-buglike by peering off into couples that sleep cuddling with each other is just kind of cool.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 25, 10:35 AM

On Ball's Pyramid the stick insect is different than any other insect I have seen. The size of it is terrifying, as it as big as a human hand. There are many different kinds of animals or insects someone can find on remote islands, islands such as Madagascar, Australia and even on this small island, which is located off of Australia's coast in the Pacific.    

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Lurking in the Deep

Lurking in the Deep | Education in the world | Scoop.it
Divers on Australia's Great Barrier Reef recently snapped rare pictures of a wobbegong, or carpet shark, swallowing a bamboo shark whole.

 

The diversity of life on this planet and the ecosystems which such creatures live in is something that continually leaves me in awe at the wonders of the natural world.


Via Seth Dixon
Crissy Borton's insight:

The diversity in the ocean is amazing.  The sharks are just beautiful and it is amazing the can blend in with their enviroment

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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 5:41 PM

When I first saw this image I thought that this white shark was swimming into a chest or something anything except for another shark. Then when opening the article it was apparent that the shark was being eaten by another shark. 

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 23, 5:57 PM

A wobbegong, also known as the carpet shark, engulfs a bamboo shark in the Great Barrier Reef. This was a surprising and rare photo for Divers in Australia. It is crazy how animals so close in relativity can instantly become predators, and possibly a meal, to each other!

Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, September 1, 10:38 AM

This article reminds me of another video i've seen recently of a grouper fish swallowing a 4-foot black tip shark whole. A fisherman caught that on camera while trying to reel in the shark. Time and time again I'm reminded that not everything in nature is as it seems and that the unexpected should be expected. 

This makes me want to buy some scuba gear and take some diving classes, I ought to conquer my fear of sharks by safely observing them with a research team! 

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China now eats twice the meat we do

China now eats twice the meat we do | Education in the world | Scoop.it
We can learn a lot from examining the way China's diet has changed in the last 20 years -- as well as its required efficiencies and the agriculture that supports it.

 

The United States still consumes more meat per capita than China, but as China's economy has grown (along with it's income and standard of living), the consumer habits have changed as well.  What will the impacts of the rise in Chinese meat consumption mean?   How do they get all this meat?  http://www.scoop.it/t/geography-education/p/1661841673/this-little-piggy-is-going-to-china


Via Seth Dixon
Crissy Borton's insight:

I wonder if this will bring on a meat shortage. At the least it is helping to full "factory" farmer and the feeding on cheep corn to cows. I wonder how much this will effect global warming.

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Seth Dixon's comment, July 25, 2012 8:09 PM
As more societies aspire to 'American lifestyles,' consuming meat goes up. As a country gets wealthier, their capacity to have a meat market expands. But China is so big, that shift is actually a big deal.
Brett Sinica's curator insight, November 29, 2013 2:07 PM

This is actuallty very believable considering the population growth that China has experienced.  It only makes sense that the more people there are, the more meat will be consumed.  It is part of their cuisine to include meat.  Pork and chicken are among many of the popular proteins which are found on their dishes.  There is also the expansion to go along with all of the growth.  The landscape of the eastern part of the country has become more agriculturally accomodating for crops and livestock alike.  Therefore to match the trend of growing population, is the need to match it with meat and other foods.

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 14, 6:25 PM

China now eats twice as much meat than America. However, this chart does not touch upon "per-capita" which plays a major role in where the food is being dispersed and consumed. 

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Over 27 and unmarried? In China, you’re an old maid

Over 27 and unmarried? In China, you’re an old maid | Education in the world | Scoop.it
January and February are sweet times for most Chinese — they enjoy family reunions during the spring festival, which this year fell on January 23, and they celebrate Valentine’s Day, which is well-liked in China.

 

Gender roles in cultural norms change from country to country.  What also needs to be understood is how the demographic situation of a given country influences these patterns. 


Via Seth Dixon
Crissy Borton's insight:

Seeing as how they have more men then women I am surprised they are not all married way before 27.

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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 9, 2013 1:22 PM

It is hard for Chinese women to attract men once they reach a certain age in Beijing it was reported in 2009 that there was 800,000 women 27 and unmarried and the number was rising. Many mothers of these women even argue with them or try to set them up with men they dont like. In the US women are getting married older and older and it is viewed as socially acceptable mainly because they are focusing on their carrers and making sure they are settled first. 

Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, October 21, 2013 1:05 PM

This article is interesting as it discusses one example of how gender roles and cultural norms differ from country to country.  Chinese women who are around 30 years old and single are referred to as "leftover girls".  Similar to a growing trend in the United States, Chinese women are focusing on their careers and their own goals and waiting to marry until they find the right person and have their own lives in order.  However, in the United States, this way of life for women is more socially acceptable whereas in China, it is not as acceptable for these "leftover girls".

Marissa Roy's curator insight, December 5, 2013 1:32 PM

It is interesting to see this as in American culture, marrying in your 20s is not a necessity anymore, it's almost unexpected. With so many men to choose from, these girls have time to find a man. The culture is going to shift as these ladies get married later in life.

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Al Jazeera-Nepal's Forest Future

Al Jazeera-Nepal's Forest Future | Education in the world | Scoop.it
In Nepal, government owned forests are being felled at record speed, while community managed ones are thriving.

 

This is a great link for discussing governance and the environmental interactions and community.   


Via Seth Dixon
Crissy Borton's insight:

This is a great example of how communities can help themselves and their land. It works because the people live there and they have to not only think about today but tomorrow so they do not exploit their recourses

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Don Brown Jr's comment, July 30, 2012 10:55 PM
Investing in the environment is a very beneficial way to promote sustainability in an increasingly urbanized world and a cheap way to increase air quality.
Al Picozzi's curator insight, November 13, 2013 12:07 AM

This shows want can be done to help preserve some of the natural habitat that we all need to live.  While the government lands are being used, illegally, though the government does nothing to stop it becasue of the economic stimulus it provides the lands given too the commnity are surviving and actually striving.  So why can't something like this be done in the Brazilian rain forest.  Set some of it aside to the community so they can maintain it, let it grow so that one of the most important natural resoures on this planet just doesn'tend up as ashes.

Paige McClatchy's curator insight, December 14, 2013 5:00 PM

The deforestation of Nepal to supply the growing needs of India is an example of how growth in one country strips another of its resources. While Nepal may gain in the short term form logging away their forests, deforestation has steep long term costs. Many people live off the forests and their disappearance could threaten to ruin their culture.

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Pakistan Trees Cocooned in Spider Webs

Pakistan Trees Cocooned in Spider Webs | Education in the world | Scoop.it
Documented by an aid worker, millions of spiders took to the trees to spin their webs after heavy floods inundated Pakistan in 2010.

 

Besides being an aesthetic wonder, this image is a great way to start a discussion about so many distinct issues. The floods of 2010 devastated the human population, killing over 2,000. These same floods also altered the ecosystem as spiders have needed to adapt to their new inundated landscape as well. For the human population, this has had the shocking benefit of lowering the incidents of malaria since the spiders have more effectively limited the mosquito population. Interconnections...geographic information are a spider web of interconnections between nature and humanity.


Via Seth Dixon
Crissy Borton's insight:

I thought that was such a beautiful picture until I learned the tree was covered in spider webs and then it creeped me out. However it is such a good thing for the people there. Those webs will help trap the diseased mesquites. 

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Matt Mallinson's comment, November 7, 2012 3:29 PM
This is crazy! It's a great thing that the spiders help by eating the disease filled mosquitos....but i still hate spiders.
Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, November 14, 2013 9:09 AM

This National Geographic photo is interesting as it shows spider webs wrapped around trees during the 2010 floods in Pakistan.  While it may seem weird or gross to some, the fact that there were spider webs in the trees is actually very important in a geographical context because spiders eat mosquitos, meaning the incidents of malaria were lowered during this time.

Cam E's curator insight, April 1, 11:07 AM

As cool as it is creepy. I'm reminded of entire fields of spider webs after similar heavy flooding in Australia. I certainty would get nowhere near those trees if this were to happen locally.

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India's Census: Lots Of Cellphones, Too Few Toilets

The results of India's once-in-a-decade census reveal a country of 1.2 billion people where millions have access to the latest technology, but millions more lack sanitation and drinking water.

 

More Indians are entering the middle class as personal wealth is transforming South Asia's economy in the private sector.  Yet the government's ability to provide public services to match that growth still lags behind.  Why would it be that it is easier to get a cell phone than a toilet in India?  What will that mean for development?  


Via Seth Dixon
Crissy Borton's insight:

This reminds me of the childhood lessen about the difference between a need and a want. Instead of cell phones people should come together to help the government put in a sewer system. It is far more important than owning a cell phone or TV

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Paige Therien's curator insight, April 17, 1:41 PM

India's economy is transforming, but only for individuals, who are quickly becoming rich or, more commonly, part of the growing middle class.  This change, mixed with a corrupt, non-incentivized  government is creating a picture of uneven development in India.  The government is not supplying basic needs to the growing population, which mainly effects the poor.  Half of the population are lacking basic sanitation and access to clean water.  These needs can only be met with a strong infrastructure, which the government has neither the money nor the motivation to rebuild.  However, Indians do have the access to things like cellphones and televisions.  This is due to the fact that these goods are privatized and easy to obtain (as opposed to ripping apart a city to put infrastructure in place).  So, uneven development is seen not only in the general economy, but also in access to resources and material goods. 

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, June 17, 6:42 AM

Consequences of urbanisation

Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 30, 10:36 PM

More Indians are entering the middle class as personal wealth is transforming South Asia's economy in the private sector.  Yet the government's ability to provide public services to match that growth still lags behind.  Why would it be that it is easier to get a cell phone than a toilet in India?  What will that mean for development in India?  These comedians are seeking to use humor to bring this issue to light.

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The world map of chocolate (made out of chocolate)

The world map of chocolate (made out of chocolate) | Education in the world | Scoop.it
You may be focussing on chocolate over the weekend - but where does it come from? A global trade analysed. In chocolate (this is what maps are made for!

 

What is the geography of chocolate like?  There is a dark side (no pun intended) to the production of cocoa in many places such as West Africa. 


Via Seth Dixon
Crissy Borton's insight:

Very cool map. I have never really paid attention to where my chocolate came from before. 

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Matt Mallinson's comment, November 5, 2012 2:13 PM
I love chocolate but I agree with Don, nobody knows the "behind the scenes" of making this delicious treat. It stays behind doors very successfully that the majority of the public will never know exactly where and how they get their chocolate.
ethne staniland's curator insight, May 16, 2013 11:33 AM

Interesting for our KS1 chocolate topic.

Brett Sinica's curator insight, November 10, 2013 5:43 PM

We all love chocolate.  We all love diamonds and jewels.  In western worlds, these items are easily come by in grocery stores and elsewhere, but what got them there was a challenge.  People in poorer tropical regions around the world worked to get the raw goods of these delicate items we all enjoy.  The payout difference is immense from cocoa to chocolate.  It is sometimes a very crooked market where if it wasn't for the hard working people who get the raw ingredients, chocolate as we know it wouldn't be the same.

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AIDS/HIV Video: Development and Disease

Justine Ojambo, co-founder of the SLF-funded project PEFO in Uganda, talks about losing his mother to AIDS and PEFO's work to support children orphaned by AI...

 

THis is a great video on AIDS/HIV in Africa.  So many show Africans as passive victims of global and environmental forces beyond their control, this one is of empowered and inspiring people seeking to change the world.  For more inspiration AIDS/HIVS videos from Africa, see: http://stephenlewisfoundation.org/news-resources/multimedia/video-clips


Via Seth Dixon
Crissy Borton's insight:

One thing that stuck out to me in this video is when he spoke about the making sure the children’s basic needs are met so they can concentrate on school. That is such a problem in our education system today that people don’t wish to address. I wonder how our education system would be if we made sure our children also had their basic needs met.

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Peter Siner's comment, November 16, 2011 10:08 PM
it seems as though there is little we can do to help help end this horrible plague in africa besides donate money or food , relgion is such a huge factor in their decision making process
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Religious Pilgrimage: the Hajj

Religious Pilgrimage: the Hajj | Education in the world | Scoop.it

This is a beautiful photoessay of the Hajj, with excellent captions that shows many of the cultural customs that are associated with the massive pilgrimage.  The tremendous influx of tourists/pilgrims into the Mecca area, there is a huge economic industry that supports and depends on the tourists.  For a BBC article about the market impacts of the Hajj, see: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-11777483


Via Seth Dixon
Crissy Borton's insight:

These photo’s are amazing! Number 12 with the crowd of people and the ambulance in the middle shows the massive amount of people. Their heads look like dots in a sea of white. These pictures show what words just cannot describe. 

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Elizabeth Allen's comment, December 6, 2012 11:21 PM
The photos show what an immense congregation this event really is. If a picture is worth a thoudsand words, than this collection is a jackpot. The colors are captivating, green costumes of participants in the military parade, the hands holding the beads for sale. In the article from bbc.co.uk it is interesting to learn that such a religious event is an opportunity for economic gains. From merchants selling beads and rugs to visitors all the way to hotels capitalizing on the religious pilgrimage. It is amazing to know that every Muslim should make this trip as long as he/she is healthy and can afford to.
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Why is King Abdullah willing to let Saudi women vote but not drive cars?

Why is King Abdullah willing to let Saudi women vote but not drive cars? | Education in the world | Scoop.it
King Abdullah announced on Sunday that  Saudi women will be allowed to vote and run for office in municipal elections beginning in 2015.

 

Driving a car as simple as it may sound, is a method of enhancing mobility and that means freedom of spatial expression.  This decision to allow women to vote has only demonstrated the cultural constraints of gender roles and how much more progress is needed.  


Via Seth Dixon
Crissy Borton's insight:

Letting women vote makes the Saudi government look as though they are giving equal rights to women, however we do not know if they are being pressured to vote a certain way or even if their votes count. Women drivers would mean the women have more freedom and can go anyplace they want. The government does not want them to have real freedom.

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Al Picozzi's curator insight, October 20, 2013 12:54 PM

This amazing to see that women still have very little rights in this kingdom.  Again like the article state the right to vote in Saudia Arabia is noting, especially when compared to the right to vote in the US.  This is still a monarchy, ruled by a family from above, not a constitiutional monarchy like the UK, there is no parliament and  the elections can be canceleld at any time.  To the Saudi's giving the women the right to drive goes against their very culture, their belief that women need to be subserviate to men.  The right to vote, since it is meaningless, means nothing to advacne women's rights in Saudia Arabia.  The king really is not giving anything at all, he is just making it look like he is...interesting.

Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, October 21, 2013 1:15 PM

I find this article to be interesting because while granting women the right to vote and run for office seems like it would be a bigger deal than granting women the right to drive a car, it is the exact opposite.  Women now have the right to vote and to run for political office in Saudi Arabia, but this essentially means nothing because Saudi leaders can indirectly block women from this said right by postponing elections or altering votes, and so forth.  Elections are purely symbolic in Saudi Arabia, so this new right for women that will begin in 2015 really does not mean much.  However, the right for a woman to drive a car, is so dangerous to Saudi leaders because this would give women so much power.  They could freely transport themselves anywhere, and look for a job.  This article shows the impact of particular political decisions on particular groups of people.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 4, 7:54 PM

It seems odd that women can vote but not drive an automobile. It appears the King does not want women to explore the country freely. He may not want to give women all that freedom at one time… Also, he must not want women traveling and exploring areas alone in a car. Although the entire situation in Saudi Arabia is sad, this appears to be a small step forward for women. 

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Studying "Green"

Studying "Green" | Education in the world | Scoop.it

"Green is an unusual film. It is both a hard hitting portrayal of the causes and consequences of deforestation in Indonesia, and a film which captures the tranquillity and calm of wild nature. It contains no narrative or dialogue and yet helps us understand complex commodity chains. Green needs to be taken seriously.  In these pages we present a series of short essays in response to the film." 


'Green' is a female orangutan in Indonesia, beset with deforestation and resource exploitation of her habitat.  This is a non-profit film follows her; watch at the film’s website or view the trailer: http://www.greenthefilm.com/


Via Seth Dixon
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Planting Rice

Thailand...

Feel free to mute the commentary...this video demonstrates the truly 'back-breaking' work that is a part of paddy rice farming. 


Via Seth Dixon
Crissy Borton's insight:

From now on anytime I eat rice I will think of these people. I had no idea how hard a job it was. I don’t think I would last an hour bending over like that.

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Donald Dane's comment, December 10, 2013 10:20 AM
this video of Thailand shows just how different life styles are throughout the world. Americans for instance wouldn't be found dead doing this type of labor work. that goes to show just how shallow americans are and how incredible these people are for doing labor of this nature. planting rice is not only a life style they pick to do it is a life style they must do. with rice being Thailand's prime export and an ideal location for rice paddys this "job" isn't actually a job its a must do. these women spend hundreds of hours a week doing this.
Brett Sinica's curator insight, December 10, 2013 4:11 PM

When you look at Thailand from satellite imagery, it looks as though much of the country has a tannish color which you would think is dry and has less vegetation compared to neighboring countries.  The country actual has quite a bit of rainfall, and the suspect for all the dry-looking areas is farming fields for things such as rice.  This is serious manual labor with constant bending and speedy methods.  Though in a culture, and broader surrounding region that uses rice so frequently in their meals, having these type of farms is necessary to everyday life.

Denise Pacheco's curator insight, December 17, 2013 12:03 PM

Just watching them work makes my back hurt. I feel terribel for them, but it is their job. I wonder if there are any machines or tools that they can use to get their job done more uickly and easier. Agriculture started off just like this. It was only people planting and doing all the work, but now in there are machines used for this new generation of agriculture. It's just sad that many countries still can't afford all these tools or machines. So unfortunately, people do have to physically hurt themselves or go through some sort of pain just to get things done. But this video makes me appreicate more where my food is coming from, because the foods that I buy does come from all over the world.

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Finding the flotsam: where is Japan's floating tsunami wreckage headed?

Finding the flotsam: where is Japan's floating tsunami wreckage headed? | Education in the world | Scoop.it

Scientists model where and when the debris from the March 2011 Japanese tsunami will be.  The likelihood that the debris (not radioactive) will reach the U.S. west coast is increasingly likely.  Look at the great video attached to the article.   


Via Seth Dixon
Crissy Borton's insight:

Interesting to see were all the “junk” is going. I wonder how it effects the water and the ecosystem as it moves.

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Brett Sinica's curator insight, December 10, 2013 5:02 PM

This video showed time elasped which stopped in the summer of 2013, it is now December.  At the time of the video the mass was entering the eastern part of the Pacific Ocean so I'm curious to where it is now.  I can't find any current imagery of the vast ocean but it would be a neat, yet dangerous spectacle.  I could only imagine any of the harm it's causing on the sealife on its way across the pacific.  We can only hope that doesn't bring too many issues once it washes up on the west coast, if at all.

Paige McClatchy's curator insight, December 14, 2013 6:09 PM

Hopefully none of the wreckage that reaches the US is radioactive.... But the projected travel of the debris shows how ocean currents create, almost, a "natural" globalization of natural disasters. 

Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, September 1, 10:43 AM

Although it's important to know where all of this trash is headed, this just makes me think of how we might prevent this. We can't prevent these catastrophic natural disasters, but how might we lessen it's effects on our cities and settlements? Furthermore, how might we lessen our impact on ecosystems during these times of catastrophe? 

It's only called a catastrophe when it hits human populations for a reason, it's not just devastating to us. Remnants of our lifestyle are carried far and wide, able to cause harm on many other species. 

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Hiroshima after the Atomic Bomb

Hiroshima after the Atomic Bomb | Education in the world | Scoop.it
360° panoramic photography by Harbert F. Austin Jr.. Visit us to see more amazing panoramas from Japan and thousands of other places in the world.

 

The interactive panorama is eerily compelling...this is a haunting image. 


Via Seth Dixon
Crissy Borton's insight:

It looks like the world has ended. There is almost nothing left,

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Brett Sinica's curator insight, November 29, 2013 2:15 PM

The panorama is eery.  The trees are dead, there is rubble, it is literally a deadzone.  No scary movie or horror story can compare to this type of devastation.  The black and white contrast seems to add even more depth to the pictures because of the consistent trend of nothingness.  It shows how massive the damage actually was.  What I found interesting is the trolley line with people riding bikes or walking on the same road.  Thinking of how they walked around after the bombs had dropped must be the strangest feeling because everything around them was simply gone.

Cam E's curator insight, April 8, 11:26 AM

The thing that always stumps me about pictures after bombings and other disasters is the reason why some things are left standing. Here we see buildings destroyed and utterly annihilated as far as the eye can see, yet the telephone poles are still standing in some areas. The picture can't capture the true scope of the destruction, but it also shows how destruction is a bit random in its own way.

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 14, 6:32 PM

This panoramic photograph shows the devastation of Hiroshima after the Atomic Bomb. Everything in sight is destroyed. Houses and poles that were lucky enough to still be standing are even lost causes. 

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Worker safety in China

This is an incredible video because of the shocking footage of blatant disregard for worker safety.  This can lead to an interesting discussion concerning how China has been able to have its economy grow.  What other ways has China (or Chinese companies) been "cutting corners?"  How does that give them a competitive edge on the global industrial market?     


Via Seth Dixon
Crissy Borton's insight:

How long will the government allow and incourage lake of worker safty before they no longer have workers or the people stand up and say enough!

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Paige McClatchy's curator insight, December 14, 2013 5:13 PM

This video is jaw-dropping proof of how China cuts corners in their quest for growing their economy. With such a large population looking for work China does not really need to protect their workers. I wonder if China will experience a labor movement similar to the one in the US that introduced protective legislation.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 12, 9:19 AM

This video shows a complete lack of concern for worker safety in China. The workers use the backhoe as a makeshift platform so one of them can cut the rebar suspending a massive piece of concrete from the side of the building. These kinds of shortcuts are the ways which China is able to keep a competitive edge in the world market. With hardly any regard for fair wages, worker safety, or worker rights, China is able to manufacture goods for prices no one else can compete with. Eventually, China will face opposition from its workforce as its industry matures and the government can either appease them or face revolution.

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 14, 6:47 PM

In Beijing, workers safety is not a top priority. This video may shock viewers to the extreme levels workers will go to for such a small paycheck. This worker, many stories up climbs onto an excavator to be lowered down to a area that could not be reached. It is insane how these unsafe conditions compare to Americas. It makes you wonder how China has such a growing economy and a global leader when when things like this are happening on a day to day basis.

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Shanghai: 1990 vs. 2010

Shanghai: 1990 vs. 2010 | Education in the world | Scoop.it

Globalization has hit...hard and fast. 


Via Seth Dixon
Crissy Borton's insight:

It looks like a completely different city. Sadly you can no longer see any green.

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Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 11:02 PM

Shanghai could arguably be the best example of globalization in the world today. In the span of 20 years, it has gone from a sparse city with some commerce on the river to a major urban center with the skyscrapers and neon lights. The transformation between the two images is staggering and it's easy to see the resemblance between current day Shanghai and it's partner globalized cities like New York and Seoul.

Cam E's curator insight, April 8, 11:23 AM

Apart from what can be said about the process of Globalization, this is just impressive under the lens of what can be done in 20 years to change the skylines and landscapes of an area. Notice the lack of vegetation in the second picture, and while it may just be an effect of the different time of day or season, they sky seems a lot more fogged in the second picture, possibly due to pollution.

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 14, 6:35 PM

Shanghai has transformed and globalized so quickly in the last twenty years that it doesn't even look like that same place. Skies that were once seen are now blocked by skyscrapers. Buildings that still remain are overpowered and do not stand out like they once did.

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Dhaka: fastest growing megacity in the world

A five-part, multimedia series on the coming dystopia that is urbanization.

 

This is a great introduction to the explosion of the slums within megacities.  This video as a part of the article is especially useful.   Click on the title to read the accompanying article.


Via Seth Dixon
Crissy Borton's insight:

People are leaving the rural areas to move to Dhaka in hopes of a better life. However the slums they move to do not have running water or electricity. It looks as though they are living in garbage dumb. It is sad that this is better for them. It is also surprising that the mayor has no control over the city that the national government is in charge.  

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Brett Sinica's curator insight, November 19, 2013 2:21 PM

I recently did a project on the topic of megacities in the past, present, and future and how the natural risks they posed.  In past decades there was Tokyo, New York City, or even Mexico City.  I also covered present cities such as Shangai and Los Angeles to name a few.  The city that basically topped the growth charts in my statistics was Dhaka.  The city literally is growing like a chia pet, but with no direct plan or proper use of land.  According to future calculations, the city of Dhaka can reach roughly 23 million by 2025, that's about 600,000 new people coming in every year up until that point.  This video is just an example of how poorly planned this megacity is, and what the future holds for all of the people living there.  It's simply chaos.  There are already squatter settlements and unorganized living conditions for the current residents, picturing the population to grow even more is outrageous!

Meagan Harpin's curator insight, November 20, 2013 11:43 AM

The city of Dhaka has experienced a massivie boom in population. Both the rich and the poor are flowing into this city causing many problems that all complain the government is ignoring instead of fixing. The city is very inefficient, with traffic so bad that it is costing the city millions of dollars. There are frequent water shortages resulting in protests in the streets. There is much infrastructure throughout the city as well. But it is also represents a sense of hope to the people that are coming in and moving into the slums, that with the better jobs and money they will be able to get they can better provide for themselves or their family.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 6, 11:23 PM

Dhaka is the fastest growing city in the world, as rich and poor people move to the city everyday. So many poor people are moving here due to the fact there is no other place worth living in Bangladesh. The city is facing many problems, such as lack of traffic signals, minimal clean drinking water for residents and horrible housing for many people. However, some feel the city’s slums offer the best chance for an improved life.   

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How did Pakistan get it's name?

How did Pakistan get it's name? | Education in the world | Scoop.it

"The name of the country Pakistan has a fascinating history - it is essentially an acronym!  Prior to 1947, the country now known as Pakistan was a British colony. In 1947 the United Kingdom granted independence to the region under a new name, Pakistan. The name had been developed by a group of students at Cambridge University who issued a pamphlet in 1933 called Now or Never."


In a country with such great ethnic divisions, a common religion is a powerful nationalizing force.  As the capital city of Islamabad's toponym powerfully states (the house or abode of Islam), religion remains an important element of national identity for Pakistanis.   


Via Seth Dixon
Crissy Borton's insight:

I have huge doubts about if this is how Pakistan got it’s name. About.com is just that a .com anyone can own one and say what they wish. I am not sure how legitimate the site is. If is true that it crazy 

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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 15, 2013 9:13 PM

In 1947 the United Kingdom granted independence to this region and named it Pakistan. The name was created by a group of students at Cambrige University and used the names of their homelands. Punjab, Afghania  Kashmir, Iran ,Sindh, Tukharistan, Afghanistan, Pakistan is an acronym! 

Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, November 14, 2013 9:06 AM

It is interesting to learn how particular countries got their names.  Pakistan was a British colony until 1947 and it was given the name Pakistan as an acronym for the 8 homelands in the country.  Pakistan is so ethnically divided that religion is really important for the country to stay together.

Brett Sinica's curator insight, November 19, 2013 2:27 PM

When you take in the way that the British Empire controlled many colonies and tried to spread their culture to such diverse regions, it is no suprise that Pakistan was named essentially by a game of Scrabble.  I suppose the naming is somewhat creative and certainly unique compared to how other countries get their names, yet just picturing a group of colleagues naming a country is strange.  Though the U.K. did grant them independance, how independant were they really if they weren't even given the right to name their own land.

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Bangladesh: Facing the Challenge

Global warming does not impact all areas equally, and in the future the less environmentally resilient countries will be at increasingly at risk.  Bangladesh, as a flat area prone to flooding, is especially vulnerable to anthropogenic climate change.  However, Bangladesh has implemented many changes in the cultural ecology to make sure that they are using the land differently to strengthen their environmental resilience.     


Via Seth Dixon
Crissy Borton's insight:

When I think of innovation Bangladesh is not a place I think of. Yet they are coming up with innovative ways to deal with the global climate change. It is sad they are so effected by something they did not cause. 

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Stacey Jackson's curator insight, May 8, 2013 8:29 PM

It was inspiring to see people in Bangladesh use ingenuity to adapt to climate change. Considering the nation's vulnerability to the effect of climate change, the introduction of solar panels, rain water harvesting and other techniques is essential. Maybe if other countries had the same sense of urgency, we would be making greater progress in terms of reversing climate change.

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Selling condoms in the Congo

TED Talks HIV is a serious problem in the DR Congo, and aid agencies have flooded the country with free and cheap condoms. But few people are using them. Why?

 

This video highlights why some well-intending NGOs with excellent plans for the developing world don't have the impact they are hoping for. Cultural barriers to diffusion abound and finding a way to make your idea resonate with your target audience takes some preparation. This also addresses some important demographic and health-related issues, so the clip could be used in a variety of places within the curriculum. FYI: this clip briefly shows some steamy condom ads.


Via Seth Dixon
Crissy Borton's insight:

Marketing is not something I would have thought about when trying to get people in the Kongo to use condoms. Her research into the brands they use and why may save many lives.

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Matt Mallinson's comment, October 31, 2012 12:33 PM
STD's and many other diseases are more common and dangerous to be found in Africa. I think it's a great idea giving the people of Congo cheap condoms to be safer, it all depends on if they actually use them.
Derek Ethier's comment, November 5, 2012 2:26 PM
AIDs is an epidemic in Africa, so selling condoms in the Congo is a groundbreaking idea. In fact, I am surprised that no one had thought of this earlier. In a continent where millions are affected by AIDs, it is essential that measures be taken to prevent the spread of the deadly virus.
Nick Flanagan's curator insight, December 12, 2012 8:27 PM

I was surprised actually that it took this long for someone to think of this, given the fact that the AIDS crisis in Africa is practically a pandemic.However it is a good idea that someone had finally started to do something about it.  

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Taking Root: The Vision of Wangari Maathai

Taking Root tells the dramatic story of Kenyan Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Wangari Maathai whose simple act of planting trees grew into a nationwide movement ...

 

Community, agriculture, gender, politics and the environment... it's all here in this inspiring clip.  


Via Seth Dixon
Crissy Borton's insight:

This is such an inspiring video. All it took was for one women, Wangari Maathai, to have an idea and to stand up for that idea for change to take place. How cool that from that one women a government was changed at 35 million trees planted!

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Sean Rooney's comment, November 5, 2012 2:52 PM
S.R. This video clip covers a wide range of the different aspects in geography. We talked about the significant impact of natural resources in countries that rely on natural resources to stimulate the economy. For example, planting trees will stimulate the economy and create jobs in Africa. This is the first step towards industrialization in Africa. The community, agriculture, gender, politics, and the environment are all interconnected.
Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, December 10, 2013 7:02 PM

To me seem that it was more than just planting trees. Is was a way for this woman to have some type of control. Their story show how nothing is impossible, that sometimes we think that whatever little thing we do, it would not make a different. Those woman illustrate that no matter how powerless you feel. If you believe in something no stop until you get it accomplished.

Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, December 12, 2013 1:20 AM

It seems that the people depend on planting. it also hurts that these people have little access to water. Where other parts in this world there is too much water and it is hurting the people. It is devastating what is happening to them. The trees that are planted could help them get water in some kind of way. But it might take them a while because to grow a tree it takes years to grow.

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Fighting for Iraq: A regional powerplay

Fighting for Iraq: A regional powerplay | Education in the world | Scoop.it
Learn more about the ethnic, religious and political powerplays in and around Iraq during a virtual tour of the region led by NBC’s Richard Engel.

 

This is an incredibly well-put together, video/slideshow about the complex geography of within Iraq that has lead to so many difficulties in the post-Saddam Hussein era.   The ethnic patterns, religious divisions, spatial arrangements of resources as well as the larger regional context all play roles in creating the a contentious political environment. 


Via Seth Dixon
Crissy Borton's insight:

I enjoyed this video. I never really understood why these groups were fighting. It was an easy video to understand and I learned that the fighting is not just about religious but cultural differences as well. 

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Elizabeth Allen's comment, December 6, 2012 11:35 PM
I have always felt that Iraq is very complex. And it is. However the videos shed some light on clarifying what most of the turmoil is about.
Stacey Jackson's curator insight, March 22, 2013 11:03 PM

Although I try to keep up with world events, Iraq has puzzled me. This was spectacularly helpful, although I still don't feel like I have the full picture. For instance, I understand that three ethnic groups were forced in to a new country, Iraq, after World War I and that the country has been in turmoil ever since. However, these ethnic groups were all a part of the Ottoman Empire before there was an Iraq, so why did the trouble start after the formation of Iraq?

 

These ethnic groups had their own provinces within the Ottoman Empire. I'm assuming these groups thought they'd establish their own separate nations after the fall of the Ottoman Empire, but were not given the chance to decide for themselves since Iraq was a product of "European powers." If this is accurate, then European nations have a horrible track record when it comes to dictating foreign boundaries that lead to unrest abroad.