Education in the world
306 views | +0 today
Follow
Education in the world
Education in different places of the world
Curated by Crissy Borton
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Crissy Borton from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Venice sinking five times faster than thought?

Venice sinking five times faster than thought? | Education in the world | Scoop.it

I never though about Venice sinking until I read this article although I have wondered of buildings to not corrode in the water. I also never thought about possible flooding issues in the city although it makes sense that it could be an issue. It is weird to think about such a beautiful city one day being sunk


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Brett Sinica's curator insight, October 8, 2013 3:36 PM

Day to day, even looking into next year the rate of 2 millimeters per year may not seem drastic.  To a city that has been around for hundreds of years, it's assumed the city plans to stay standing for hundreds more.  Considering the age of the city, say in a couple hundred more years, some buildings could begin to take in water.  It is also possible that certain parts of the city could be sinking faster than others.  There is a similar situation in Mexico City where it was built on a lake and each year that source diminishes due to the demand of water by its residents.  Certain parts of the city are sinking and some buildings are slanted due to the results.  These cities are beautiful  but reality shows that as time passes, it will probably only get worse.  Hopefully preventions can be taken to at least reduce the speed of sinking so that people after us can appreciate the architecture and atmosphere the city has provided all these years.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 8, 2014 12:11 PM

Venice is a city that capitalized on its geography and developed canals so the city could grow despite being so close to sea level. Now that sea levels are rising, Venice is in trouble because its survival is dependent on the water levels, as they become out of control Venice will not be able to withstand the change. There are similar circumstances like in the Maldives where global warming and rising sea levels will put entire countries under water.

Kendra King's curator insight, February 15, 2015 6:58 PM

As you mentioned in class, we are living on constantly moving land features. In the case of Venice, the water is moving in on the city so it is actually sinking and has been for quite some time. What is new to the equation is that it might be sinking “five times more than” originally “calculated or “7.8 inches every hundred years.” I say might be because there are others who quibble about this new find, saying it is inaccurate. Also, there is a damn project in the works to try and combat the sinking. While I am happy that the city is working on slowing the process, I am curious to know what their solution is going to be when the city finally does go under. As I was reading this all I could think of was saving all the rich art and history that this Italian city is famous for. In some ways it is great that the city knows ahead of time that it is sinking because they have time to plan a way to save the important aspects of the city. On another hand though, the city is so below sea level that a natural disaster could cause far more damage than anyone could have foreseen. I just hope that doesn’t happen anytime soon because Venice is definitely on my bucket list.  

 

Rescooped by Crissy Borton from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Giant outdoor escalator built in Colombian shantytown

Not everyday you see an escalator outside in a poor community. I wish the video would have talked more about why and what they hope it helps the city with. I am sure the people are glad not to have to walk up and down the steep hill but I have to wonder who is going to maintain it and where will the money come from?


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 20, 2014 11:20 AM

This escalator seems like a waste of money. I understand that it will make life easier for the locals and possible cut down crime. But I feel with $7 million the government is choosing to attack the symptoms of living in the shantytown rather than treating the cause of inequalities. Perhaps they could have opened up local markets, started some sort of commercially viable industry, or help educate citizens that could provide the community members with a way to get out of poverty rather than.just making it easier to live in these shantytowns.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 2014 7:09 PM

This is an interesting idea simply because of the discussion that can arise from it. Would the construction of this escalator actually benefit the people living within the slum to any foreseeable degree? On one hand some claim that yes it will have a positive impact as it could cut back on the number at attacks and muggings of those stopping to catch their breath as well as simply allowing them to conserve energy. While those on the other side of the issue say that the benefit the escalator my bring doesn't out weigh the cost of building it. Simply throwing money at a situation like this wont actually bring any relief. 

Kendra King's curator insight, February 8, 2015 4:40 PM

I sincerely believe that was a waste of money. Sure people can now get out of the area in “6 minutes” instead of “30 minutes” which, as was mentioned in class, can get people out of the area so as to get to jobs quicker. However what good does that really do in the grand scheme of things? Do the citizens still have poor jobs? Are their homes unsafe? Are there still sanitation issues? I am pretty sure the answer is yes, to all of the above. Clearly, these issues are more pressing than an escalator. So even if investing in an area can benefit a population, I think the improvement could have been greater because there are other more pressing needs of the area where the money could have been invested. 

 

I am actually surprised people were happy with the new addition. Given that it was a short clip, not all sides were seen. However, I feel that once people get over the novelty of the new toy and back to the reality of their everyday situation tensions could raise. Especially if the outdoor elevator breaks down, which is bound to happen given its exposure to mother nature, as the escalator just adds more of  a maintenance cost in a place that doesn't seem to have money. It wouldn't surprise me if people were later angered by the addition. In fact, I am actually surprised their wasn't protests that stopped the escalator from being built in the first place.  

Rescooped by Crissy Borton from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

For Mexico City, a Repurposed Landfill

For Mexico City, a Repurposed Landfill | Education in the world | Scoop.it

Wow! What a great idea to use the gas from the landfill to power homes. Although it may only work for a few years it would still be doing something useful with the gas from the landfill. I wonder if they will design their next landfill to be use more energy.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 14, 2014 4:20 PM

Usually when a landfill becomes overloaded, it just gets shut down and left to rot. Mexico City is trying to do something new and ingenious with its massive landfill. Instead of closing off the land and letting it stay as reusable space, Mexico is hoping to develop a way to harness landfill gases in order to make electricity. If it is successful, it could prove to be a world-changing solution for other large, developing cities. It has the potential of lowering energy costs, creating jobs, and finding a purpose for land that would otherwise remain unusable for probably centuries. 

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 16, 2014 7:58 AM

In class we discussed the numerous environmental issues that exist in Mexico City. This is a great way of turning a negative into a positive. On a larger scale, I think this is going to be the kind of solutions that every country will have to eventually find. Creative ways of using technology to turn harmful waste into energy is a great idea. Methane is a cleaner than coal and recycling lessens the burden on natural resources.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 11:31 AM

this is a genius use of a necessary evil [landfills]. in the modern world energy is necessary, and the use of methane from a landfill means that the fuel is cheap, and that cost will transfer to the cost of power for the people buying it.

Rescooped by Crissy Borton from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Dhaka: fastest growing megacity in the world

A five-part, multimedia series on the coming dystopia that is urbanization.

 

This is a great introduction to the explosion of the slums within megacities.  This video as a part of the article is especially useful.   Click on the title to read the accompanying article.


Via Seth Dixon
Crissy Borton's insight:

People are leaving the rural areas to move to Dhaka in hopes of a better life. However the slums they move to do not have running water or electricity. It looks as though they are living in garbage dumb. It is sad that this is better for them. It is also surprising that the mayor has no control over the city that the national government is in charge.  

more...
Meagan Harpin's curator insight, November 20, 2013 11:43 AM

The city of Dhaka has experienced a massivie boom in population. Both the rich and the poor are flowing into this city causing many problems that all complain the government is ignoring instead of fixing. The city is very inefficient, with traffic so bad that it is costing the city millions of dollars. There are frequent water shortages resulting in protests in the streets. There is much infrastructure throughout the city as well. But it is also represents a sense of hope to the people that are coming in and moving into the slums, that with the better jobs and money they will be able to get they can better provide for themselves or their family.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 6, 2014 11:23 PM

Dhaka is the fastest growing city in the world, as rich and poor people move to the city everyday. So many poor people are moving here due to the fact there is no other place worth living in Bangladesh. The city is facing many problems, such as lack of traffic signals, minimal clean drinking water for residents and horrible housing for many people. However, some feel the city’s slums offer the best chance for an improved life.   

Sarah Cannon's curator insight, December 14, 2015 10:48 AM

There is a lot of poverty and pollution in Dhaka. The demands for energy and water are high in Dhaka as well. I personally don't see how these people and migrants can live in such a polluted and dirty place and the reason why I can't imagine living in such a place is because I never have. I'm lucky enough to not experience poverty and I greatly appreciate  my life and home. Hopefully things improve in Dhaka and places like Dhaka. Hopefully there will be less pollution and poverty in the future any where in the world.

Rescooped by Crissy Borton from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Taming the City of God

Taming the City of God | Education in the world | Scoop.it

It was great to see that the police force and is reaching out to the community and changing the people’s prospective of them. It was heartwarming to see the young man who was so angry about his brothers death learn that all the officers are not the same. I hope the efforts by the police will continue after the Olympics


Via Seth Dixon
more...
James Hobson's curator insight, September 30, 2014 9:08 AM

(South America topic 7)

The details pertaining to how Rio's police force has been regaining control in favelas surprised me, but in a positive way. For example, having officers work and volunteer with children is a great idea to stop the generation chain of fearing the police as the enemy. I believe the message that this communicates is that the police are human too, sharing many of the same aspirations as those who they serve. It's unfortunate that this ramping-up in force comes mainly because of the approaching Olympics, but at least it is still a step in the right direction.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 20, 2014 12:42 PM

This video shows the tense relationship between the favales and the government of Brazil. I can't help but notice how people in the favales are being treated as lesser citizens that are not part of the collective identity of Brazil. As these big sporting events draw near, the government is more concerned with hiding or eliminating the systemic inequalities that are occurring in the favales. If I lived in these areas I would find it hard not to see the government as an enemy.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 7, 2015 12:10 PM
I think that it is very good that tensions between the police and the citizens of the city are cooling down. Yes, there were many problems in the past, but that is the past, now there is just the present and future. With police being more active in the community responding to calls more frequently, or attending schools to show that not all of them are bad people. It is also good to know that an officer holds a martial arts program for the kids, something like that really gets people, especially the young to feel safe around them. Also, with schooling and environmental projects becoming much better, it seems as if the City of God is going in the correct path that it should.
Rescooped by Crissy Borton from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

In Venezuela Housing Crisis, Squatters Find 45-Story Walkup

In Venezuela Housing Crisis, Squatters Find 45-Story Walkup | Education in the world | Scoop.it

It is amazing that these people all came together to build their own community in the unfinished building. I commend them for helping each other out and trying to make the best of the situation and to use the resources like this building to be able to live and care for their families. It is sad though that the government does not work with these people to maybe finish the building


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 5:34 PM

The video we watched of the squatters living in an unfinished skyscraper was unlike anything I've ever seen before. In a country with such high population rates and a housing shortage, people have gotten creative and made homes in this 45 story building where they share what would have been office spaces and bathrooms.  Over 2,500 people have moved into the dilapidated skyscraper and made a home out of it for their families. They have rigged electricity that the government does not provide for them and built small stores on almost every floor.  The people have not been evicted because the government of Venezuela knows of the housing shortages, yet does not fix it.  

I feel ashamed that a country with so many oil resources has such high rates of poverty and no one is fixing it.  It shows the corruption in the government through an extreme although innovative example.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, February 17, 2014 10:46 AM

The problems in Venezuela with housing and the lack of response to the problem by the government has led people to become squatters.  The using of the abandoned buildings was a good idea by the original squatters.  The vacant buildings can house many of the countries it is a shame that the government did not think of this solution to the housing problem and vacant building first, if they had, they could have made sure they were safer for the residence.  The idea of a vertical city springing up in this building is also an interesting one.  Not only are squatters living in these buildings but creating businesses and other services for the residence.

Jess Deady's curator insight, February 18, 2014 1:02 PM

In life, I constantly find myself comparing situations with what I read and what I know. Imagine this skyscraper is the Prudential in Boston. How could something meant to be so great fall to its death (and to peoples literal deaths)? One day there is a massive financial building occupied with bankers and lavishness. The next day there is a skyscraper in the form of a house. Housing shortages are happening everywhere and Venezuela is being hit hard in this situation. Imagine visiting this country and asking where someone lives? "Oh, I live in the Tower of David, which used to mean a whole lot more."

Rescooped by Crissy Borton from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Gentrification spelled out

Gentrification spelled out | Education in the world | Scoop.it

I find it a little sad that they renamed the restaurant. I wonder if they were pressured to do it. I do not think the name matters as long as the food is good ☺ I wonder if the people purchasing the more expensive condos where not patronizing it do to the name. I wonder if the name change will help bring in business.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Jacob Crowell's curator insight, September 25, 2014 5:35 PM

Gentrification deals with the forcing out of lower income residents and making space available for the more affluent. The re-naming of Fish in the 'Hood shows how gentrification forces the culture  of entire communities to change. Although this restaurant was popular before, they were forced to re-brand so they can stay in business. Gentrification exiles the poor, with that their culture. This restaurant shows that, as more upscale business open up to service the needs of more affluent citizens, any business that has the perception of being the contrary will soon be out of business. This matters because it shows how gentrification destroys communities image, and culture for the sake of increasing revenue and real estate value. What is exhibit here is not only a socio-economic shift but also a racial shift as well. This neighborhood was predominately African American before it began to gentrify, "The 'Hood" is a saying that correlates with African American culture. This restaurant's re-branding shows that they no longer can continue to bring in customers with a name that is part of the African American vernacular. Furthermore, it shows the racial trends that go with gentrification where minority culture is pushed out as more money flows in.

Emerald Pina's curator insight, May 25, 2015 11:15 AM

The article talks about a restaurant called Fish In The NeighborHood, with emphasis on Hood, that has not been affected by the gentrification that has happened in the area. He still refers to the area as "Hood" even with all the newly built building. The article also describes the process of the gentrification, and people's opinions on the name of the restaurant compared to the area.

 

This article relates to Unit 7: Cities and Urban Land Use because it explains the idea and process of gentrification. It gives an example of how some buildings are unaffected by the gentrified area. 

Savannah Rains's curator insight, May 27, 2015 2:50 AM

this article is taking the time to plainly spell out what gentrification is and where it is happening. Gentrification means the taking of lowe class land and making it more valuable to try and boost the overall way of life in that area. Most people are blind to this system and should take the time to learn about it. 

Rescooped by Crissy Borton from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Shanghai: 1990 vs. 2010

Shanghai: 1990 vs. 2010 | Education in the world | Scoop.it

Globalization has hit...hard and fast. 


Via Seth Dixon
Crissy Borton's insight:

It looks like a completely different city. Sadly you can no longer see any green.

more...
Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 4:19 PM

Shanghai China, a global transportatio hub has grown tremendously into a megaity within 20 years. This is due to the high imports and the location on the river. This created a high import rate and a low wage rate. Because of this they were able to build this city into a megacity.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 8:22 PM
Wow! All I can say is Wow! Shanghai overall in every way is highly indistinguishable from what it was in 1990. On the far side it is minimally developed and on the close side it has what looks to be a fairly modern city for the 90s. Take a jump twenty years and it is as if it was built the way it looks currently Even the side closest that was developed in the 90s, looks like it was scrapped and rebuilt to be even more modern, a mega city. Because of its strategic location and has a river for transportation, it is a transportation hub, which is why it has the money to do what it does.
Alex Vielman's curator insight, December 15, 2015 12:46 AM

These two images are perhaps a goo example of how globalization has developed over Shanghai in just 20 years. The images show how once greener and more spacious the region looked before in 1990, and the other image shows how technology has developed and become an important priority to the people. There are huge tall buildings located in the area and the other natural source seen is the body of water surrounding some of the tallest buildings in the area. There is no longer any trees which is also a sign of how un-important or how simple to was for the Shanghai to knock them down to simply make more buildings. The concept shows how business has developed in the region but also shows the potentially jobs located here as well. Overall, this part of Shanghai is very economically stable but it is also important to see outside of the heart of the buildings.