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Europe's failure to integrate Muslims

Europe's failure to integrate Muslims | Education in the world | Scoop.it

Although I feel people should be respectul of other cultures, religions and differenaces I also think that no one group should be given special treatment. Are other religious groups given prayer time at public schools? Are other people restriced from wearing religious articals if they have a public job? If countries are singling out Muslims thenI think the proublem is the countries however if Muslims are demanding special treatment then they are at fault.


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Elizabeth Allen's comment, October 3, 2012 5:49 PM
As we leearned in class, Europe has a declining population. If Europe continues to ban certain religions and culture, then obviously its population will continue to decline. It seems as though religion and poitics clash, just as they do elsewhere around the world. If women want to wear headscarves, let them. They are proud of their religion just as many of us are. Seems to me that the world is becoming more secular, restricitve and intrusive than religious.
Shayna and Kayla's curator insight, February 6, 9:29 AM

This represents the religion section because Europe is restricting islamic symbols causing controversy .

Geography Jordan & Danielle's curator insight, February 7, 10:18 AM

Religion: freedom of religion is not a law is some parts of Europe 

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Religious architecture of Islam

Religious architecture of Islam | Education in the world | Scoop.it

It is interesting that some of these building were used as both masques and cathedrals. I was surprised to read that those working on the Mezquita in Cordoba Spain were free to worship their own religion in it.


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Cam E's curator insight, March 4, 8:14 AM

I particularly like this article as it demonstrates something which is lost among talk of Islam. I once was speaking to an Imam about how different sects of Islam could spring up when they only had one holy text which was unchanging. The Imam described to me that each culture attached their own ideas to Islam far in the past, to the point where the two become intertwined and indistinguishable from each other. This can account for the differences we see in architecture, but also the differences we can see in belief and practice of Islam.

Quran Coaching's curator insight, July 18, 9:32 AM
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Quran Coaching's curator insight, July 19, 7:00 AM

Help us spread the message of Quran/Hadith around the world.
Online Quran,online Tajweed.In Shaa Allah
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Religious Pilgrimage: the Hajj

Religious Pilgrimage: the Hajj | Education in the world | Scoop.it

This is a beautiful photoessay of the Hajj, with excellent captions that shows many of the cultural customs that are associated with the massive pilgrimage.  The tremendous influx of tourists/pilgrims into the Mecca area, there is a huge economic industry that supports and depends on the tourists.  For a BBC article about the market impacts of the Hajj, see: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-11777483


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These photo’s are amazing! Number 12 with the crowd of people and the ambulance in the middle shows the massive amount of people. Their heads look like dots in a sea of white. These pictures show what words just cannot describe. 

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Elizabeth Allen's comment, December 6, 2012 8:21 PM
The photos show what an immense congregation this event really is. If a picture is worth a thoudsand words, than this collection is a jackpot. The colors are captivating, green costumes of participants in the military parade, the hands holding the beads for sale. In the article from bbc.co.uk it is interesting to learn that such a religious event is an opportunity for economic gains. From merchants selling beads and rugs to visitors all the way to hotels capitalizing on the religious pilgrimage. It is amazing to know that every Muslim should make this trip as long as he/she is healthy and can afford to.
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TED Talk: Readings of the Qu'ran

I enjoyed this video very much. It was not long and did not throw too much information at me but was very informative. It was interesting to hear what was in the Koran and what has been misquoted such as the 72 virgins.


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Fighting for Iraq: A regional powerplay

Fighting for Iraq: A regional powerplay | Education in the world | Scoop.it
Learn more about the ethnic, religious and political powerplays in and around Iraq during a virtual tour of the region led by NBC’s Richard Engel.

 

This is an incredibly well-put together, video/slideshow about the complex geography of within Iraq that has lead to so many difficulties in the post-Saddam Hussein era.   The ethnic patterns, religious divisions, spatial arrangements of resources as well as the larger regional context all play roles in creating the a contentious political environment. 


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I enjoyed this video. I never really understood why these groups were fighting. It was an easy video to understand and I learned that the fighting is not just about religious but cultural differences as well. 

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Elizabeth Allen's comment, December 6, 2012 8:35 PM
I have always felt that Iraq is very complex. And it is. However the videos shed some light on clarifying what most of the turmoil is about.
Stacey Jackson's curator insight, March 22, 2013 8:03 PM

Although I try to keep up with world events, Iraq has puzzled me. This was spectacularly helpful, although I still don't feel like I have the full picture. For instance, I understand that three ethnic groups were forced in to a new country, Iraq, after World War I and that the country has been in turmoil ever since. However, these ethnic groups were all a part of the Ottoman Empire before there was an Iraq, so why did the trouble start after the formation of Iraq?

 

These ethnic groups had their own provinces within the Ottoman Empire. I'm assuming these groups thought they'd establish their own separate nations after the fall of the Ottoman Empire, but were not given the chance to decide for themselves since Iraq was a product of "European powers." If this is accurate, then European nations have a horrible track record when it comes to dictating foreign boundaries that lead to unrest abroad. 

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How did Pakistan get it's name?

How did Pakistan get it's name? | Education in the world | Scoop.it

"The name of the country Pakistan has a fascinating history - it is essentially an acronym!  Prior to 1947, the country now known as Pakistan was a British colony. In 1947 the United Kingdom granted independence to the region under a new name, Pakistan. The name had been developed by a group of students at Cambridge University who issued a pamphlet in 1933 called Now or Never."


In a country with such great ethnic divisions, a common religion is a powerful nationalizing force.  As the capital city of Islamabad's toponym powerfully states (the house or abode of Islam), religion remains an important element of national identity for Pakistanis.   


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I have huge doubts about if this is how Pakistan got it’s name. About.com is just that a .com anyone can own one and say what they wish. I am not sure how legitimate the site is. If is true that it crazy 

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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 15, 2013 6:13 PM

In 1947 the United Kingdom granted independence to this region and named it Pakistan. The name was created by a group of students at Cambrige University and used the names of their homelands. Punjab, Afghania  Kashmir, Iran ,Sindh, Tukharistan, Afghanistan, Pakistan is an acronym! 

Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, November 14, 2013 6:06 AM

It is interesting to learn how particular countries got their names.  Pakistan was a British colony until 1947 and it was given the name Pakistan as an acronym for the 8 homelands in the country.  Pakistan is so ethnically divided that religion is really important for the country to stay together.

Brett Sinica's curator insight, November 19, 2013 11:27 AM

When you take in the way that the British Empire controlled many colonies and tried to spread their culture to such diverse regions, it is no suprise that Pakistan was named essentially by a game of Scrabble.  I suppose the naming is somewhat creative and certainly unique compared to how other countries get their names, yet just picturing a group of colleagues naming a country is strange.  Though the U.K. did grant them independance, how independant were they really if they weren't even given the right to name their own land.