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Latvia votes: Is Russian our language, too?

Latvia votes: Is Russian our language, too? | Education in the world | Scoop.it

I can understand their desire to hold on to their language as it makes them feel close to their heritage and nationality. However as pointed out in the article language alone does not promote patriotism. There are many other ways and forcing something on people will not help bring the community together.


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Nicholas Rose's comment, September 4, 2012 11:48 AM
This article is really interesting to read about. The reason why is because of the existence of the Soviet Union during World War II. Each Soviet Republic during that time had their own language and children were taught to speak Russian during school. Since the Soviet Union fell after the Cold War in 1991, all of the former Soviet Republics are free countries now and should be allowed to speak their official language instead of Russian.
Derek Ethier's comment, October 18, 2012 1:14 AM
It is definitely important for Latvians to hold on tightly to their culture. However, the Soviet Union caused Russian culture and language to spread throughout the USSR and countries are feeling the effects today. There are millions of Russians in former satellite nations who hold on to their Russian culture. At the same time, these nations wish to regain their national pride especially after the fall of the Soviet Union. It is a difficult conundrum, but I do agree with the Latvians' decision.
Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 15, 8:37 PM

It was interesting to read that in order to become a Latvian citizen you need to speak Latvian.I can see the point of view from both sides.Russian speaking residents want to be treated equally and Latvian citizens want to keep their cultural identity. However it does seem that there may be some deeper issues of discrimination that a unified language may not eliminate completely.

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The Russian Cross

The Russian Cross | Education in the world | Scoop.it

It is easy to see from this chart how the collapse of the USSR had on the population. With the collapse people no longer has a government system to help provide food and medical, which contributed to the growing death rate. People were most likely afraid to have children as they could not take care of them as they were barely able to survive themselves, which caused the low birthrates


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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 15, 3:15 PM

This shows how negative problems in Russia, like Alcoholism, suicide, crime, job loss etc negatively effect population growth. The Russian Cross shows how birthrates and death rates inverted during the collapse of communism. It looks to be stabilizing but this graph reflects how population geography can indicate societal characteristics.

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 15, 10:37 PM

There is a proliphic correlation between the fall of the Soviet Union and the population rate in Russia. Sometimes it takes statistical images to get a particular message across. With a decrease in male life expectancy,increase in alcoholism as well as an increase in suicide and crime is it is apparent the fall of the "Iron curtain" had an extensive shock wave. In a country with a small population in comparison to it's size this is a astronomical decline.

James Hobson's curator insight, October 20, 9:30 PM

(Russia topic 4)

The "Russian Cross" refers to the point at which Russia's population began to shrink. The number of births 'crossed' beneath the number of deaths occurring in a given period of time. Coinciding with the USSR's collapse, this decline in population hinted at a tougher future for the nation. More elderly and fewer young signify a greater dependency upon those who work, causing more of an economic strain. Ironically, this seems to echo the effects of the American 'baby boomers' as they have been approaching retiring age now. Though other factors are certainly involved, it is interesting to note how different situations as these can have such similar outcomes.

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Europe's failure to integrate Muslims

Europe's failure to integrate Muslims | Education in the world | Scoop.it

Although I feel people should be respectul of other cultures, religions and differenaces I also think that no one group should be given special treatment. Are other religious groups given prayer time at public schools? Are other people restriced from wearing religious articals if they have a public job? If countries are singling out Muslims thenI think the proublem is the countries however if Muslims are demanding special treatment then they are at fault.


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Shayna and Kayla's curator insight, February 6, 12:29 PM

This represents the religion section because Europe is restricting islamic symbols causing controversy .

Geography Jordan & Danielle's curator insight, February 7, 1:18 PM

Religion: freedom of religion is not a law is some parts of Europe 

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, October 23, 8:59 PM

The Muslim community was never really accepted in Europe looking back in history. Now more and emigrating and in mass numbers in certain areas.  While the European Union is a stronghold keeping Europe together, the argument can be made that the countries are falling apart in terms of identity, economy and production. A new wave of immigrants will not help increase their national identity and strength.

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Selling condoms in the Congo

TED Talks HIV is a serious problem in the DR Congo, and aid agencies have flooded the country with free and cheap condoms. But few people are using them. Why?

 

This video highlights why some well-intending NGOs with excellent plans for the developing world don't have the impact they are hoping for. Cultural barriers to diffusion abound and finding a way to make your idea resonate with your target audience takes some preparation. This also addresses some important demographic and health-related issues, so the clip could be used in a variety of places within the curriculum. FYI: this clip briefly shows some steamy condom ads.


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Marketing is not something I would have thought about when trying to get people in the Kongo to use condoms. Her research into the brands they use and why may save many lives.

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Derek Ethier's comment, November 5, 2012 2:26 PM
AIDs is an epidemic in Africa, so selling condoms in the Congo is a groundbreaking idea. In fact, I am surprised that no one had thought of this earlier. In a continent where millions are affected by AIDs, it is essential that measures be taken to prevent the spread of the deadly virus.
Nick Flanagan's curator insight, December 12, 2012 8:27 PM

I was surprised actually that it took this long for someone to think of this, given the fact that the AIDS crisis in Africa is practically a pandemic.However it is a good idea that someone had finally started to do something about it.  

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, November 13, 5:37 PM

This video explains the errors that a lot of NGOs make when attempting to help the developing world. While the NGOs have done a service providing condoms in the DRC, they lack appropriate marketing and merchandising for the product itself. In a way, the organizations need to eliminate their egos in the situation and allow for the product to be marketed appropriately.

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In Russia, a lack of men forces women to settle for less

In Russia, a lack of men forces women to settle for less | Education in the world | Scoop.it

I had no idea that domestic violence in Russia was such a large issue. I was also shocked to read there are no laws against domestic crimes. It is sad the women feel they need to be in a relationship and will not only put up with the violence but are also okay with infidelity. When the women should be coming together to support each other they are instead fighting and backstabbing to get one another’s man.


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Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 6:54 PM

This article is digusting and shocking.  The feminist in me flew at my screen when I read that domestic violence is "not only rampant...but accepted."  I feel indescribable pity for women who live in a country where they are required to live under the rule of a man, even when there are not enough to go around, so they are forced to settle for brutes who know how much power they wield over the women.  If it were acceptable for a woman to live as a single, independent individual, things would be much different but these girls who are held to lesser standards by their own culture have to suffer domestic violence and infidelity due to a shortage of men. 

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, October 18, 10:02 PM

When hearing of Russia's imbalance of men vs. women I did not think further into how much this fact could affect not only hetero relationships, but the relationships amongst the sexes themselves as well.  Morality is altered in this society where men are so scarce and are "shared" by the women.  It is known that Putin, a married man is married and has had a long term affair, and child with another  women.  The article states "no one really cares."  With our fair share of presidential affairs both in the far past and fairly recent, we see how unacceptable society finds such behavior.  But would the game change if all of sudden men were so scarce?  It is also disheartening that the female population is not united due to the lack of men.  

Jennifer Brown's curator insight, November 17, 11:21 AM

Talk about two different worlds! This kind or reminds me of the times when other countries would marry off their sons or daughters for a show of good faith and a means of connecting the two countries together. Except this wouldn't be for power it would be for survival. Would the "stronger" Russian woman be able to adapt to a Chinese way of living? They have the "obedienence" behind their husbands already, but the language and culture change might be a harsh reality for both the men of China and the women and Russia. Maybe Russia should adapt a Polyamorous way of life rather than these two countries coming together?

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NYTimes video: Sweden's Immigrant Identity

NYTimes video: Sweden's Immigrant Identity | Education in the world | Scoop.it

This reminds me of how many people in the US feel about Mexican Immigrants. And also how many Mexicans feel here. How and who do you identify with. In some ways it is good to identify with a place or country but I don’t feel it should define you. I do understand how frustrating it may be for those who are born in Sweden as the refuges can be a burden to the country as a whole. At the same time the refugees seem very grateful to be there.


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Brett Sinica's curator insight, October 8, 2013 3:08 PM

Sweden is currently one of the most prosperous countries in the world.  Being so close and accessible to many neighboring European countries makes it that much more appealing and even easier for people to travel there.  The birth rates have slowed in recent years, meaning people of working age are slowly decreasing; less workers and less jobs can lower the economy.  After the conflicts in Syria, Sweden has even volunteered to house refugees to start new and in turn can help put the demographic shift on the upswing.  With such an inviting atmosphere in the Scandinavian region, it's no wonder why there are so many citizens with immigrant backgrounds.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 17, 6:29 PM

This video is shows the changing demographics of Sweden. Sweden and several other wealthier countries of Europe are now destinations for immigrants where they were once the origin of them. The change is difficult for these nations as they are somewhat unprepared economically and politically for significant immigration.

 

The immigrants end up feeling unwanted in their new country and their old. This feeling of being unwanted is possibly worse than it would be in the United States, a country more accustomed to immigration.

Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, March 29, 8:07 PM

This growingly intense immigration situation parallels that of our own here in the U.S. and in many other countries throughout the world. World citizens, refugees, don't feel at home in their birth country nor do they feel welcomed in their current home or host country. This puts a lot of stress and pressure on these already punished populations. That's not to say that the host countries concerned citizens don't have a reason to be worried, but are their responses appropriate or productive?  

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Over 27 and unmarried? In China, you’re an old maid

Over 27 and unmarried? In China, you’re an old maid | Education in the world | Scoop.it
January and February are sweet times for most Chinese — they enjoy family reunions during the spring festival, which this year fell on January 23, and they celebrate Valentine’s Day, which is well-liked in China.

 

Gender roles in cultural norms change from country to country.  What also needs to be understood is how the demographic situation of a given country influences these patterns. 


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Seeing as how they have more men then women I am surprised they are not all married way before 27.

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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 9, 2013 1:22 PM

It is hard for Chinese women to attract men once they reach a certain age in Beijing it was reported in 2009 that there was 800,000 women 27 and unmarried and the number was rising. Many mothers of these women even argue with them or try to set them up with men they dont like. In the US women are getting married older and older and it is viewed as socially acceptable mainly because they are focusing on their carrers and making sure they are settled first. 

Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, October 21, 2013 1:05 PM

This article is interesting as it discusses one example of how gender roles and cultural norms differ from country to country.  Chinese women who are around 30 years old and single are referred to as "leftover girls".  Similar to a growing trend in the United States, Chinese women are focusing on their careers and their own goals and waiting to marry until they find the right person and have their own lives in order.  However, in the United States, this way of life for women is more socially acceptable whereas in China, it is not as acceptable for these "leftover girls".

Marissa Roy's curator insight, December 5, 2013 1:32 PM

It is interesting to see this as in American culture, marrying in your 20s is not a necessity anymore, it's almost unexpected. With so many men to choose from, these girls have time to find a man. The culture is going to shift as these ladies get married later in life.