Education in the world
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Education in the world
Education in different places of the world
Curated by Crissy Borton
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U.S. Travel To Cuba Grows As Restrictions Are Eased

I think it is ridiculous that the US restricted travel to Cuba. We are supposed to be a free country and citizens should be able to decide for themselves if they wish to visit Cuba. I think it is good the Obama administration is lifting regulations. It is even more ridiculous that the one place they restrict travel to is Cuba. You can go to North Korea which is far more dangerous to the US. Yes, Castro and his regime will try to make themselves look good to travelers but as one women who was interviewed said it is up to those who visit to dig deeper if they wish to learn the truth about Cubin politics.


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Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, February 14, 2015 7:40 PM

The growth between the U.S and Cuba has increased business wise from their past. Allowing tourists travel to Cuba is a slow process of Growth leading to more of an expansion in whatever business whether it be oil or goods to trade its a slow process of trust that's appearing between the two.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 6, 2015 8:21 PM

I think it is a good idea to have lifted restrictions on Cuba. We are talking about a restriction put on a country because of a Conflict called the Cold War, but the Cold War is long done now. It is also ridiculous that as a free country we are not allowed to travel there really without government approved sightseeing. Although the government approved sightseeing is informative for both culture and education, with less restrictions, people should be able to do stuff outside pre approved government tours. Being able to wander the country freely might even possibly boost economy from money being spent. 

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 11:50 AM

with the relaxing of restrictions towards Cuba an increase in tourism can obviously be expected to rise massively, especially as Cuban repatriates gain the ability to go and visit family and ancestral homes. this new policy will prove to be good for Cuba.

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In Honduras, Police Accused Of Corruption, Killings

I had no idea Honduras was worse it terms of violence then Mexico. How sad for the people of Honduras that the people who are supposed to protect them are adding to the violence. It is sad how the Unites States is playing into it buy giving aid to the police. We here in the US often wonder why people in other countries do not like us. I can see how this would anger and upset that people of Honduras who do not feel safe in their own country because of the corruption with the ploice


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Paige Therien's curator insight, February 11, 2014 1:36 PM

Honduras' role in the drug trafficking industry has increased immensely which does not mix well with their already corrupt government and police force.  However, a history of U.S. aid and security "support" is what rooted this country in violence.  Honduras' situation is spiraling out of control because the drug trafficking industry has taken advantage of its already weak state.

Amy Marques's curator insight, February 12, 2014 10:55 PM

In the news we sometimes hear about violence taking place at the border of the US and Mexico, but you never hear of the violence in Honduras. With a mix of drug trafficking, corruption, political instability and history has led to a murder rate that is now four times that of Mexico., which is pretty hard to think of since there Mexico already has a high muder right. The situation has gotten so bad that the Peace Corps has withdrawn its volunteers.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, September 24, 2015 6:53 AM

While Mexico gets all the bad press when it comes to violence and police corruption, Honduras is actually a  more violent place to be. The murder rate in the nation is four times that of Mexico. Like Mexico, the rule of law in Honduras is quite questionable. Most of the nations police force is corrupt. Many police officers are  on the payrolls of drug lords and gangs. Average citizens have no respect for law enforcement, which they view as an extension of the drug trade. A country without  the rule of law, will descend into anarchy. This situation is playing out in Honduras, to the detriment of its people.