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Education in the world
Education in different places of the world
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How They Found National Geographic's "Afghan Girl"

How They Found National Geographic's "Afghan Girl" | Education in the world | Scoop.it

She looks so much older then she really is. You can see her hard life on her face.


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Brian Nicoll's curator insight, December 12, 2012 12:28 AM

While the picture may be famous, she still represents depressing life that the women of her generation live.  I found it interesting that she had no idea that her photo was so iconic.  To have a photo taken of you that was used in for a variety of different things, all while not knowing about it is quite shocking.  As famous as the photo is however, it should not cloud the symbolism that the photo stands for. 

Paige McClatchy's curator insight, October 20, 2013 10:39 PM

I'm so glad that National Geographic found such an exotic specimen in the wild and that the US government graciously put its technology to use to catalog her..... seriously the Western fascination with the image of this Afghan woman, 1 of insanely many, is something I don't get. I think it makes us all feel "cultured" and "informed" when we can sit in the comfort of a dentist or doctor's waiting room and breeze through a Nat Geo cover to cover. A cheap thrill.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 10:38 AM

Her face was a publicity stunt. Her story is sad and is brutal. She was in a refugee camp but her story is only one of many. She didn't know she was the face of National Geographic and people have the image of her in their minds when they think of Aghani women.

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U.S. Obesity Trends

U.S. Obesity Trends | Education in the world | Scoop.it

It would be interesting to see the number of fast food places in each state and to compare them with the obesity rates. That of course bring up the question. Are they obese because of the fast food or is the fast food there because people eat it.


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Joshua Choiniere's comment, September 18, 2012 3:01 PM
According to this map obesity occurs all over but is more highly concentrated in the South and Mid West area such as Illinios and Michican. While states in the heartland have no "recorded data" and thus there trying to say they are not obese. I think this map is biased and not accurate because it's implied message is that Americans are not truly obese.
Paige McClatchy's curator insight, September 15, 2013 9:15 PM

The section about obesity and socioeconomic status was the most interesting to me, specifically that richer non-Hispanic blacks are more likely to be obese than their poorer counterparts while wealtheir women tend to be skinnier than poorer women. I've always understood obesity to be a problem largely driven by the nutrition of low-cost foods (McDonalds, KFC, etc.) yet these two statistics seem to contradict each other and require I take a more nuanced look at the epidemic. The fact that the South and the Midwest are leading the data in most obese does not come as a surprise to me. Stereotypes of Southern fried chicken and biscuits are coming to mind while my own experience of the Minnesota State Fair (everything on a stick!) makes the statistics jive with my own mindset. 

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Selling condoms in the Congo

TED Talks HIV is a serious problem in the DR Congo, and aid agencies have flooded the country with free and cheap condoms. But few people are using them. Why?

 

This video highlights why some well-intending NGOs with excellent plans for the developing world don't have the impact they are hoping for. Cultural barriers to diffusion abound and finding a way to make your idea resonate with your target audience takes some preparation. This also addresses some important demographic and health-related issues, so the clip could be used in a variety of places within the curriculum. FYI: this clip briefly shows some steamy condom ads.


Via Seth Dixon
Crissy Borton's insight:

Marketing is not something I would have thought about when trying to get people in the Kongo to use condoms. Her research into the brands they use and why may save many lives.

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Derek Ethier's comment, November 5, 2012 2:26 PM
AIDs is an epidemic in Africa, so selling condoms in the Congo is a groundbreaking idea. In fact, I am surprised that no one had thought of this earlier. In a continent where millions are affected by AIDs, it is essential that measures be taken to prevent the spread of the deadly virus.
Nick Flanagan's curator insight, December 12, 2012 8:27 PM

I was surprised actually that it took this long for someone to think of this, given the fact that the AIDS crisis in Africa is practically a pandemic.However it is a good idea that someone had finally started to do something about it.  

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, November 13, 5:37 PM

This video explains the errors that a lot of NGOs make when attempting to help the developing world. While the NGOs have done a service providing condoms in the DRC, they lack appropriate marketing and merchandising for the product itself. In a way, the organizations need to eliminate their egos in the situation and allow for the product to be marketed appropriately.

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Giant outdoor escalator built in Colombian shantytown

Not everyday you see an escalator outside in a poor community. I wish the video would have talked more about why and what they hope it helps the city with. I am sure the people are glad not to have to walk up and down the steep hill but I have to wonder who is going to maintain it and where will the money come from?


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James Hobson's curator insight, September 30, 9:38 AM

(south America topic 9)

Though controversial, it seems that the installation of this escalator system should have wide-reaching positive outcomes for the community which lives there.

- Less time commuting allows for more personal time, whether it be with family, one's trade, or just a well-needed break.

- The elderly and disabled will have better access to resources such as medicine and food which they might otherwise not be able to reach by foot.

- Tourists may find themselves wanting to explore the now more-accessible hillside. Aside from taking in the view, the community may benefit from the potential commerce opportunity by selling to such tourists ( food, drinks, souvenirs, crafts, etc.).

   Additionally, more transportation means more knowledge of these places, and increased awareness. Spreading the word about an issue is often half the battle itself, and first-hand experience is the most effective way to do so.

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 15, 9:46 PM

This escalator in a poor Colombian neighborhood may seem out of place but it serves as an important tool to these residents.

This stairway is an investment in their community. In an environment that already has it's difficulties,traveling up the steep mountain sides does not need to be one of them.Residents may look at this $7million investment in their community as hope. Hope that things can get better and that they can make positive changes that make a big difference.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 20, 11:20 AM

This escalator seems like a waste of money. I understand that it will make life easier for the locals and possible cut down crime. But I feel with $7 million the government is choosing to attack the symptoms of living in the shantytown rather than treating the cause of inequalities. Perhaps they could have opened up local markets, started some sort of commercially viable industry, or help educate citizens that could provide the community members with a way to get out of poverty rather than.just making it easier to live in these shantytowns.

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India's Census: Lots Of Cellphones, Too Few Toilets

The results of India's once-in-a-decade census reveal a country of 1.2 billion people where millions have access to the latest technology, but millions more lack sanitation and drinking water.

 

More Indians are entering the middle class as personal wealth is transforming South Asia's economy in the private sector.  Yet the government's ability to provide public services to match that growth still lags behind.  Why would it be that it is easier to get a cell phone than a toilet in India?  What will that mean for development?  


Via Seth Dixon
Crissy Borton's insight:

This reminds me of the childhood lessen about the difference between a need and a want. Instead of cell phones people should come together to help the government put in a sewer system. It is far more important than owning a cell phone or TV

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James Hobson's curator insight, November 11, 12:17 PM

(South Asia topic 1)

India is an example of how infrastructure can be viewed in different aspects. A growing cell network in which the majority of residents have phones hints at a strong infrastructure, while the majority of people not having access to toilets indicates the opposite. I believe this ironic situation has to do with the recent transition of India's economical focus towards the technology sector. If India for some reason had become a major pipeline producer, one could argue that the present-day access to phones and toilets would be reversed. Though the Indian middle-class seems to be gaining ground, it appears as if the government is focusing its attention to its upper-class, industrial regions. Though corruption and caste are definite factors, perhaps this is better than nothing; if India were to shift its focus away from its economical opportunity, many more may be left without both toilets and phones.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, November 19, 12:02 PM

This is an interesting NPR segment that highlights how some developing countries are do not have the government competency to keep up with the rapid growth of an economy. In India, cell phones are more easy to access than sewage systems and clean drinking water. The government which has been unable to keep up with the growing economy has begun to fail the rural populations of India. What is fascinating is that with this massive growth of a middle and upper middle class in India we are seeing a further marginalization of the poor and the government is unable to provide basic public sector goods to match the private sector growth.

Melissa Marie Falco-Dargitz's curator insight, November 23, 10:10 AM

Government in India may be ill equipped to handle the need for sewage, sanitation and clean water. These items are harder to come by than cell phones and televisions. Over 1/2 of the country lacks basic sanitation, but yet, have cell phones. This dystopia is leading to even people climbing out of poverty from having some of the basics needed for a healthy life.

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AIDS/HIV Video: Development and Disease

Justine Ojambo, co-founder of the SLF-funded project PEFO in Uganda, talks about losing his mother to AIDS and PEFO's work to support children orphaned by AI...

 

THis is a great video on AIDS/HIV in Africa.  So many show Africans as passive victims of global and environmental forces beyond their control, this one is of empowered and inspiring people seeking to change the world.  For more inspiration AIDS/HIVS videos from Africa, see: http://stephenlewisfoundation.org/news-resources/multimedia/video-clips


Via Seth Dixon
Crissy Borton's insight:

One thing that stuck out to me in this video is when he spoke about the making sure the children’s basic needs are met so they can concentrate on school. That is such a problem in our education system today that people don’t wish to address. I wonder how our education system would be if we made sure our children also had their basic needs met.

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Peter Siner's comment, November 16, 2011 10:08 PM
it seems as though there is little we can do to help help end this horrible plague in africa besides donate money or food , relgion is such a huge factor in their decision making process