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Border Economies: the Maquiladora Export Landscape

Border Economies: the Maquiladora Export Landscape | Education in the world | Scoop.it

Although it is good that jobs are coming into Mexico and helping to build areas of the country it is sad that companies are taking advantage of the people by offering lower wages them they would here in the US. The question becomes is any job better then no job?


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Derek Ethier's comment, September 20, 2012 10:15 PM
Developed countries outsourcing jobs has become largely beneficial for developing countries. In the case of Mexico, the residents are given new opportunities in manufacturing jobs that they may have never had before. The industrialization of the border area can only lead to increasing development and hopefully a better standard of living for citizens. Unfortunately, it has the exact opposite effect on the U.S., which is giving away jobs.
Joshua Choiniere's comment, September 26, 2012 11:14 AM
This article is displaying the postive and negative side effects that these Maquiladoras have upon the development of stronger economic economies for such countries as Mexico. These buisnesss that invest in the border of Mexico allow these towns/cities to grow and become industrilized. This provides low skill work for the people of Mexico but the logistics of the companies are still being done in the country that has invested in these places. This is good because it lets countries like the United States keep educated/high paying jobs in the States. The negative aspect is that the only jobs the Mexicans recieve are the low paying uneducated type. However still it has postives for both countries and its something we must get used to because its the way of the future.
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For Mexico City, a Repurposed Landfill

For Mexico City, a Repurposed Landfill | Education in the world | Scoop.it

Wow! What a great idea to use the gas from the landfill to power homes. Although it may only work for a few years it would still be doing something useful with the gas from the landfill. I wonder if they will design their next landfill to be use more energy.


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James Hobson's curator insight, September 28, 2014 9:41 PM

(Central America topic 8)

This article bears striking resemblance to the situation unfolding just a few blocks from my home: Johnston's Central Landfill.

The main similarity is with the use of methane gas for electricity production. Not only is this  a 'green' form of energy (natural decomposition), but it helps to prevent the foul odor of methane gas from spreading to nearby cities and towns. Before upgrading methane pumps at the Central Landfill, my neighborhood smelled like a dumpster most days. Now the air is cleaner and clean electricity is being produced... "two birds, one stone." Hopefully other landfills will take these examples to meaning in some way.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 14, 2014 4:20 PM

Usually when a landfill becomes overloaded, it just gets shut down and left to rot. Mexico City is trying to do something new and ingenious with its massive landfill. Instead of closing off the land and letting it stay as reusable space, Mexico is hoping to develop a way to harness landfill gases in order to make electricity. If it is successful, it could prove to be a world-changing solution for other large, developing cities. It has the potential of lowering energy costs, creating jobs, and finding a purpose for land that would otherwise remain unusable for probably centuries. 

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 16, 2014 7:58 AM

In class we discussed the numerous environmental issues that exist in Mexico City. This is a great way of turning a negative into a positive. On a larger scale, I think this is going to be the kind of solutions that every country will have to eventually find. Creative ways of using technology to turn harmful waste into energy is a great idea. Methane is a cleaner than coal and recycling lessens the burden on natural resources.

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For Mexicans Looking North, a New Calculus Favors Home

For Mexicans Looking North, a New Calculus Favors Home | Education in the world | Scoop.it

This article was surprising to me because the media and politicians make it seem as though more Mexicans are crossing into the United States. I think it is wonderful for Mexico that so many of its citizens are staying there now and working to make the country a better place for all to live. I cannot imagine what it is/was like for those who had to cross into the United States and leave their families so they could work and feed themselves and their families.


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Amy Marques's curator insight, February 12, 2014 1:14 PM

This article discusses how there is a significant decline of undocumented migration from Mexico into the United States.  Illegal immigration is becoming less attractive to Mexicans and they are deciding to stay in their country instead of coming to U.S. because Mexico is making some changes. It is expanding economic and educational opportunities in the cities. There is rising border crime, a major deterrent from emigrating, it is dangerous and expensive because of cartel controlled borders. Another change is the shrinking families. The manufacturing sector at the border is rising, democracy is better established, incomes have risen and poverty has declined. Also a tequila boom has taken place and has created new jobs for farmers cutting agave and for engineers at the stills.

 

James Hobson's curator insight, September 23, 2014 12:11 PM

(Mexico topic 4)

Unlike other articles and videos, this one seems to possess a different "tone" towards the recent drop in immigration. It seems to imply that the drop in immigration will be mutually beneficial to both the US and Mexico. Mexico would benefit from having more workers to help grow its emerging economy, and the US would have fewer Welfare dependents. I'm not saying that I necessarily agree or disagree with this viewpoint, but I do find it to be a very unique take on the situation. I wonder if the reduction in immigration into the US has allowed more funds to be diverted away from collection and deportation to an increased emphasis on security and patrol efforts? In other words, I think that it is a possibility that the United States was, figuratively speaking, too busy "scooping water from the boat" to get around to "plugging the leak".

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 16, 2014 9:31 PM

These statistics are drastically "left out" of the immigration conversation. There is little to no talk about the emigration in Mexico. Many people are wanting to stay where they are because conditions have improved.I believe if more people knew of this information than maybe we could look past this as such a hot button topic.

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Interactive maps Mexico-USA migration channels

Interactive maps  Mexico-USA migration channels | Education in the world | Scoop.it

I was surprised to see Chicago listed as #1 on this map, not somewhere in California or Texas. Although I am not surprised to see it listed in the top cities. Living near Chicago all my life I am aware of Chicago’s very large Hispanic population. Mexican culture plays a huge roll in Chicago and the Hispanic population is a very important part of the community. Unlike other cities they are not a minority in Chicago. There are many Hispanics involved in politics, and community programs.


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Jason Schneider's curator insight, February 3, 4:09 PM

When it comes to ethnic groups in the United States, many of the hispanic/mexican ancestors occur in the southwestern area of the United States. That's obviously because Mexico is southwest of the United States. When it comes to emigrating from Mexico, individuals immigrate to the United States (mostly southwest of the United States) so they can live a different, hopefully better economy. Plus, they try to escape the gang violence and drug violence in Mexico.

Alexa Earl's curator insight, March 14, 1:05 PM

This is a good representation of chain migration.

Devyn Hantgin's curator insight, April 3, 1:46 PM

Migration

This map show the most popular migratory flows of migration from Mexico to the US. 

This ties into our unit about migration because many Mexicans migrate to the US every year. This map shows the patterns and paths of the migration. 

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Drug war sparks exodus of affluent Mexicans

Drug war sparks exodus of affluent Mexicans | Education in the world | Scoop.it

I wonder why these people do not move to other areas of Mexico or try to help solve the drug issues going on. I do understand wanting to be safe however they are most likely in nicer areas unaffected by the drugs. It is sad when poorer people are choosing to stay in Mexico and not come to the United States and build and grown their own country that the wealthy would up and leave it.

 


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Amy Marques's curator insight, February 12, 2014 1:22 PM

Despite Mexico making improvements to make Mexicans want to stay below the border. The drug trafficking violence does make people want to leave. Tens of thousands of well-off Mexicans, wealthy businessmen and average Mexicans are fleeing Mexico and have moved north of the border in a quiet exodus, and they're being warmly welcomed, unlike the much larger population of illegal immigrants. Mexicans are fleeing cartel wars that have left more than 37,000 Mexicans dead in just 4 years, 

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 29, 2014 2:12 PM

This article is interesting because we were used to seeing poorer immigrants from Mexico looking for work and a new way of life.  However, the more affluent communities are migrating North to the U.S. and legally because of the turmoil of the drug wars in their country.  It is disappointing to see that drugs, violence and murder are pushing away people from their own country

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 3, 2014 1:23 PM

For more affluent Mexicans the ability to migrate north is much easier than for the poor. They have the money and the skills to move into the United States. Also with the open lines of communication and ease of flux with business over the border make moving to the U.S. an excellent way to avoid being caught in the cross fire among drug cartels. For the poor however they are either forced to find work with the cartel or risk being an innocent bystander. It also makes you think about the terminology we use to describe Mexican immigrants, are they not refugees of this drug war?