Education in the world
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Education in different places of the world
Curated by Crissy Borton
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Colombia's gold rush

Colombia's gold rush | Education in the world | Scoop.it

Greed once again seems to win in nations like this. Poor people suffer and lose their homes while companies and powerful people come in and strip the land and the people of their valuables. Sad

 

 

 


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Elizabeth Allen's comment, December 6, 2012 10:30 PM
Colombia's gold mines are bringing out greed in all nations. Civilian wars are breaking out over the gold. Native people are scared and fleeing their homes. The Colombian government has to watch closely over who is working the mines. The government does not want miners without licenses in the mines, because the government will not be paid royalties on the gold.
Al Picozzi's curator insight, September 29, 2013 4:58 PM

The war has now shifted from Cocaine to Gold.  Seems that alot of the planters when from planting cocaine to mining for gold...illegally according to the Columbian government.  The government is taking land from the native people and taking for themselves in order to get big business, especially foregin owned ones, to invest in their country.  Does it south familar.  It should.  1874, Black Hills in the then Dakota territory of the US.  Seems gold was found on Native American land..an expedition led by George Armstrong Custer confirmed gold was there...which led to..native Americans being forefully moved from their land into the Montana territory..which eventully led to the 1876 Great Sioux War in which Custer was killed and eventaully the Sioux and the Lakota and the Cheyenne being defeated by 1877.  Seems there is a parallel going on in South America.  Looks like the old axiom of those that do not learn history are doomed to repeat it proves itself correct again.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 20, 2014 11:58 AM

In countries where the government is not as stable as most, the demand for gold makes people willing to literally go to war over mines in Colombia. In the 1990s there was a large outrage about "blood diamonds" out of Africa. This reminds me of that. In the developing world we are seeing horrible circumstances arising to gain wealth and provide a valuable commodity to the highest bidders. 

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Taming the City of God

Taming the City of God | Education in the world | Scoop.it

It was great to see that the police force and is reaching out to the community and changing the people’s prospective of them. It was heartwarming to see the young man who was so angry about his brothers death learn that all the officers are not the same. I hope the efforts by the police will continue after the Olympics


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James Hobson's curator insight, September 30, 2014 9:08 AM

(South America topic 7)

The details pertaining to how Rio's police force has been regaining control in favelas surprised me, but in a positive way. For example, having officers work and volunteer with children is a great idea to stop the generation chain of fearing the police as the enemy. I believe the message that this communicates is that the police are human too, sharing many of the same aspirations as those who they serve. It's unfortunate that this ramping-up in force comes mainly because of the approaching Olympics, but at least it is still a step in the right direction.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 20, 2014 12:42 PM

This video shows the tense relationship between the favales and the government of Brazil. I can't help but notice how people in the favales are being treated as lesser citizens that are not part of the collective identity of Brazil. As these big sporting events draw near, the government is more concerned with hiding or eliminating the systemic inequalities that are occurring in the favales. If I lived in these areas I would find it hard not to see the government as an enemy.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 7, 2015 12:10 PM
I think that it is very good that tensions between the police and the citizens of the city are cooling down. Yes, there were many problems in the past, but that is the past, now there is just the present and future. With police being more active in the community responding to calls more frequently, or attending schools to show that not all of them are bad people. It is also good to know that an officer holds a martial arts program for the kids, something like that really gets people, especially the young to feel safe around them. Also, with schooling and environmental projects becoming much better, it seems as if the City of God is going in the correct path that it should.
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In Venezuela Housing Crisis, Squatters Find 45-Story Walkup

In Venezuela Housing Crisis, Squatters Find 45-Story Walkup | Education in the world | Scoop.it

It is amazing that these people all came together to build their own community in the unfinished building. I commend them for helping each other out and trying to make the best of the situation and to use the resources like this building to be able to live and care for their families. It is sad though that the government does not work with these people to maybe finish the building


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Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 5:34 PM

The video we watched of the squatters living in an unfinished skyscraper was unlike anything I've ever seen before. In a country with such high population rates and a housing shortage, people have gotten creative and made homes in this 45 story building where they share what would have been office spaces and bathrooms.  Over 2,500 people have moved into the dilapidated skyscraper and made a home out of it for their families. They have rigged electricity that the government does not provide for them and built small stores on almost every floor.  The people have not been evicted because the government of Venezuela knows of the housing shortages, yet does not fix it.  

I feel ashamed that a country with so many oil resources has such high rates of poverty and no one is fixing it.  It shows the corruption in the government through an extreme although innovative example.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, February 17, 2014 10:46 AM

The problems in Venezuela with housing and the lack of response to the problem by the government has led people to become squatters.  The using of the abandoned buildings was a good idea by the original squatters.  The vacant buildings can house many of the countries it is a shame that the government did not think of this solution to the housing problem and vacant building first, if they had, they could have made sure they were safer for the residence.  The idea of a vertical city springing up in this building is also an interesting one.  Not only are squatters living in these buildings but creating businesses and other services for the residence.

Jess Deady's curator insight, February 18, 2014 1:02 PM

In life, I constantly find myself comparing situations with what I read and what I know. Imagine this skyscraper is the Prudential in Boston. How could something meant to be so great fall to its death (and to peoples literal deaths)? One day there is a massive financial building occupied with bankers and lavishness. The next day there is a skyscraper in the form of a house. Housing shortages are happening everywhere and Venezuela is being hit hard in this situation. Imagine visiting this country and asking where someone lives? "Oh, I live in the Tower of David, which used to mean a whole lot more."

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U.S. Travel To Cuba Grows As Restrictions Are Eased

I think it is ridiculous that the US restricted travel to Cuba. We are supposed to be a free country and citizens should be able to decide for themselves if they wish to visit Cuba. I think it is good the Obama administration is lifting regulations. It is even more ridiculous that the one place they restrict travel to is Cuba. You can go to North Korea which is far more dangerous to the US. Yes, Castro and his regime will try to make themselves look good to travelers but as one women who was interviewed said it is up to those who visit to dig deeper if they wish to learn the truth about Cubin politics.


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Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, February 14, 2015 7:40 PM

The growth between the U.S and Cuba has increased business wise from their past. Allowing tourists travel to Cuba is a slow process of Growth leading to more of an expansion in whatever business whether it be oil or goods to trade its a slow process of trust that's appearing between the two.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 6, 2015 8:21 PM

I think it is a good idea to have lifted restrictions on Cuba. We are talking about a restriction put on a country because of a Conflict called the Cold War, but the Cold War is long done now. It is also ridiculous that as a free country we are not allowed to travel there really without government approved sightseeing. Although the government approved sightseeing is informative for both culture and education, with less restrictions, people should be able to do stuff outside pre approved government tours. Being able to wander the country freely might even possibly boost economy from money being spent. 

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 11:50 AM

with the relaxing of restrictions towards Cuba an increase in tourism can obviously be expected to rise massively, especially as Cuban repatriates gain the ability to go and visit family and ancestral homes. this new policy will prove to be good for Cuba.

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Border Economies: the Maquiladora Export Landscape

Border Economies: the Maquiladora Export Landscape | Education in the world | Scoop.it

Although it is good that jobs are coming into Mexico and helping to build areas of the country it is sad that companies are taking advantage of the people by offering lower wages them they would here in the US. The question becomes is any job better then no job?


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Derek Ethier's comment, September 20, 2012 10:15 PM
Developed countries outsourcing jobs has become largely beneficial for developing countries. In the case of Mexico, the residents are given new opportunities in manufacturing jobs that they may have never had before. The industrialization of the border area can only lead to increasing development and hopefully a better standard of living for citizens. Unfortunately, it has the exact opposite effect on the U.S., which is giving away jobs.
Joshua Choiniere's comment, September 26, 2012 11:14 AM
This article is displaying the postive and negative side effects that these Maquiladoras have upon the development of stronger economic economies for such countries as Mexico. These buisnesss that invest in the border of Mexico allow these towns/cities to grow and become industrilized. This provides low skill work for the people of Mexico but the logistics of the companies are still being done in the country that has invested in these places. This is good because it lets countries like the United States keep educated/high paying jobs in the States. The negative aspect is that the only jobs the Mexicans recieve are the low paying uneducated type. However still it has postives for both countries and its something we must get used to because its the way of the future.
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Brazil's economy overtakes UK's

Brazil's economy overtakes UK's | Education in the world | Scoop.it

When I think if Brazil I think of drug wars and rainforests. I have never thought of it as a global economy powerhouse.


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Cam E's curator insight, February 11, 2014 11:46 AM

BRIC has always interested me as an alternative to the traditional centers of economic power. The four BRIC countries are all powerful up and comers and their positioning all around the world and lack of cultural commonality make them a very intriguing force.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 20, 2014 11:55 AM

The rise of the BRIC countries shows that the global economy is changing due to globalization. Now that transportation is cheaper, communication is more fluid, and economies can intermingle easier than before, countries can be more competitive with previous economic powers. I find it interesting that it is likely that in the next century we will see the US slipping further down this list.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 1, 2015 8:01 AM

While this may seem surprising, this event should not be taken as such. Countries such as China, Russia, India and Brazil are becoming more powerful with the passing of each day. The biggest challenges to the United States are China and Russia. They are the only nations who can compete with us on both a political and economic scale. Russia is currently causing the most issues. Putin is an agitator on the world stage. I truly believe that it is his desire to recreate the great Russian Empire of old. His continued medaling around the globe will be a serious threat for the foreseeable future. China is the longer term threat. They are the only ones who possess the economic abilities to compete with us. Brazil and India, while growing are still not any were near us in terms of political or economic strength. Our government should do all it can, to foster good relationships with these nations. Especially sense are relationships with China and Russia are problematic at the moment.

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Giant outdoor escalator built in Colombian shantytown

Not everyday you see an escalator outside in a poor community. I wish the video would have talked more about why and what they hope it helps the city with. I am sure the people are glad not to have to walk up and down the steep hill but I have to wonder who is going to maintain it and where will the money come from?


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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 20, 2014 11:20 AM

This escalator seems like a waste of money. I understand that it will make life easier for the locals and possible cut down crime. But I feel with $7 million the government is choosing to attack the symptoms of living in the shantytown rather than treating the cause of inequalities. Perhaps they could have opened up local markets, started some sort of commercially viable industry, or help educate citizens that could provide the community members with a way to get out of poverty rather than.just making it easier to live in these shantytowns.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 2014 7:09 PM

This is an interesting idea simply because of the discussion that can arise from it. Would the construction of this escalator actually benefit the people living within the slum to any foreseeable degree? On one hand some claim that yes it will have a positive impact as it could cut back on the number at attacks and muggings of those stopping to catch their breath as well as simply allowing them to conserve energy. While those on the other side of the issue say that the benefit the escalator my bring doesn't out weigh the cost of building it. Simply throwing money at a situation like this wont actually bring any relief. 

Kendra King's curator insight, February 8, 2015 4:40 PM

I sincerely believe that was a waste of money. Sure people can now get out of the area in “6 minutes” instead of “30 minutes” which, as was mentioned in class, can get people out of the area so as to get to jobs quicker. However what good does that really do in the grand scheme of things? Do the citizens still have poor jobs? Are their homes unsafe? Are there still sanitation issues? I am pretty sure the answer is yes, to all of the above. Clearly, these issues are more pressing than an escalator. So even if investing in an area can benefit a population, I think the improvement could have been greater because there are other more pressing needs of the area where the money could have been invested. 

 

I am actually surprised people were happy with the new addition. Given that it was a short clip, not all sides were seen. However, I feel that once people get over the novelty of the new toy and back to the reality of their everyday situation tensions could raise. Especially if the outdoor elevator breaks down, which is bound to happen given its exposure to mother nature, as the escalator just adds more of  a maintenance cost in a place that doesn't seem to have money. It wouldn't surprise me if people were later angered by the addition. In fact, I am actually surprised their wasn't protests that stopped the escalator from being built in the first place.  

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Brazilian Ethanol

Brazilian Ethanol | Education in the world | Scoop.it

To many times we put our convenience and cost before the environment. To me this is yet another example. With all the technology out there it is still me start looking at ways to bring down cost without killing the world.

 

 


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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 8, 2014 11:25 AM

Brazil is taking advantage of its natural resources to make themselves competitive in the global market. Today geography can change the shape of the economics around the globe. The prospect of economic growth and energy competitiveness has made them short sighted.  Brazil has to beware of becoming a mono-commodity country that relies on a business that is not sustainable.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 2014 7:35 PM

While only Brazil is taking part in this and it hasn't completely replaced gasoline it is without a doubt a step in the right direction that hopefully other nations can learn from. While the hypotheses over how much oil fluctuates it is undeniable it isn't a permanent solution, the future of fuel must lie in renewal resources. Unfortunately oil companies hold so much sway in politics its unknown how much change is actually possible today. Regardless of this hopefully one day the world as a whole will realize this and seek to emulate Brazil's in innovation.

Taylor S's curator insight, March 23, 7:58 PM

It is being said that the use of Brazilian, sugarcane produced ethanol is an effective means of self-sustainable energy, more officiant then the corn produced products. the reason this relates to my 5 year plan is due to the proposal that this energy can be used to reduce the emissions given off by different industries and provide clean energy. I believe that this is important as it would reduce the type of impact these organisations have on the environment.

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In Honduras, Police Accused Of Corruption, Killings

I had no idea Honduras was worse it terms of violence then Mexico. How sad for the people of Honduras that the people who are supposed to protect them are adding to the violence. It is sad how the Unites States is playing into it buy giving aid to the police. We here in the US often wonder why people in other countries do not like us. I can see how this would anger and upset that people of Honduras who do not feel safe in their own country because of the corruption with the ploice


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Paige Therien's curator insight, February 11, 2014 1:36 PM

Honduras' role in the drug trafficking industry has increased immensely which does not mix well with their already corrupt government and police force.  However, a history of U.S. aid and security "support" is what rooted this country in violence.  Honduras' situation is spiraling out of control because the drug trafficking industry has taken advantage of its already weak state.

Amy Marques's curator insight, February 12, 2014 10:55 PM

In the news we sometimes hear about violence taking place at the border of the US and Mexico, but you never hear of the violence in Honduras. With a mix of drug trafficking, corruption, political instability and history has led to a murder rate that is now four times that of Mexico., which is pretty hard to think of since there Mexico already has a high muder right. The situation has gotten so bad that the Peace Corps has withdrawn its volunteers.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, September 24, 2015 6:53 AM

While Mexico gets all the bad press when it comes to violence and police corruption, Honduras is actually a  more violent place to be. The murder rate in the nation is four times that of Mexico. Like Mexico, the rule of law in Honduras is quite questionable. Most of the nations police force is corrupt. Many police officers are  on the payrolls of drug lords and gangs. Average citizens have no respect for law enforcement, which they view as an extension of the drug trade. A country without  the rule of law, will descend into anarchy. This situation is playing out in Honduras, to the detriment of its people.

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For Mexico City, a Repurposed Landfill

For Mexico City, a Repurposed Landfill | Education in the world | Scoop.it

Wow! What a great idea to use the gas from the landfill to power homes. Although it may only work for a few years it would still be doing something useful with the gas from the landfill. I wonder if they will design their next landfill to be use more energy.


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Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 14, 2014 4:20 PM

Usually when a landfill becomes overloaded, it just gets shut down and left to rot. Mexico City is trying to do something new and ingenious with its massive landfill. Instead of closing off the land and letting it stay as reusable space, Mexico is hoping to develop a way to harness landfill gases in order to make electricity. If it is successful, it could prove to be a world-changing solution for other large, developing cities. It has the potential of lowering energy costs, creating jobs, and finding a purpose for land that would otherwise remain unusable for probably centuries. 

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 16, 2014 7:58 AM

In class we discussed the numerous environmental issues that exist in Mexico City. This is a great way of turning a negative into a positive. On a larger scale, I think this is going to be the kind of solutions that every country will have to eventually find. Creative ways of using technology to turn harmful waste into energy is a great idea. Methane is a cleaner than coal and recycling lessens the burden on natural resources.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 11:31 AM

this is a genius use of a necessary evil [landfills]. in the modern world energy is necessary, and the use of methane from a landfill means that the fuel is cheap, and that cost will transfer to the cost of power for the people buying it.