Education in the world
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Education in the world
Education in different places of the world
Curated by Crissy Borton
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NYTimes video: Turkey's E.U. application

NYTimes video: Turkey's E.U. application | Education in the world | Scoop.it

With the weakening euro and economies the EU should be thankful to have Turkey want to join them. They could help weakened the EU also having diversity in governments involved in the EU may help with ideas and growth.


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Elizabeth Allen's comment, December 6, 2012 11:58 PM
Turkey has made changes that should make her more attractive to the European Union. Turkey has done away with the death penalty and is more generous with women's rights. While it is not geographically in Europe, its location is profitable for commerce etc.
Al Picozzi's curator insight, October 9, 2013 5:48 PM

Could this be just a matter of what it means to be European and that some Europeans feel that Turkey just doesn't fit??  Turkey has long been an ally of the West since its admission in NATO.  It fact along with the US, UK and Greece it sent major forces to Korea during the Korean War.  It helped stop the USSR from spreading, during the cold war, when it joined NATO and toady it has the second largest standing army in NATO, behind the US.   It has also been a help to the US and Europe in conflicts in Iraq and Afganistan.  To be part of the European Union only makes logical sense and economic sense.  Access to Asian markets given its geographical location and just the opening of the Turkish domestic markets to free trade.  Seems that old prejudices of what it means to be European is rearing its ugly head..last time this prejudice gained momentum of what it means to be something in Europe...Hitler!

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 8, 2014 11:47 AM

Turkey wanting to join the EU will change political geography drastically. Turkey would provide the EU with a border town with the middle east as well as add power and span of the European Union. With some countries like Greece showing that EU economies are dependent on one another and I'm not sure that makes Turkey an attractive or unattractive prospect.

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Devolution: A Beginner's Guide

Devolution: A Beginner's Guide | Education in the world | Scoop.it

I wish the video and article was more clearly cut and easier to understand. I get that this is about England giving more power sections of the UK but it did not help me in learning more about the situation.


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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 8, 2014 11:44 AM

The parliament in London is shifting more power to Scotland and other areas in what is called devolution.  This reflects a push for more independence of countries in the UK that are not England. In order to keep the UK together concessions must be made, this devolution is the British Parliament's efforts to keep the UK intact.

Miles Gibson's curator insight, February 11, 2015 9:30 AM

Unit 4 political geography 

This picture explains how devolution works and provides a specific example with the breaking down of power of the imperialist England and it's control into an equally represented United Kingdom. This is an example of devolution at it's best.

This picture relates to unit 4 because it shows how devolution, which is a major part of unit 4, works. It explains it's parts and gives specific geographic examples as in the U.K. this overall relates to unit 4.

Matthew Connealy's curator insight, March 22, 2015 4:04 PM

Devolution is the transfer of powers from a central government to more regional power, in this case, the UK. The UK devolved its powers to England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales. These countries have had independent parliaments since 1997. Some "reserved powers" have not been devolved from the UK such as foreign affairs, military defense, international and  economic policies. This change of power has stirred questions on public spending and tax policies, and is still a debate and event to keep your eye on.

 

I feel that devolution has many benefits that outweigh the negative consequences such as money spending. Countries can function in a more independent manner and govern themselves within their defined boundaries in a more efficient way. This topic and article gives greater insight to our political unit and provides great insight for each country's respective parliament.

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Europe according to Estonians

This was a fun video to watch even though it was filled with stereotypes. It was helpful in pointing a few places out!


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Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 2014 7:28 PM

Obviously done in jest this video shows that while incorrect many define nations and their inhabitants with simple and overarching ideas. Here in America and much of the world we apply these stereotypes to whole nations because its far easier to do so than actually break down the identity of a nation and draw parallels to ourselves. While these stereotypes aren't always harmful in some cases they can definitely be considered offensive.

Rachel Phillips's curator insight, May 7, 2015 1:37 PM

while this really isn't at all educational, except for maybe getting a feel for where countries are located, it makes some good points.  By good points I mean it shows exactly why a class like geography is important, or else we would all classify countries by stereotypes like the ones in this video.  i think it also makes a point that we already do this, especially in America, we have stereotypes for just about everyone, but many Americans aren't very educated in anything about the places we are stereotyping.  Honestly, this video makes me glad I'm taking geography, because while a lot of people don't understand that geography is more than maps, it has taught me so much about the world.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 7, 2015 2:18 PM
first off this video is very funny. This video shows a lot of bias and personal views on the world based on other views from countries. Stereotypes that are emphasized in this video are true though. As American students, we view the world on what America thinks of it, it is a class like this that really helps us to understand the world outside of how we view it. It is interesting though to see how people from an other country view the world.
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NYTimes video: Sweden's Immigrant Identity

NYTimes video: Sweden's Immigrant Identity | Education in the world | Scoop.it

This reminds me of how many people in the US feel about Mexican Immigrants. And also how many Mexicans feel here. How and who do you identify with. In some ways it is good to identify with a place or country but I don’t feel it should define you. I do understand how frustrating it may be for those who are born in Sweden as the refuges can be a burden to the country as a whole. At the same time the refugees seem very grateful to be there.


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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 17, 2014 6:29 PM

This video is shows the changing demographics of Sweden. Sweden and several other wealthier countries of Europe are now destinations for immigrants where they were once the origin of them. The change is difficult for these nations as they are somewhat unprepared economically and politically for significant immigration.

 

The immigrants end up feeling unwanted in their new country and their old. This feeling of being unwanted is possibly worse than it would be in the United States, a country more accustomed to immigration.

Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, March 29, 2014 8:07 PM

This growingly intense immigration situation parallels that of our own here in the U.S. and in many other countries throughout the world. World citizens, refugees, don't feel at home in their birth country nor do they feel welcomed in their current home or host country. This puts a lot of stress and pressure on these already punished populations. That's not to say that the host countries concerned citizens don't have a reason to be worried, but are their responses appropriate or productive?  

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 8, 2014 11:29 AM

Europe is a place that makes traveling to different countries relatively easy. This makes sense that their would be migration that is inter-european. 

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The Difference between the United Kingdom, Great Britain and England Explained

I had to watch more then once and rewind a few parts but this was very helpful in explaning the differance between the 3.


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Al Picozzi's curator insight, October 7, 2013 12:10 AM

A great and entertaining way to explain this part of Europe.  I know I have in the past used the terms England, Great Britain and the United Kingdom to all refer to the same thing. It was also amazing to see that people are the same everywhere in that the people in Wales do not consider themselves British, much the same way the people in Sicily consider themselves Sicilain and not Italian. 

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 8, 2014 12:09 PM

As an outsider looking in the concept of the United Kingdom is a little confusing. We are taught to view Scotland as its own country, but they are countries within a larger structure. This video makes what would confuse many Americans and condenses it into a clear video that is just about 5 mins.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 12, 2014 4:38 PM

Many people often interchange the UK, Great Britain, and England, but in reality, they all describe different different things. The UK is a country of four countries, each with equal power, including Scotland, Northern Ireland, England, and Wales but they are all considered British citizens.UK is a political term, describing a country. Great Britain is a physical geographical term describing the land mass containing Scotland, Wales, and England.  The British Isles refers to both Great Britain and the Island of Ireland. All of these terms describe different things, being characterized by either political affiliation or geographic characteristics. 

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Decades After Siege, Sarajevo Still Divided

  How sad that the country is still divided and the politicians are a huge part of the issue. I wonder how long countries and continue to be divided before someone says enough is enough. How many lives have to be lost before people see no one is winning?

 


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Devon marzo's curator insight, February 6, 2014 12:37 PM

This article show political because the population is protesting against the government 

Joshua Mason's curator insight, March 17, 2015 9:36 PM

It's interesting to see a country's government want to maintain ethnic divides rather than bridge the gap between the two groups. This reminds me of a portion of my Anthropology class last semester on the Rwandan Genocide. Afterwards, the new government attempted to bring everyone together and tried to erase the racial differences that caused the conflict in the first place. It did this in an attempt to solidify power and to gain further control. In my mind, I see this reaction as the more logical one than keeping the races at odds with each other. Judging by their own smaller "Occupy" movement and from the commentary within the article, it seems that some in the country are ready to put past old feelings and become united as a country.

Peyton Conner's curator insight, April 8, 2016 9:45 AM
I find this article very interesting due to the reason that after all the fighting and killing that has happened between these three ethnic groups, that they now want to team up to stop their corrupt government. Though the question is can they put their differences aside to work together ? PC
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Venice sinking five times faster than thought?

Venice sinking five times faster than thought? | Education in the world | Scoop.it

I never though about Venice sinking until I read this article although I have wondered of buildings to not corrode in the water. I also never thought about possible flooding issues in the city although it makes sense that it could be an issue. It is weird to think about such a beautiful city one day being sunk


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Brett Sinica's curator insight, October 8, 2013 3:36 PM

Day to day, even looking into next year the rate of 2 millimeters per year may not seem drastic.  To a city that has been around for hundreds of years, it's assumed the city plans to stay standing for hundreds more.  Considering the age of the city, say in a couple hundred more years, some buildings could begin to take in water.  It is also possible that certain parts of the city could be sinking faster than others.  There is a similar situation in Mexico City where it was built on a lake and each year that source diminishes due to the demand of water by its residents.  Certain parts of the city are sinking and some buildings are slanted due to the results.  These cities are beautiful  but reality shows that as time passes, it will probably only get worse.  Hopefully preventions can be taken to at least reduce the speed of sinking so that people after us can appreciate the architecture and atmosphere the city has provided all these years.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 8, 2014 12:11 PM

Venice is a city that capitalized on its geography and developed canals so the city could grow despite being so close to sea level. Now that sea levels are rising, Venice is in trouble because its survival is dependent on the water levels, as they become out of control Venice will not be able to withstand the change. There are similar circumstances like in the Maldives where global warming and rising sea levels will put entire countries under water.

Kendra King's curator insight, February 15, 2015 6:58 PM

As you mentioned in class, we are living on constantly moving land features. In the case of Venice, the water is moving in on the city so it is actually sinking and has been for quite some time. What is new to the equation is that it might be sinking “five times more than” originally “calculated or “7.8 inches every hundred years.” I say might be because there are others who quibble about this new find, saying it is inaccurate. Also, there is a damn project in the works to try and combat the sinking. While I am happy that the city is working on slowing the process, I am curious to know what their solution is going to be when the city finally does go under. As I was reading this all I could think of was saving all the rich art and history that this Italian city is famous for. In some ways it is great that the city knows ahead of time that it is sinking because they have time to plan a way to save the important aspects of the city. On another hand though, the city is so below sea level that a natural disaster could cause far more damage than anyone could have foreseen. I just hope that doesn’t happen anytime soon because Venice is definitely on my bucket list.  

 

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Extreme Sports +Beautiful Landscapes

Beautiful landscapes! No way would I do what those people are doing but wow such beautiful footage!


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Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, March 6, 2015 11:09 PM

The physical aspect of the physical geography in this piece shows alot of the beauty side. from valleys, cliff faces, this man knows how to enjoy himself, as he glides across the beautiful landscapes.

Rachel Phillips's curator insight, May 7, 2015 1:49 PM

This must be an experience unlike any other. You will never get to see the world like this any other way.. unless you ride Soarin' at Disney World, but I would imagine this is a little less expensive, and a little more thrilling, not to mention much more beautiful.

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:47 PM

The really cool thing about this is that having extreme sporats in this area is also a way to see how incredible the landscapes really are. It's a combination of two amazing aspects in life that show how the land was formed and how sports can be a way to view this incredible area.

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Europe's failure to integrate Muslims

Europe's failure to integrate Muslims | Education in the world | Scoop.it

Although I feel people should be respectul of other cultures, religions and differenaces I also think that no one group should be given special treatment. Are other religious groups given prayer time at public schools? Are other people restriced from wearing religious articals if they have a public job? If countries are singling out Muslims thenI think the proublem is the countries however if Muslims are demanding special treatment then they are at fault.


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Geography Jordan & Danielle's curator insight, February 7, 2014 1:18 PM

Religion: freedom of religion is not a law is some parts of Europe 

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, October 23, 2014 8:59 PM

The Muslim community was never really accepted in Europe looking back in history. Now more and emigrating and in mass numbers in certain areas.  While the European Union is a stronghold keeping Europe together, the argument can be made that the countries are falling apart in terms of identity, economy and production. A new wave of immigrants will not help increase their national identity and strength.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, September 9, 2015 2:58 PM

I feel that the rejection of any attempt to integrate Islam into European society is, at least in part, a reaction to the declining native population of most of the major Western European nations. They are attempting to keep anyone they cant assimilate out, while insuring that any Muslims that they can assimilate are dressing and acting close enough to the existing culture so as to blend into their native population.