Education in the world
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Education in the world
Education in different places of the world
Curated by Crissy Borton
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The world map of chocolate (made out of chocolate)

The world map of chocolate (made out of chocolate) | Education in the world | Scoop.it
You may be focussing on chocolate over the weekend - but where does it come from? A global trade analysed. In chocolate (this is what maps are made for!

 

What is the geography of chocolate like?  There is a dark side (no pun intended) to the production of cocoa in many places such as West Africa. 


Via Seth Dixon
Crissy Borton's insight:

Very cool map. I have never really paid attention to where my chocolate came from before. 

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Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 5, 2014 11:06 AM

I hope the production keep growing up. We need more chocolate and specially in Africa. 

Brendan Cooke's curator insight, August 16, 2016 11:16 PM

This artical is about the origin of where cocoa beans are harvested from and sent to around the world. It also adds the amount of cocoa beans harvested in each area.It is a quick overview of where the transportation of cocoa beans starts.


The page is an excellent site for quickly reviewing where cocoa beans are grown and transported from.


The site is relevant to my page because it informs the reader of where cocoa originates and the quantities it's farmed in.

Tennille Houghton's curator insight, August 28, 2016 3:22 AM
this is just about the production and how its changed from where it originally comes from 
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Taking Root: The Vision of Wangari Maathai

Taking Root tells the dramatic story of Kenyan Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Wangari Maathai whose simple act of planting trees grew into a nationwide movement ...

 

Community, agriculture, gender, politics and the environment... it's all here in this inspiring clip.  


Via Seth Dixon
Crissy Borton's insight:

This is such an inspiring video. All it took was for one women, Wangari Maathai, to have an idea and to stand up for that idea for change to take place. How cool that from that one women a government was changed at 35 million trees planted!

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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 13, 2014 11:31 AM

Maathai is an incredible woman. Her efforts are improving the environment and agriculture in Africa. Another interesting note on her story is that she partnered with a Norwegian group to start the greenbelt movement, showing how globalization can also apply to shared efforts to do good.

Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, March 19, 2015 1:56 PM

This is an incredible peace of Wangari Maathai, who is from the same country i am from Kenya, and she had a powerful movement from a simple act of planting trees in hope of helping her environment, and women was looked at as a fool and looked down upon, she is an icon and vision able leader amongst most Kenyan women today. She created a path for most of the young girls and had her clear message was to protect your environment, create paths and a future for yourself, she is an icon and her movement will continue to impact not only my life but others globally.

Joshua Mason's curator insight, March 31, 2015 8:22 PM

Land is a pretty valuable thing. As are civil rights. When a women, a gender traditionally looked upon as inferior in Kenya, takes a bunch of other women and starts a movement to plant trees so they could better the lives of all in the country, she tends to be looked down upon by the government. Maathai even attracted the attention of the Kenyan President who dismissed her as just some women. Her tree planting initiative eventually lead to nationwide movements that lead to demise of that very president that dismissed her movement as a waste of time and effort.

 

When we watched this clip in class, I was amazed by not only her bravery to stand up to such a ruler but by her devotion to something so simple as wanting to plant trees so the people of Kenya had food to eat and fuel to cook with.

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Selling condoms in the Congo

TED Talks HIV is a serious problem in the DR Congo, and aid agencies have flooded the country with free and cheap condoms. But few people are using them. Why?

 

This video highlights why some well-intending NGOs with excellent plans for the developing world don't have the impact they are hoping for. Cultural barriers to diffusion abound and finding a way to make your idea resonate with your target audience takes some preparation. This also addresses some important demographic and health-related issues, so the clip could be used in a variety of places within the curriculum. FYI: this clip briefly shows some steamy condom ads.


Via Seth Dixon
Crissy Borton's insight:

Marketing is not something I would have thought about when trying to get people in the Kongo to use condoms. Her research into the brands they use and why may save many lives.

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Derek Ethier's comment, November 5, 2012 2:26 PM
AIDs is an epidemic in Africa, so selling condoms in the Congo is a groundbreaking idea. In fact, I am surprised that no one had thought of this earlier. In a continent where millions are affected by AIDs, it is essential that measures be taken to prevent the spread of the deadly virus.
Nick Flanagan's curator insight, December 12, 2012 8:27 PM

I was surprised actually that it took this long for someone to think of this, given the fact that the AIDS crisis in Africa is practically a pandemic.However it is a good idea that someone had finally started to do something about it.  

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, November 13, 2014 5:37 PM

This video explains the errors that a lot of NGOs make when attempting to help the developing world. While the NGOs have done a service providing condoms in the DRC, they lack appropriate marketing and merchandising for the product itself. In a way, the organizations need to eliminate their egos in the situation and allow for the product to be marketed appropriately.

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AIDS/HIV Video: Development and Disease

Justine Ojambo, co-founder of the SLF-funded project PEFO in Uganda, talks about losing his mother to AIDS and PEFO's work to support children orphaned by AI...

 

THis is a great video on AIDS/HIV in Africa.  So many show Africans as passive victims of global and environmental forces beyond their control, this one is of empowered and inspiring people seeking to change the world.  For more inspiration AIDS/HIVS videos from Africa, see: http://stephenlewisfoundation.org/news-resources/multimedia/video-clips


Via Seth Dixon
Crissy Borton's insight:

One thing that stuck out to me in this video is when he spoke about the making sure the children’s basic needs are met so they can concentrate on school. That is such a problem in our education system today that people don’t wish to address. I wonder how our education system would be if we made sure our children also had their basic needs met.

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Peter Siner's comment, November 16, 2011 10:08 PM
it seems as though there is little we can do to help help end this horrible plague in africa besides donate money or food , relgion is such a huge factor in their decision making process
Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 16, 2014 8:11 AM

Ojambo has founded a project that addresses the extremely sad issue of orphans who have lost their parents to AIDS. These children need help because they do not have parents to support them, leaving them with their Grandparents who struggle to support these children. This video made me think of AIDS in Africa in a different way. When I thought of AIDS in Africa, I always focused on how many people were dying and how tragic that was. I seldom thought of the people they were leaving behind and what their death would mean to those still living.