Education in San Francisco
39 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Audrey M
Scoop.it!

Does Eating a Good School Lunch Make You Smarter? - US News

Does Eating a Good School Lunch Make You Smarter? - US News | Education in San Francisco | Scoop.it
Arthur Agatston, of South Beach diet fame, thinks good school nutrition programs raise math scores.
Audrey M's insight:

"Improved" Ideas

 

Arther Agatston says that by "improving the nutritional quality of schools meals bolsters the academic performance of students." The rest of the article sets out to explain why. Talking about sugar intake in school lunches and concentration. But also the significant increase in math schools over the whole group of elementary students. It's a program that targets families that qualify for free or reduced lunches.

 

Mr. Agatston was not surprised by the results, he believes this issue to be a no brainer, however his next response truly shocked me: "many kids--while overfed--are literally malnourished." There is no diet involved with this study, no "solution to obesity," just a growth in the health code. His solution to the problem, or at least a more helpful solution is less fast food, and less fried food.

 

 

The first thorn I can across was that Mr. Agatston seemed to hold no regard for the amount of money that was necessary for the food he was saying people should eat in their homes. Brown rice and sweet potatoes do cost more than white rice, and french fries. He goes on to say that "[they're] quite convinced that as more schools ask for good food, that food shouldn't cost significantly more" I believe that this is a horrible thought. To me this type of thinking is a thorn because food will only grow in cost, not decrease as the demand increases.

 

A golden point however for me is that there are studies being done to convince governments and other organizations that it is worth the cost to have healthy food. Sometimes people can argue with numbers, but other times they cannot.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Audrey M
Scoop.it!

Daylight Foods and SFUSD - YouTube

Daylight Foods' Fresh Cuts is a custom cut produce service which prepares fresh fruits and vegetables to order. We are happy to be working with ISA of the Sa...
Audrey M's insight:

Weekly Blends

 

The company Daylight Foods makes fresh food every day for different organizations. They are making a  custom cabbage blend for SF schools that follows the nutritional guidelines of the district. This "cabbage mix" has a large variety of different vegetables which has distinctive colors, crispiness, taste. It improves the flavor and the students do like the blend. It is an in house production that delivers on the weekly basis and because it is being delivered weekly it extends the lives of the vegetables.

 

My biggest issue with this system is that the food just sits for a week in a huge freezer, and that can downgrade the nutritional value of the food. However the district did say that the food meets the requirements set by the city.

 

On the other hand, I really like that schools are getting fresh food on a weekly basis. Five years ago, this system was just kicking off and it was very rare o have fresh food, and now that there is a company who specifically caters to large companies or organizations is a huge step forward.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Audrey M
Scoop.it!

Log In

Audrey M's insight:

Creative Food

 

In 107 schools the SFUSD is servng two types of breakfast; the "Grab-n-Go" method which is a simple breakfast that the students can grab and eat anywhere they want and the traditional breakfast served 30 minutes before school. One Superintendent Richard A. Carranza said "It is vital that schools provide breakfast for students who would otherwise go without the most important meal of the day." In the future the SFUSD wants to expand this program to more elementary schools in San Francisco.

 

 

A few golden points, that I did like from this article, were that it started in an elementary school. I like this because by starting with the youngest kids, those kids can grow up to eat healthier or actually just eat. Another gold point was that there were 5600 breakfasts served a day at 107 schools.

 

But at the same time the timing of the breakfasts, what if people cannot get to school 30 minutes early? And another thing is do people have to pay for these breakfasts.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Audrey M
Scoop.it!

Finding time for healthy kid lunches

Finding time for healthy kid lunches | Education in San Francisco | Scoop.it
Editor's note: all week, CNN Newsroom, Rick's List and Eatocracy are teaming up to take a look the effects our dining choices have on our minds, bodies and wallets. Tune into CNN Newsroom daily from 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. ET for on-air coverage and join in the discussion here on Eatocracy.
Audrey M's insight:

The Simplicity Yet Complication of Food

 

This article is a list of tips for preparing healthy lunches for parents. It goes on to say that the lunches need to be simple and small, but also a variety.

 

I don't really understand how this article plans to help schools with healthy lunches, or provide the solution, but the comments certainly sparked. The main issue that people had with each other, not even the article (from what i read) was peanut butter or more specifically the ban on peanut butter. One commentator said that schools should not limit the types of food, while a few other rebutted that peanut allergies or any allergies in general are serious business.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Audrey M
Scoop.it!

SF teachers want hefty raise

SF teachers want hefty raise | Education in San Francisco | Scoop.it
San Francisco teachers want a raise, a big one.

The teachers union fired off the first volley in what is shaping up to be contentious contract talks, asking for a 21 percent pay raise over three years.

The union, the United Educators of San Francisco, say teachers can't afford to stay in
Audrey M's insight:

The Prospect of Payment

 

Teachers in San Francisco, who have been living here for years are being forced out; the solution? A 21% pay raise for all teachers over the next three years. The Union Educators proposed this pay raise stating that teachers are leaving the city to find higher pay in other cities, but "the district counter that the number of teachers leaving hasn't increase in recent years." The article finishes by stating that San Francisco has the lowest average salary for a teacher in the Bay Area (90,291 vs. 93,374).

 

Many of the comments are split between accepting the pay raise, as long as it is not a new tax, or are against it 100% because they do not believe that the argument is strong enough. A few of the strings were about how the raise should only be for the public school teachers who live in San Francisco, everyone else doesn't get a raise, but that was shut down due to the unfairness of that situation.

 

My favorite comment is one person simply commented on the fact that a teacher works 183 days and earn 58,291 dollars, they wanted that pay. The responses were vey negative and demeaning. I think that comments like these have no place in an article like this. But I do see some truth in certain comments, how the wording of the article leaves who actually gets the raise to the imagination.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Audrey M
Scoop.it!

If You Wonder How Broken Our Education System Is, Have I Got a Solution for You.

If You Wonder How Broken Our Education System Is, Have I Got a Solution for You. | Education in San Francisco | Scoop.it
It’s more than just textbooks and tablets.
Audrey M's insight:

The Technological Intervention

 

This article tells the public of the weaknesses and supposed benefits of bringing tablets to public schools nationwide. It also compares the project to the laptop wave that happened in the early 2000s. Saying that the students who did their homework on laptops improved their writing scores and math.

 

I like that the reason for the test scores rising due to to adding the tablets is that the teaching style must change when elements like the tablet are added. This attributes the change to the teachers and the school, rather than just the technology. Also the increase in technology means that schools need to hire a "tech staff" and this might cut into other staffs, or required a increase in the grade.

 

 

Disclaiming that schools should limit the tablet to school by saying that students need the responsibility of taking care of the technology. Another thorn in that the computers are attributed with the increase in the standardized tests, which can be attributed to wealth, time and commitment.

 

Questions that are raised are:

•What will happen to schools that don't follow this trend of technology in the classroom?

•What other options are there to improve schools?

•How much trust will the schools give to the students?

•Will textbooks become a thing of the past?

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Audrey M from Best Education Infographics
Scoop.it!

The Significance Of Creativity In Public Schools Infographic

The Significance Of Creativity In Public Schools Infographic | Education in San Francisco | Scoop.it

The Significance Of Creativity In Public Schools Infographic examines why art education is important in public schools and how arts education benefits students in several other areas. http://elearninginfographics.com/the-significance-of-creativity-in-public-schools-infographic/


Via elearninginfographic
Audrey M's insight:

Losing Imagination!

 

One of the more lucrative businesses in the world is art and the exportation, the USA will lose about 64 billion if we stop all creative process. Art gives the brain a break and the countries that require art as a  core class are also ranked with in the top scores of math and science consistently. Also the students that participate in the arts are known to excel in the standardized tests, have a positive attitude, and also stay in school longer.

 

The issue with this article is that it never talks about the negatives of the arts, how the arts can lower enthusiasm because students are forced to take them, and thus develop a hatred or loathing for the arts. Also there is no mention of the expense that schools must pay for the art departments to continue.

 

Questions:
how much money do schools spend on art?

should the schools be spending that money on something else (another program)? 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Audrey M
Scoop.it!

Tomatoes and Romanie and Carrots - Oh My - YouTube

Tomatoes and Romanie and Carrots - Oh My Food for Thought at SFUSD's salad bars
Audrey M's insight:

Veggies for All!

 

Kids don't want to eat vegetables, that was the first thing I heard from this video, but now the kids in SF happily eat the veggies provided by the mayors office. The first salad bar was implemented in Balboa High School

In 2008 the studies showed that 1/2 of the kids ate less than 1/2 of the recommended 5 servings of veggies a day of fruits and veggies and that when you discounted fried potatoes as veggies, 80% of HS students fail to even hit the 1/2 mark.One school's principal described that the location of schools/families do not help the eating of vegetables, and that kids learn the rules about eating healthy at school, then they bring it home to their homes and hopefully this will influence their parents in some way. One student said that typically students didn't eat lunch before the salad bar came to Balboa, and that is was a "good improvement"Another saids that "a lot of people just eats salads" and that "students don't get food like this at home" One of the last comments by the students was that "test scores have gone up from eating healthy"

 

 

A thorn that  I had while watching this video was that no boys were asked, only one 10th grader, and three 12th graders, all girls (three different ethnicities). And they didn't ask the kindergartners if they liked the food, just showed them answering with a thumbs up.

 

A golden point is that he general consensus was that there seemed to be a positive effect to having the salad bars. The test scores have had a positive increase and kids are actually eating lunch at school.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Audrey M
Scoop.it!

SFUSD: Meal Prices & Payment

SFUSD: Meal Prices & Payment | Education in San Francisco | Scoop.it
Pay online at www.MealpayPlus.com. View your child’s purchase history. If your child pays full price for breakfast and lunch meals (Paid eligibility), you have the option to pay for meals one day at a time or to purchase several meals ahead of time.
Audrey M's insight:

Who Qualifies?

 

Free or reduced lunches are based on the level of income that a family has in the home. These families include families who receive on food stamps, California Work Opportunity (CalWORKS) and Responsibility to kids assistance units (KinGAP) or benefit from the Food Distribution Program on Indian Reservations (FDPIR). The application for these programs are online. These forms are available in English, Chinese and Spanish.

 

 

The fact that the forms are online, also sets a standard that must be met. The question is how do families without computers fill out these forms? This thorn and then one about the languages hits me a little harder then anything else on this site.

 

The only rose for me, and this is only beacuse this is a fact site, is that there is this program. Schools and Districts have come a long way to even have this program in schools.

 

Questions that come up for me:

how many families are on this plan?

how old is this plan?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Audrey M
Scoop.it!

SFUSD: Meal Prices & Payment

SFUSD: Meal Prices & Payment | Education in San Francisco | Scoop.it
Pay online at www.MealpayPlus.com. View your child’s purchase history. If your child pays full price for breakfast and lunch meals (Paid eligibility), you have the option to pay for meals one day at a time or to purchase several meals ahead of time.
Audrey M's insight:

Who Qualifies?

 

Free or reduced lunches are based on the level of income that a family has in the home. These families include families who receive on food stamps, California Work Opportunity (CalWORKS) and Responsibility to kids assistance units (KinGAP) or benefit from the Food Distribution Program on Indian Reservations (FDPIR). The application for these programs are online. These forms are available in English, Chinese and Spanish.

 

 

The fact that the forms are online, also sets a standard that must be met. The question is how do families without computers fill out these forms? This thorn and then one about the languages hits me a little harder then anything else on this site.

 

The only rose for me, and this is only beacuse this is a fact site, is that there is this program. Schools and Districts have come a long way to even have this program in schools.

 

Questions that come up for me:

how many families are on this plan?

how old is this plan?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Audrey M
Scoop.it!

Schools struggle to feed kids healthy food - CNN.com

Schools struggle to feed kids healthy food - CNN.com | Education in San Francisco | Scoop.it
Dana Woldow issues a challenge to every member of Congress: "Try school cafeteria food in your district. Then see if you continue to make the same decisions about how you fund the program."
Audrey M's insight:

The Cost of Food:

 

Woldow (the main instigator) said that "People weren't ready for the changes" that they didn't wan to replaced potato chips with fresh vegetables and fruit because the cost of supplying those items were out of the budget. It costs a lot more money than the school has to fund this type of eating. The federal gov't reimburses schools if they feed healthy food but only about $2.74 per kid, not the $3.50 that is needed. Any dollar used for the food is a dollar out of the classroom. And in 2009, 94% of lunches didn't meet food regulation for this specific district, and probably many others too. In 2008 Obama wanted 10 million dollars for funding for school lunches across the country, however Congress offered a 6 cent increase per kid instead totally about half of what Obama wanted (about 4.5billion). To help with the food issue the USDA offered reduced lunches for the low income students. The quality of this food however lacks a lot.

 

"Schools shouldn't have to choose between meeting their children's academic needs and meeting their nutritional needs. We need a higher reimbursement -- 6 cents isn't going to do it." -- Woldow

 

The comments surprised me, a lot of people were behind the purchase of healthy food, while others were annoyed that people couldn't see that healthy lunches were in fact "less costly." THis comment was annoying due to the fact that the comment was based upon a single person, not a whole school that feeds around 200 people a day. People were also shocked by some comments calling for the removal or just plain ignoring of the school problems just because they pack their kids lunch. These comments gave a me a little hope (the responses to comments like the one above) these people will hopefully spearhead a change in the lunch program. Feed your kids like you feed other peoples.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Audrey M
Scoop.it!

San Francisco parents raise private funds to support public school

San Francisco parents raise private funds to support public school | Education in San Francisco | Scoop.it
Steve Sacks is the PTA President at Alvarado Elementary School in Noe Valley. He takes a lot of pride in this small school and the education it provides
Audrey M's insight:

Parents Picking Up The Slack

 

PTA = parent teacher association

 

Starting with the improvements that the parent donations have made over the years, the article then goes on to say that the whole program is geared towards community building and only a small portion is focused on money. At the end of the story Sack says that "the year 2008 was also a key turning point for them." Going on to say that the when the buget was cut drastically the parents rallied.

 

The first and only comment asks why this situation is legal. I read on, wondering why they would ask that, but the comment stated that by law if a school does not have the required programs the parents can sue. They ask how anyone can consider this "free public education."

 

I think that it's comments like this that make people antsy. Also, maybe there is a bit of truth to the comment, like yes people can sue if the school does not have a core class that is needed, but I think that this story is more about how the parents are working together to improve a horrible situation (like the market crashing)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Audrey M
Scoop.it!

How budget cuts and PTA fundraising undermined equity in San Francisco public schools | EdSource Today

How budget cuts and PTA fundraising undermined equity in San Francisco public schools | EdSource Today | Education in San Francisco | Scoop.it
Audrey M's insight:

Equity Cuts

 

Shrinking public funds leads to multiple budget cuts in many schools city wide. However there is a silver linking: concerned parents have helped since 2007 and have "quadrupled their spending on schools." While some schools did dodge the budge bullet, many did not. But in recent years the government has created new policies to help replace drained revenue.

 

 

"The layoffs hurt morale more than other cuts because it’s people." -- Cheung

 

Many of the comments were to clear up confusion on one point or another made by the article (Mr. Smith), and one such person was outspoken about how the article was wrong about the budget cuts, while other supported the ideas presented. There began a "discussion" where "Don" and "Paul" contradicted each other.

 

I cannot say for sure if this article is completely correct, however I can state that the article brought out emotions and thoughts. Mr. Smith complete compelled me to compare it to my situation as being from private school, and I find that it might depict a more accurate picture than many people would like to think. However my only real complaint, was there was no solution presented, maybe that's the point: we don't have a solution.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Audrey M
Scoop.it!

SFUSD schools begin new computer-based testing

SFUSD schools begin new computer-based testing | Education in San Francisco | Scoop.it
Students in the San Francisco Unified School District began taking online computer-based assessments this week in replacement of the state’s old STAR testing program. The...
Audrey M's insight:

The new STAR test

 

This article is about the new standardized tests that the San Francisco public school education systems are using to determine readiness of its students. The new testing will use a new computer testing program where the students will continue with the classic topics while also "testing the test".

 

This test is still in its early stages, meaning that people have no idea what to expect. It is a test for only public school, which lends to the idea that there is a difference in the education level of private vs. public schools. Also implying that the ERBs and STAR tests are outdated and no longer useful.

 

Questions to research further:

1. why is there two different standardized tests?

2. how are people responding to the new tests? (this will be interesting to see in the future)

3. why is it so important that it is a computer based program test?

more...
No comment yet.