Education in a Multicultural Society
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The Crazy College of
Qatar

The Crazy College of<br/>Qatar | Education in a Multicultural Society | Scoop.it
According to the American Association of Community Colleges, the portion of all junior college revenues provided by the states has plunged by 16 percent since 2008. Students have been forced to make up most of the difference, through higher tuition. “There’s been a divestment in higher education, and in particular community colleges,” says Martha Parham, the AACC’s senior vice president of public relations. “We can barely afford to do our core classes, so colleges need to find other sources of revenue.”

But educators hoping to strike it rich abroad would do well to heed the lesson of Houston Community College. In 2010, HCC signed a five-year, $45 million deal with Qatar to set up the Gulf monarchy’s first American-style junior college, the Community College of Qatar. Under the agreement, HCC sent dozens of professors and administrators to Doha to teach English-language courses to CCQ’s students, who could then transfer to a four-year college in Qatar or abroad. For its part, HCC looked forward to a financial windfall: With Qatar footing all the bills, plus a 10 percent management fee, it stood to make $4.5 million in profit.

Via Jim Lerman
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Introducing ISIS

"The invasion of Iraq was supposed to turn the country into a democracy that posed no threat to the United States, or the rest of the world. Thirteen years later, Iraq has collapsed into three warring states. A third of the country is controlled by ISIS, who have also taken huge amounts of territory in Syria. VICE correspondent Ben Anderson gains exclusive access to the three front lines in Iraq, where Sunni, Shiite and Kurdish forces are fighting for their lives. Anderson visits with the Russian military forces in Syria, meets captured ISIS fighters in Kurdistan, and interviews US policymakers about how the situation in Iraq spun out of control."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 13, 2:15 PM

Many young students are especially baffled at how a terrorist organization can seize control of large chunks of territory.  If you are looking for a good video introduction that explains how and why ISIS was able to gain power and than gain and maintain territory, this is it (it's classroom safe despite the source). 

 

Tags: Syria, war, conflict, political, geopolitics, Iraq, devolution, terrorism, ISISMiddle East.

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Human Rights: The Right to Freedom of Expression

Human Rights: The Right to Freedom of Expression | Education in a Multicultural Society | Scoop.it
Take action for human rights. Learn to defend human rights by understanding the right to freedom of expression.
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How People Around the World Spot American Tourists

How People Around the World Spot American Tourists | Education in a Multicultural Society | Scoop.it
We asked people from around the globe to share the easiest and most blatant ways to spot an American tourist in their home countries.
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MOOCs as tools for equity in under-resourced high schools

MOOCs as tools for equity in under-resourced high schools | Education in a Multicultural Society | Scoop.it
News, voices and jobs for education professionals. Optimized for your mobile phone.
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How to Teach Culture In Your Classroom

How to Teach Culture In Your Classroom | Education in a Multicultural Society | Scoop.it
It has been said that culture is like an iceberg, that only ten percent of it is visible and the other ninety percent is hidden below the surface. For this reason, ESL teachers must make intentional efforts to teach cultural understanding and tolerance to their students.

Via Nik Peachey
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Nik Peachey's curator insight, August 7, 12:26 AM

Some useful tips and materials.

Tiina Sarisalmi's curator insight, August 8, 12:45 AM
Käytännön vinkkejä, jotka me kaikki jo toki tiedämme. Voidaan käyttää lähes missä tahansa oppiaineessa tai monialaisessa oppimiskokonaisuudessa.
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Center for Global Peace Journalism | Park University

Center for Global Peace Journalism | Park University | Education in a Multicultural Society | Scoop.it
Welcome to the Center for Global Peace Journalism at Park University. Learn about peace journalism, explore current projects and read the Peace Journalist Magazine.
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Teaching Young Children About Bias, Diversity, and Social Justice

Teaching Young Children About Bias, Diversity, and Social Justice | Education in a Multicultural Society | Scoop.it
Use young children's understanding of differences to teach social justice through age-appropriate literature, news stories, anti-bias lessons, familiar examples, and problem solving.

Via Bonnie Bracey Sutton
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How the Push for Superiority is Killing Our Kids

How the Push for Superiority is Killing Our Kids | Education in a Multicultural Society | Scoop.it

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Lon Woodbury's curator insight, June 20, 10:15 AM

One more facet of why the field of therapeutic boarding schools, wilderness therapy and RTCs has consistently been growing.  How about letting children be children? -Lon

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We're All Biased, but That Doesn't Keep Us from Making Valid Decisions

We're All Biased, but That Doesn't Keep Us from Making Valid Decisions | Education in a Multicultural Society | Scoop.it
We can often believe conclusions we reach even when we know that we arrived at them in a biased way

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History in Motion

History in Motion | Education in a Multicultural Society | Scoop.it
History in Motion makes it easy to create, share, and explore animated
historical maps and scenarios.

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When Two Worlds Don’t Collide: Can Social Curation Address the Marginalisation of Open Educational Practices and Resources from Outside Academia? | Journal of Interactive Media in Education

When Two Worlds Don’t Collide: Can Social Curation Address the Marginalisation of Open Educational Practices and Resources from Outside Academia? | Journal of Interactive Media in Education | Education in a Multicultural Society | Scoop.it
Abstract

A canyonesque gulf has long existed between open academia and many external subject communities. Since 2011, we have been developing and piloting the public open scholar role (Coughlan and Perryman 2012) - involving open academics discovering, sharing and discussing open educational resources (OER) with online communities outside formal education in order to help bridge this gulf. In 2013 we took the public open scholar into Facebook (Perryman and Coughlan, 2013) to reach an international audience of autism-focussed Facebook groups in India, Africa and Malaysia, with a combined membership of over 5000 people.

Performing the public open scholar role within Facebook led to our learning from group members about new resources produced by subject communities outside formal education, for example by voluntary sector organisations, government and professional bodies. These resources are surprisingly numerous and compare favourably with those from universities. Seeking to source more such resources we conducted a systematic large-scale search of free online courses, recording not only the number of learning materials available, but also how easy it was to find them.

We found that provision from formal education, especially universities, dominates the returned results when searching for free online courses. Consequently, resources from beyond formal education, while they exist, are difficult to find. Indeed, most aggregators and repositories proudly state that the free online courses they list are from 'Top Universities', appearing oblivious to provision from external subject communities. We extended our research to cover e-textbooks and found a similar situation, with content from formal education again dominating provision.

On the basis of these findings we suggest that the prominence of university-provided content within search aggregators not only marginalises externally produced resources, relegating them to even more obscurity than has been the case thus far, but also marginalises the open educational practices that were involved in the production of these resources. We propose that the OER movement’s questions about ways of involving end-users as co-producers may be answered by looking to external subject communities and, accordingly, we should be supporting and learning from these communities. In addition, there is a need for further research into the open educational practices of external subject communities, who are clearly more than just passive consumers of resources and are involved in both producing and adapting OER.

Our research has also led to our further developing the public open scholar role to include online content curation as a part of the process, on the basis of evidence indicating that online curation has the potential to help increase the discoverability of resources and raise awareness of open educational practices from beyond academia. In particular, we suggest that ‘social curation’ (Seitzinger, 2014) - which foregrounds sharing curated collections as a component of the curation process - has a key role in this regard. We also suggest that further research in this area could be beneficial, for example in exploring the potential for librarians to become involved in curating OER from outside academia.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.5334/jime.ab

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Why China and India face a marriage crisis

"What has lead to this marriage squeeze?  First, millions women have gone 'missing'. A generation ago, a preference for sons and the greater availability of prenatal screening meant first Chinese couples, then Indian ones, started aborting female fetuses and only giving birth to boys. At its extreme, in parts of Asia, more than 120 boys were being born for every 100 girls. Now, the generation with distorted sex ratios at birth is reaching marriageable age. The result is that single men far outnumber women."

 

Tags: gender, China, India, culture, population.


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Dustin Fowler's curator insight, September 17, 7:23 PM
Great food for thought!
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Best Campus Food | The Princeton Review

Best Campus Food | The Princeton Review | Education in a Multicultural Society | Scoop.it
Check out our ranking list of colleges with the best food, based on ratings and quotes from real students about cafeterias, gluten-free options, and more.
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Helping decide where to attend college
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Colin Kaepernick explains why he sat during national anthem

Colin Kaepernick explains why he sat during national anthem | Education in a Multicultural Society | Scoop.it
The 49ers quarterback refused to stand for the national anthem Friday, saying, "I am not going to stand up to show pride in a flag for a country that oppresses black people and people of color."
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WGBH American Experience | PBS

WGBH American Experience | PBS | Education in a Multicultural Society | Scoop.it

The Boys of '36 premieres August 2, 2016 on PBS American Experience. The story of nine working-class young men from the University of Washington who took the rowing world and the nation by storm when they captured the gold medal at the 1936 Olympic Games in Berlin. Their unexpected victory -- against not only the Ivy League teams of the East Coast but Adolf Hitler's elite German rowers -- gave hope to a nation struggling to emerge from the depths of the Depression. 

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Ryan Lochte is everything the world hates about Americans

Ryan Lochte is everything the world hates about Americans | Education in a Multicultural Society | Scoop.it
This was late one night -- actually, early one morning -- in the summer of 2004, at a bustling tavern in Plaka, the social heart of Athens during the Olympics. We could see the Parthenon from our table, where six of us, from six different countries, had just wound up another 16-hour day covering boating, boxing and badminton, convincing our readers in five different languages that we were experts in all of them.

It was the reporter from Naftemporiki, a financial newspaper based in Greece, who said, joking, "I think we all know who wrote the best story today," and he pointed at me.

I was enjoying both my Heineken and the international compliment when the reporter from The Australian newspaper explained the joke to me, which had gone sailing over my head.

"Of course you did, mate," he said. "You wrote it in American!"

This was my colleagues' subtle explanation for what we commonly refer to as the "Ugly American" abroad: a sense of entitlement, however subtle; a feeling of superiority, however unintended. My Aussie friend added, "You aren't really all that ugly. Just slightly disfigured."

Sometimes, as I've traveled overseas, I've been troubled by that notion, of the assumption of the Ugly American. I've thought it a cartoon, a caricature, whose time was surely over.

And then, sometimes, you see someone like Ryan Lochte open his mouth.

And when you hear what comes tumbling out, it all makes perfect sense.

That's the worst part of what Lochte and his stable of stumble-bumbling swimmer pals have done the past few days, now that it's apparent that whatever might have happened to them late one night -- actually, early one morning -- in Rio, it wasn't exactly the way Lochte described it the first time around. In fact, it seems apparent that Lochte and his cohorts in chaos -- Jack Conger, Gunnar Bentz and Jimmy Feigen, all swimmers representing the US in a decidedly different way than Katie Ledecky and Michael Phelps did -- were using the old "robbed-at-gunpoint" chestnut as cover for what was apparently a gas station encounter with a security guard and, quite hilariously, a bathroom door.



Maybe panicky athletes from Kazakhstan or Kenya or Kuala Lampur might have reacted similarly and seized on the easy (though rooted-in-reality) narrative presented for months, that Rio was a cross between the Wild West of yore and the Fort Apache Bronx of the 1970s. Maybe it would have occurred to a rower from Rwanda or a decathlete from Denmark or a sprinter from Spain to go that way. Maybe. But that's not who did this.

Ryan Lochte -- Ugly American with a truly ugly hairstyle -- did it.

So we have him, and his kind, to thank for the suspicious stares we get on the streets of Prague, or the rolled eyes we get standing in line for gelato in Florence, or the curious questions we get from cab drivers in County Clare.

It hasn't been easy being Lochte, who has had to spend his athletic prime competing in Phelps' considerable shadow, who always has been The Other Guy, who always has had to resort to his inherent goofiness to stand out because even his impressive haul of 12 Olympic medals -- six of them gold, including one in the 4x200 freestyle relay last week -- looks like a pauper's pile next to Phelps'. But it hasn't exactly been hard; he's dabbled in show business and reality TV, he dates a Playboy model, he's made millions outside of the pool.

And if what the authorities say happened actually happened: a brawl with a rent-a-cop, a busted door, a little drunk-and-disorderly -- did he really think that was going to hurt his reputation? That's Whitey Bulger fretting over a jaywalking ticket. It's ridiculous.

No, instead he cried wolf and was called on it, and that will be his burden to bear for a good long while -- but not his alone. The Ugly American is alive and well in 2016 thanks to this dope. Thanks for that, Ryan. Now don't let the bathroom door hit you on the ass on your way to Palookaville.

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Bangladesh's Hazardous Geography

Bangladesh's Hazardous Geography | Education in a Multicultural Society | Scoop.it
Bangladesh is exposed to threat of hazards resulting from a number of natural disasters and remains classified as one the most vulnerable countries. Majority of the country is affected by cyclone, drought and floods.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 16, 4:53 PM

Bangladesh is regularly hit with different types of natural disasters. The impact of these natural disasters costs the country millions making it dependent on foreign aid.  Disaster clean-up and relief aid after major floods, droughts, and hurricanes.  

 

Tagsdisasters, environmentBangladeshSouth Asia, development.

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TANZANIA « Interactions of Malnutrition and Enteric Infections: Consequences for Child Health and Development

TANZANIA « Interactions of Malnutrition and Enteric Infections: Consequences for Child Health and Development | Education in a Multicultural Society | Scoop.it
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How Social Media Can Impact Corporate Culture

How Social Media Can Impact Corporate Culture | Education in a Multicultural Society | Scoop.it
#SocialMedia, 5 articles around company culture, #engagement, #essentials, #visual & tools https://t.co/Q2aiPLb6Vb https://t.co/afX3ED7Xfm
Via Rami Kantari, John van den Brink, malek, Anna
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Competitive Parenting: I Blame The Bumper Stickers…

Competitive Parenting: I Blame The Bumper Stickers… | Education in a Multicultural Society | Scoop.it
What impact does PR about children's accomplishments have on their sense of self and level of pressure?

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Lon Woodbury's curator insight, June 17, 2:59 PM

Great essay!  A parent's focus should be on the well being of their children, not on some public relations image. -Lon

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DISC: the different communication styles

DISC: the different communication styles | Education in a Multicultural Society | Scoop.it
&nbsp;
Why it is important to understand the various communication styles.
&nbsp;
In business it is essential to build rapport with people that we want to work with. Regardless of whether it is in

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Why Isn’t Native American Food Hip?

Why Isn’t Native American Food Hip? | Education in a Multicultural Society | Scoop.it
American-Indian cooking has all the makings of a culinary trend, but it’s been limited by many diners’ unfamiliarity with its dishes and its loaded history.
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Poles of Inaccessibility

Poles of Inaccessibility | Education in a Multicultural Society | Scoop.it
Geography nuts have located the hardest place to get to on every continent and beyond.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 20, 9:59 AM

The middle of nowhere...this is a common expression that is used to convey isolation, backwardness, wilderness, or a lack of network connections.  This article focuses on 8 places that are the farthest away from coasts as well as land (known as 'Poles of Inaccessibility').  The point on the map above is Point Nemo, right in the middle of the South Pacific Ocean; it is the farthest place on Earth from land and is one of the best candidates for the world champion title of "the middle of nowehere."  What is it close to?  Nothing. 

 

Tagsplace, distance, site, Oceania.