Education for Teachers
103 views | +1 today
Follow
 
Rescooped by Sydney Rardin from Eclectic Technology
onto Education for Teachers
Scoop.it!

There’s No Homework in Finland | Online Classes

There’s No Homework in Finland | Online Classes | Education for Teachers | Scoop.it

Via Beth Dichter
Sydney Rardin's insight:

If you take a minute to read this article, it's very interesting to read how Finland has rised to the top.

more...
Beth Dichter's curator insight, March 9, 2013 7:57 PM
Schools in Finland have been in the news quite a bit lately. Why? To quote from the post "one of Finland’s greatest accomplishments to date—its high-achieving education system. Students in Finland have, over the past several years, risen to the top of the academic food-chain, and they’ve become some of the top scholarly performers in the world." This infographic is interesting in that it gives some comparisons of schools in Finland compared to schools in the US (and Canada). For more information click through to the infographic
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Sydney Rardin from Eclectic Technology
Scoop.it!

Alternatives To Homework: A Chart For Teachers

Alternatives To Homework: A Chart For Teachers | Education for Teachers | Scoop.it

Via Beth Dichter
more...
Beth Dichter's curator insight, June 17, 2013 10:50 PM

What if instead of giving homework to our students we asked them to come up with ideas? This chart provides a variety of alternative ways to look at homework. The post describes this as "Rather than simply a list of alternatives to homework, it instead contextualizes the need for work at home (or, “homework”). It does this by taking typical classroom situations–the introduction of new material, demonstrating a procedure, etc.), and offering alternatives to traditional homework assignments."

Consider asking your students what they would suggest doing instead of homework. What might you be able to add to these suggestions?

 

Nancy Jones's curator insight, June 19, 2013 9:40 AM

Love this! 21st century learning isn't as much about technology as it is thinking .allowing choices and options like this not only allow students choices but the opportunity for deeper thinking.

Laura Jane's curator insight, December 16, 2013 12:17 AM

I stole this from Jamie, and couldn't agree more! What a great [and practical] resource to have as we go into the final semester of our internships. This chart is chock full of ideas for creating more authentic and less monotonous homework for students. It focuses on reinforcing, and not memorizing. 

 

These strategies could work for all grade levels, to different extents. This again addresses the quality vs quantity debate. One of my favorite examples is to reinforce a skill that has been taught. It suggests that, instead of asking students to solve 10 word probelms to prove that they know a skill, to have them work in groups to solve, model, and present one deeper thinking word probelm.

 

This allows students to work in harmony to formulate their ideas, and is a more productive approach to learning. Although some cognitive struggle is good, too much leads to frustration and defeat. Allowing students to work together helps them to actively participate in student-centered learning, and they can better understand what they've learned. I will definitely be printing this chart to put in my lesson planning binder.

Scooped by Sydney Rardin
Scoop.it!

Kentucky Standards | Common Core Standards | Common Core Activities, Worksheets, and Workbooks.

Kentucky Standards | Common Core Standards | Common Core Activities, Worksheets, and Workbooks. | Education for Teachers | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sydney Rardin
Scoop.it!

Public forums scheduled to talk about privatization of UK dining services | Education | Kentucky.com

Public forums scheduled to talk about privatization of UK dining services | Education | Kentucky.com | Education for Teachers | Scoop.it
The University of Kentucky will hold two public forums about the possible privatization of its dining services.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sydney Rardin
Scoop.it!

Georgia high school students unite to fight segregated prom

A group of Georgia high school seniors has come together to organize a racially integrated prom, which will be the first of its kind in Wilcox County, Ga.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sydney Rardin from Eclectic Technology
Scoop.it!

What's the Difference Between "Using Technology" and "Technology Integration"?

What's the Difference Between "Using Technology" and "Technology Integration"? | Education for Teachers | Scoop.it
Recently, I've been noticing that a lot of instructors are under the impression that they are successfully integrating technology, when in fact they are simply using technology. Although this might...

Via Beth Dichter
more...
Rebecca Ferlazzo's curator insight, May 12, 2013 9:27 PM

An important point to remember when we are considering using technology in the classroom. The integration of technology can be a help in the classroom while simply using technology can become a hinderance. So where do we make that distinction? 

James Buchanan's curator insight, June 5, 2013 11:47 PM

This article is about digital technology and how it is used and integrated. Are we truly USING technology when it is not integrated? When we ask for assessment that is presented with powerpoint, for example, we could just as easily ask them to write it in a book or make a poster. Digital technology should be used to facilitate collaboration and build high level thinking skills, that is how learning occurs.

 

Rebecca Wilkins's curator insight, July 17, 2015 9:18 PM

Technology use is the first step.  Technology integration is the opportunity to combine technology with pedagogy.  Technology infusion is the process of using technology as a tool for learning, thinking, and problem solving.

Scooped by Sydney Rardin
Scoop.it!

One Moms Challenge: Raising a Teen With Type 1 Diabetes - Type 1 Diabetes Center - EverydayHealth.com

One Moms Challenge: Raising a Teen With Type 1 Diabetes - Type 1 Diabetes Center - EverydayHealth.com | Education for Teachers | Scoop.it
A dedicated mom shares the emotional challenges and frustrations of parenting a teen with type 1 diabetes -- and where she eventually found support.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sydney Rardin from Eclectic Technology
Scoop.it!

Free apps list for Education by Grade Levels

A list of free apps recommended by the STaRT Education Department

Via Beth Dichter
more...
Beth Dichter's curator insight, March 18, 2013 10:22 PM

If you are looking for free apps that are divided by grade level and rated by a school district this post may be helpful. Apps are split into K-2, 3-5, 6-8, 9+, and teachers, and raged from 3 to 5. A great place to begin if you are going to getting iPads into your classroom.

hatem deif's curator insight, March 20, 2013 10:13 AM

with my best wishes/respectfully

Rescooped by Sydney Rardin from Eclectic Technology
Scoop.it!

Innovation Design In Education - ASIDE: Are Today's Students Afraid Of Intellectual Risk?

Innovation Design In Education - ASIDE: Are Today's Students Afraid Of Intellectual Risk? | Education for Teachers | Scoop.it

"An increasing refrain from various rungs of the educational ladder is that students are scared to take intellectual risks. Teachers note that pupils are reluctant to guess, to stretch themselves, or to experiment. Perhaps it's a consequence of the "praised" generation, when kids receive trophies for participation and adults shield adolescents from failure..."


Via Beth Dichter
more...
Beth Dichter's curator insight, March 26, 2013 10:36 PM

If students are unwilling to take intellectual risks what other risks might they be unwilling to make in the future? This post explore this issue from an educational, professional and personal viewpoint. The image above is a representation that explores "some of the issues we're wresting with in guiding our students. The different spectra on the "x" and "y" axes represent the different ways people respond to uncertainty and action."

Scooped by Sydney Rardin
Scoop.it!

Video - Armenia Makes Chess Mandatory in Schools

Video - Armenia Makes Chess Mandatory in Schools | Education for Teachers | Scoop.it
Video - In Armenia they’ve added chess to the list by law. Armenia is the first country to make chess a compulsory course for grade-school children.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sydney Rardin
Scoop.it!

How autism can cost families millions

How autism can cost families millions | Education for Teachers | Scoop.it
As the rate of reported cases rises, the expense of providing care -- sometimes for a lifetime -- is becoming staggering.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sydney Rardin
Scoop.it!

National Association of Special Education Teachers: Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

Emotional Disturbance Child Disturbance Emotional – National Association of Special Education Teachers
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sydney Rardin from Teaching students with special needs
Scoop.it!

Super Powers for the Blind and Deaf: Scientific American

Super Powers for the Blind and Deaf: Scientific American | Education for Teachers | Scoop.it
The brain rewires itself to boost the remaining senses...

Via Wildcat2030, Rhonda Blevins
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sydney Rardin from Eclectic Technology
Scoop.it!

Alternative Search Tools: These options to Google will help students become better researchers - The Digital Shift

Alternative Search Tools: These options to Google will help students become better researchers - The Digital Shift | Education for Teachers | Scoop.it

"Pose a research question to students and most of them will immediately turn to the Internet. Sadly, many students think the only option is Google...Here I’ll present some free options for research that don’t require a login, along with a few quick tips to aid student searches."


Via Beth Dichter
more...
Lucy Wareham's comment, April 9, 2013 12:13 AM
I have found that some students are also drawn to inappropriate adverts and links when researching. This search engine would avoid this distraction. Thanks
Kia Sowden's comment, May 11, 2013 12:48 AM
Hi Malena, Thanks for sharing this resource. I think it would be useful to remove the distraction that students so easily spend their time viewing. I think it would also comply with legislation when it comes to students use of the internet and appropriate sites.
Jenni Atkinson's comment, May 15, 2013 11:44 PM
Great find.It is so easy to get distracted or off track when searching on the net and I agree with James re: deeper searches.
Rescooped by Sydney Rardin from Eclectic Technology
Scoop.it!

Driving Question to Facilitate Student Inquiry and Common Core

Driving Question to Facilitate Student Inquiry and Common Core | Education for Teachers | Scoop.it

"I really like Driving Questions. In fact, I like them so much more then Essential Questions. You might ask why? I think it just might be my affection for the revised Bloom’s Taxonomy. You may remember that in the revision the different levels were changed into action."


Via Beth Dichter
more...
Beth Dichter's curator insight, June 18, 2013 10:04 PM

In this post Gorman explains why he likes driving questions and how they differ from essential questions. He states "they allow students to work together in the amazing process of divergent thinking." 

Gorman also notes that it is difficult to create good driving questions (and one might say the same can be true with essential questions). The image above looks at questions asked in "educationese" and how one might translate that to a driving question.

In addition he provides links to quite a few resources that include:

* A resource that looks at concepts of the driving question

* A variety of resources on Project Based Learning, including how to craft a driving question (which also includes a video)

* Practice with driving questions

Scooped by Sydney Rardin
Scoop.it!

St. Agatha Academy students argue case for Palestinian's water rights

St. Agatha Academy students argue case for Palestinian's water rights | Education for Teachers | Scoop.it
For some St. Agatha Academy students, a visit to a mock United Nations has turned into an opportunity to make a real difference to the world.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sydney Rardin
Scoop.it!

Study: Teens' interaction with peers may be indicator of adult success

A study says how well you do with peers as an early teen could be a good indication of how well you will perform as an adult.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sydney Rardin from Eclectic Technology
Scoop.it!

Nine Things Educators Need to Know About the Brain

Nine Things Educators Need to Know About the Brain | Education for Teachers | Scoop.it

"The human brain wasn’t designed for industrial education.

It was shaped over millions of years of sequential adaptation in response to ever-changing environmental demands. Over time, brains grew in size and complexity; old structures were conserved and new structures emerged. As we evolved into social beings, our brains became incredibly sensitive to our social worlds."


Via Beth Dichter
more...
Beth Dichter's curator insight, April 4, 2013 8:59 PM

How much do you know about your brain? This post will help you learn more about it and how understanding the brain will help you with your students. There is a short introduction and the a list of the main ideas is below. Additional information is available in the post as well as a visual image that links to the nine ideas. Links to additional materials are also available.

* The brain is a social organism.

* We have two brains.

* Early learning is powerful.

* Conscious awareness and unconscious processing occur at different speeds, often simultaneously.

* The mind, brain, and body are interwoven.

* The brain has a short attention span and needs repetition and multiple-channel processing for deeper learning to occur.

* Fear and stress impair learning.

* We analyze others but not ourselves: the primacy of projection.

* Learning is enhanced by emphasizing the big picture—and then allowing students to discover the details for themselves.

AAEEBL's curator insight, April 4, 2013 9:53 PM

Good stuff.

Rescooped by Sydney Rardin from Eclectic Technology
Scoop.it!

10 Ways to Use Technology to Teach Writing > Eye On Education

10 Ways to Use Technology to Teach Writing > Eye On Education | Education for Teachers | Scoop.it

"The Common Core’s Anchor Standard 6 for writing in grades K–12 requires students to “use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and to interact and collaborate with others”. Here are some ideas for meeting this standard (besides the obvious use of technology—word processing).


Via Beth Dichter
more...
Beth Dichter's curator insight, April 7, 2013 9:35 AM

What tools are there to help students PRODUCE writing online? Lauren Davis identifies five areas that for producing writing:

* Collaborative tools

* Grammar and language resources

* Fun prompts to get their juices flowing

* Brainstorming and drafting graphic organizers.

* Research tools

What tools are there to help students PUBLISH writing online?
* Magazines

* Online contests

* Class e-newsletter or newspaper

* Book review website

* Class blog or website

There are links to many resources thoughout this post and in many cases specific suggestions are provided for grade levels. If you are not using online tools with your students this post provides great resources to help you begin the process.

mshudson's curator insight, April 7, 2013 12:04 PM

Very interesting! I use some of the tools highlighted but must expand my application to include consistent student usage.

Lee Hall's curator insight, April 9, 2013 4:20 PM

So much more fun than just word processing.

Scooped by Sydney Rardin
Scoop.it!

Instructional Strategies for Students with Multiple Disabilities | Paths to Literacy

Instructional Strategies for Students with Multiple Disabilities | Paths to Literacy | Education for Teachers | Scoop.it
Strategies to help students who are blind or visually impaired with additional disabilities, including deafblindness to develop literacy skills
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sydney Rardin from Eclectic Technology
Scoop.it!

27 Actions That Promote Self-Directed Learning

27 Actions That Promote Self-Directed Learning | Education for Teachers | Scoop.it

"So I'm trying to better understand how people learn--not now they're taught in terms of teaching strategies, but more so learning strategies--only not really strategies...Learning actions, or cognitive actions."


Via Beth Dichter
more...
Beth Dichter's curator insight, March 19, 2013 10:04 PM

How can we help out students become more self-directed in their learning? What tools can we provide them with to help them become self-directed learners (using 21st century tools and skills)? 

This post provides a list of 27 actions. The post states:

"The big idea is that these kinds of “brain actions” are not only the kinds of tasks you can use to create assignments, but more importantly are the kinds of acts that promote inquiry-based understanding. So rather than start with a topic–fractions, metaphors, or racism–you can simply insist on the cognitive action itself. Learners can choose topics of their own, or you can offer a range of topics."

With that as a background five of the actions are listed below. There is additional material in the post as well as another 22 actions.

* Challenge something

* Test the validity of a model

* Study the relationship between text and subtext

* Critique something

* Transfer a lesson or philosophical stance from one situation to another

JoAnn Delaney's curator insight, August 6, 2013 12:08 PM

27 cognitive actions #edchat #21stedchat

Don Berg's curator insight, July 10, 2014 3:53 PM

Interesting how much of challenge it is to distinguish between teaching and learning. That is one of the obstacles to getting self-directed learning to become a mainstream feature in schools.

Scooped by Sydney Rardin
Scoop.it!

The War Over Math and Reading

The War Over Math and Reading | Education for Teachers | Scoop.it
I don't want to slow down the engine that is promoting improved access for girls and women in science and technology. But Stoet and Geary's data actually beg for answers about educating the low achievers.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sydney Rardin
Scoop.it!

Video - High School Creates Transgender Bathrooms

Video - High School Creates Transgender Bathrooms | Education for Teachers | Scoop.it
Video - Portland's largest public high school has reclassified six bathrooms as unisex to create another option for transgender students and faculty who feel uncomfortable with traditional bathrooms.
Sydney Rardin's insight:
Parents don't want their children to learn about sex education but will have boys and girls share the same bathroom. I don't see how someone feels uncomfortable in a traditional bathroom.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sydney Rardin from Teaching students with special needs
Scoop.it!

iPad Technology Helps Down Syndrome Student Communicate

iPad Technology Helps Down Syndrome Student Communicate | Education for Teachers | Scoop.it
iPad Technology Helps Down Syndrome Student CommunicateNewsChannel5.comIt's just expressing it that's the hard thing, and that's where the iPad comes in," said special education teacher Sarah Roberts.

Via kcalderw, McKenzie Mahring, Rhonda Blevins
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sydney Rardin from Eclectic Technology
Scoop.it!

Better Teaching: Why You Bore Students & What You Can Do About It

Better Teaching: Why You Bore Students & What You Can Do About It | Education for Teachers | Scoop.it

"You don’t mean to bore students. In fact, sometimes you’re downright interesting–the students are engaged, the buzz in the room is palpable, and even the hesitant students are asking questions. But the fact of the matter is, even the most charismatic and experienced teachers bore students sometimes. But the good news is, it may not be your fault."


Via Beth Dichter
more...
Beth Dichter's curator insight, February 3, 2013 9:26 PM

This post begins with a quote from Plato who "advised against force-feeding of facts to students" (those are not his words, but his words follow this quote) and then moves to the present day and what we know about learning based on neuroscience research into learning. 

Read about how "stress and curiosity edits which sensory information", how the brain has evolved and must make choices about which information to process based on the multititude of "sensory information" being received. This system, the Reticular Activating System or RAS, determines what passes from the lower brainstem to the higher regions.

Other sections include how the brain receives threats and that when it is not under stress the brain is ready to be engaged and learn. Learn ways to work with students so they are engaged and learning, and willing to answer the question "What did you learn in school today?"

Audrey's comment, February 4, 2013 5:57 AM
Teaching is a two way process. Students of all ages should be encouraged to take a more active part in their learning. When students say to teachers "we want the lesson to be more fun". Why can students not explain what "fun" means? Why can they not demonstrate, using the learning materials how they would like the subject presented in a fun way?