Education for Sustainable Development
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Education for Sustainable Development
Engaging pupils in negotiating a sustainable future
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Scientists Just Made Food From Electricity

Scientists Just Made Food From Electricity | Education for Sustainable Development | Scoop.it




A batch of single-cell protein has been produced by using electricity and carbon dioxide in a joint study by the Lappeenranta University of Technology (LUT) and VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland. Protein produced in this way can be further developed for use as food and animal feed. The method releases food production from restrictions related to the environment. The protein can be produced anywhere renewable energy, such as solar energy, is available."In practice, all the raw materials are available from the air. In the future, the technology can be transported to, for instance, deserts and other areas facing famine. One possible alternative is a home reactor, a type of domestic appliance that the consumer can use to produce the needed protein," explains Juha-Pekka Pitkänen, principal scientist at VTT.Along with food, the researchers are developing the protein to be used as animal feed. The protein created with electricity can be used as a fodder replacement, thus releasing land areas for other purposes, such as forestry. It allows food to be produced where it is needed.$$!ad_code_content_spilt_video_ad!$$"Compared to traditional agriculture, the production method currently under development does not require a location with the conditions for agriculture, such as the right temperature, humidity or a certain soil type. This allows us to use a completely automatised process to produce the animal feed required in a shipping container facility built on the farm. The method requires no pest-control substances. Only the required amount of fertiliser-like nutrients is used in the closed process. This allows us to avoid any environmental impacts, such as runoffs into water systems or the formation of powerful greenhouse gases," says Professor Jero Ahola of LUT.Tenfold energy efficiencyAccording to estimates by the researchers, the process of creating food from electricity can be nearly 10 times as energy-efficient as common photosynthesis, which is used for cultivation of soy and other products. For the product to be competitive, the production process must become even more efficient. 

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There Are So Many Amazing Ways to Fight Food Waste -- This Documentary Is Here to Show You How

There Are So Many Amazing Ways to Fight Food Waste -- This Documentary Is Here to Show You How | Education for Sustainable Development | Scoop.it
It's massive: a new film by Anthony Bourdain takes on America’s gargantuan food waste problem.
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Lim Li Fan Levant's curator insight, August 18, 7:26 PM
I think that food waste can be reduced in Singapore. After all, as a small country, measures to reduce food waste can be implemented more effectively as the population is more concentrated. While not many people are enthusiastic about eating unusual parts of an animal to reduce food waste, I think that simpler measures such as buying the appropriate amount of food to be eaten within their shelf life is a basic and simple means to reduce food waste. Such a measure helps people to understand how much food they really need and remind them not to buy too much food, resulting in food waste, and can also help them to reduce the amount of money spent on food to be used in other areas.
Li Wan Rong's comment, August 18, 9:09 PM
Food wastage is a pressing issue worldwide, and it is highly prevalent in Singapore. With rapid economic development and increasing affluence of many Singaporeans, they are able to enjoy a higher standard of living and can thus afford more goods and services. As Singapore is one of the most food secure countries across the globe, Singaporeans do not have to fret about the lack of food supply and many locals therefore end up buying more than what they need due to our “kiasu” attitude. One way to reduce food wastage is to redistribute the leftover food to poorer families in Singapore, of which some do not even have the financial capability to consume 3 meals per day. However, for fear of ruining their reputation, many food restaurants are hesitant to do so as they will have to bear the consequences of cases of food poisoning (if any). I feel that restaurants can ensure the freshness of the leftover food by preserving them for a short amount of time and also, inform the consumers that the food is to be consumed by a certain timing.
Valerie Tan Yi Jie's comment, Today, 4:07 AM

6.






Food wastage is definitely a problem in Singapore today, and one that warrants our attention. Every day, supermarkets discard an inordinate amount of unwanted or expired food. The situation is not any rosier in homes, where leftover food placed in the fridge often goes forgotten and eventually finds its way to the rubbish chute, after being rendered inedible by days of neglect. Perhaps the most visible and heart-wrenching form of food wastage is the sight of plates littered with food remnants, sometimes even piles of untouched food, strewn across tables in hawker centres, food courts and restaurants. Such was not the case decades ago, when Singapore was still in the infancy of economic development. The problem of food wastage only earned its prevalence in recent years, brought about by the country’s substantial economic progress and the concomitant rise in the affluence level of its people.

Not only is food wastage an utter dissipation of resources, but it is also a grave violation of moral values. The idea that multitudes of people have the moral audacity to dispose of unappetising or excess food while scores of others have to bear with starvation and battle for survival every day is virtually unthinkable.

The alleviation and ultimate resolution of this pressing conundrum requires the commitment of retailers and manufacturers. Since consumers generally shun fruits and vegetables that have damaged appearances, fearing that these might be unappetising as compared to their counterparts, supermarkets could consider selling these goods at lower prices in order to encourage bargain-hunters to purchase them, instead of simply tossing them into the bin. By implementing such a measure, NTUC Fairprice has saved 250 000 kg of food in just a year. Other retailers such as Cold Storage, Giant and Sheng Siong, should follow suit so that more food can share a similar fate. Furthermore, retailers could donate excess food products to charity organisations such as Food from the Heart, so as to ensure that no food goes to waste.

Apart from this, the government should organise a campaign to raise public awareness about food wastage and encourage Singaporeans to do their part in reducing the amount of food being discarded through the dissemination of brochures and the screening of advertisements. School children should also be taught to cherish their food and avoid food wastage as much as possible from a tender age.

Lastly, consumers themselves play an indispensable role in the crusade for the reduction of food wastage, for they are the ones with the power to do so at the grassroots level. Ensuring that one does not purchase excessive food at supermarkets, or over-order at eateries, as well as donating extra edible canned food to charities and other Non-governmental Organisations are but some of the ways in which consumers can play a part in minimising the amount of food being squandered.
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What Our Food Is Really Doing to the Planet, in 15 Jaw-Dropping Images

What Our Food Is Really Doing to the Planet, in 15 Jaw-Dropping Images | Education for Sustainable Development | Scoop.it
When current science news is filled with pictures — incredible, beautiful, literally awesome pictures — of planetary bodies 3 billion miles away, it's easy to forget what's happening on the soil...
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11 tips to cut your food waste

11 tips to cut your food waste | Education for Sustainable Development | Scoop.it
The festive season is just around the corner and for the next few weeks many of us will be planning a gathering or two. There are Christmas dinners, summer barbeques and New Years parties and with ...
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Engineering Nature: How Improved Photosynthesis Could Feed the World

Engineering Nature: How Improved Photosynthesis Could Feed the World | Education for Sustainable Development | Scoop.it
In terms of plants, the concept of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) often refers to the insertion of genetic information from one species of plant to another so that the recipient plant gains a desirable trait. This process has been used extensively to improve crop yields. For example, one type of rice has been made waterproof so that yields aren’t affected by heavy floods from typhoons.

Via THE *OFFICIAL ANDREASCY*
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Meet the Farm That Grows Plants with Zero Sunlight, Soil, Pesticides, or Water

Meet the Farm That Grows Plants with Zero Sunlight, Soil, Pesticides, or Water | Education for Sustainable Development | Scoop.it
With the goal of providing locally sourced food to communities and battling world hunger, AeroFarms will be producing two million pounds of leafy greens a year, all without the use of soil, pesticides, or sunlight,
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ActionAid: Food Used to Fuel Cars in G8 Nations Would Feed 441 ...

ActionAid: Food Used to Fuel Cars in G8 Nations Would Feed 441 ... | Education for Sustainable Development | Scoop.it
Meanwhile a group of UN experts on food and agriculture has concluded that “the rise in prices largely reflects the difficulty that supply has had in keeping up with demand, and because the rise in biofuels has greatly ...
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Sonja Sharp's curator insight, May 10, 2013 3:35 AM

An ongoing issue...is the adoption to greener practices in the G8 countries not happening????? So much for practices and policies, such as the Kyoto Protocol????!

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Food needs 'climate-smart' change

Food needs 'climate-smart' change | Education for Sustainable Development | Scoop.it
Major changes are needed in agriculture and food consumption around the world if future generations are to be adequately fed, a major report warns.

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Population Explosion | The Concord Consortium

Population Explosion | The Concord Consortium | Education for Sustainable Development | Scoop.it
You will use a computer model to study how populations stay in balance with their environment and respond to various factors such as food supply and predators. You will observe population explosions.
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