Education, Curiosity, and Happiness
2.2K views | +1 today
Follow
Education, Curiosity, and Happiness
What roles can curiosity and happiness play in learning?
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from The Daily Leadership Scoop
Scoop.it!

Are You a Self-Aware Leader?

Are You a Self-Aware Leader? | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Organizational psychologist Tasha Eurich says becoming more self-aware can lead to greater success in both your personal and work lives.

Via Kevin Watson, Roger Francis, Dean J. Fusto, Bobby Dillard
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I consider teaching and leading as being synonomous with each other. Being mindful, aware, and present are essential to both.
more...
Ian Berry's curator insight, June 30, 7:37 PM
Lot's of excellent insights. The great paradox of self-awareness (the number one leadership skill in my view) is that we need other people to make sure our awareness is real.
Scooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD
Scoop.it!

New teachers need a master’s support

New teachers need a master’s support | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
David Krulwich, principal of the Urban Assembly School for Applied Math and Science, says new teachers are too often left to fend for themselves, without the benefit of an artisan-apprentice relationship.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Teaching is an art. We teach in isolation throughout our careers, because that is what has always been done.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD
Scoop.it!

Rural Kansas teacher pay ranks lowest in U.S.

Rural Kansas teacher pay ranks lowest in U.S. | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
In his 26 years at Meade Unified School District 226, a 400-student district southwest of Dodge City, Superintendent Kenneth Harshberger has watched the educational landscape change.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
This is a universal issue, which may be a bigger problem in rural areas. Finding new teachers and retaining them are intertwined.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from Evolution of Education
Scoop.it!

The Purposes of High-Quality PBL | Getting Smart by Emily Liebtag

The Purposes of High-Quality PBL | Getting Smart by Emily Liebtag | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
“By Emily Liebtag”
Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Vicki Moro
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Well thought out projects and problems that engage students help them form skills and learn content.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from Cultivating Creativity
Scoop.it!

On the Edge of Chaos: Where Creativity Flourishes

On the Edge of Chaos: Where Creativity Flourishes | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
How does an educator know if she’s creating space for creativity? The way Bilder describes it, students in a classroom that allowed for creativity would appear to a visitor to be enraptured in what they were doing — they’d be in the zone. “You’d have a hard time distracting them and getting them away from what they’re working on,” Bilder said. He highlighted project-based learning as a way that educators are beginning to introduce choice, and thus freedom, into school work, making space for at least some creativity.

COGNITIVE TRAITS OF CREATIVITY

Generating lots of different ideas is more important to creativity than many people realize. That’s partly because of the free flowing nature of coming up with lots of ideas, no matter how ridiculous they seem, but it’s also because it gets the idea out of the brain, making space for the next idea.

Via Jim Lerman
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
"So, can educators help their students become more creative? Some teachers are moving in that direction, loosening the rules, giving students choice, celebrating ideas and behaviors that challenge the status quo, but without a drastic reimagining of the structures within which educators work, true creativity could be hard to find in school."

The constraints on teaching and learning in school are significant.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from The Daily Leadership Scoop
Scoop.it!

5 Questions Leaders Should Be Asking All the Time

5 Questions Leaders Should Be Asking All the Time | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Use them to resolve conflict, challenge old ways of working, and keep things in perspective.

Via donhornsby, Bobby Dillard
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Teaching and leading both depend upon intellectual curiosity. Asking ourselves questions makes a difference. It actually slows things down.
more...
donhornsby's curator insight, June 26, 8:16 AM
Leaders should ask these questions both on a daily basis and during critical moments. Of course, these aren’t the only questions to ask; context certainly matters. But I have found these five to be a very practical and useful way to ensure understanding, generate new ideas, inspire progress, encourage responsibility, and remain focused on what is genuinely important.
 
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from E-Learning-Inclusivo (Mashup)
Scoop.it!

Situated Learning Theory (Lave)

Situated Learning Theory (Lave) | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Summary: Situated Learning Theory posits that learning is unintentional and situated within authentic activity, context, and culture. Originator: Jean Lave Key Terms: Legitimate Peripheral Participation (LPP), Cognitive Apprenticeship Situated Learning Theory (Lave) In contrast with most classroom learning activities that involve abstract knowledge which is and out of context, Lave argues that learning is situated; that is, as it normally occurs, learning is embedded within activity, context and culture. It is also usually unintentional rather than deliberate. Lave and Wenger (1991) call this a process of "legitimate peripheral participation." Knowledge needs to be presented in authentic contexts -- settings and situations that would normally involve that knowledge. Social interaction and collaboration are essential components of situated learning -- learners become involved in a "community of practice" which embodies certain beliefs and behaviors to be acquired. As the beginner or novice moves from the periphery of a community to its center, he or she becomes more active and engaged within the culture and eventually assumes the role of an expert. Other researchers have further developed Situated Learning theory. Brown, Collins & Duguid (1989) emphasize the idea of cognitive apprenticeship: "Cognitive apprenticeship supports learning in a domain by enabling students to acquire, develop and use cognitive tools in authentic domain activity. Learning, both outside and inside school, advances through collaborative social interaction and the social construction of knowledge."

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Bruno De Lièvre, juandoming
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The idea here is that learning happens in and out of school. The learning that occurs in school is taken outside and influences that learning, and vice-versa.

We have used the concept of Communities of Practice as a catch phrase. Vygotsky and Dewey were writing about similar concepts at the same time,
more...
Margarita Parra's curator insight, June 27, 10:36 AM
"Situated Learning Theory posits that learning is unintentional and situated within authentic activity, context, and culture."
Scooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD
Scoop.it!

Intersections and Disjunctures: Scholars, Teachers, and Writers

Intersections and Disjunctures: Scholars, Teachers, and Writers | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Discussing scholars as writers, Michael C. Munger explains, "We train people in methods, and theory, but we don’t tell them that writing is something you have to practice." And that practice, Munger argues, must be "like you exercise: at least a little bit, most days....Furthermore, writing makes you a more focused and attentive reader of…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Like many other subjects/topics we teach, writing needs time, patience, and new ways of thinking about how we teach it.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

Sir Ken Robinson: Finding Market Pressures To Innovate Education | #ModernEDU #Innovation

Sir Ken Robinson: Finding Market Pressures To Innovate Education | #ModernEDU #Innovation | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
I never say that in criticism of teachers or of school principals or even of superintendents. That's something in the culture ─ at least, the political culture ─ of education. There is pressure on the system that gets in the way of what people most urgently need to do in schools to make them more humane and more personal places. There's really a lot more room for innovation in schools than people suspect. A lot of what goes on isn’t required by law; it's more a function of habit and tradition and routine than anything else.”

This habit of tradition and routine is exactly why education has remained woefully behind the times. In the business of education, we don’t have the usual market pressures that require innovation. Public education is a monopoly with no real competition to require forward movement.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=Sir-Ken-Robinson

 


Via Gust MEES
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Educating and school are not synonomous. Educating can happen outside a school and is a 24/7 proposition. It is not subject to market pressures as we have allowed schools to become in a neo-liberal world.
more...
Gust MEES's curator insight, June 24, 3:42 PM
I never say that in criticism of teachers or of school principals or even of superintendents. That's something in the culture ─ at least, the political culture ─ of education. There is pressure on the system that gets in the way of what people most urgently need to do in schools to make them more humane and more personal places. There's really a lot more room for innovation in schools than people suspect. A lot of what goes on isn’t required by law; it's more a function of habit and tradition and routine than anything else.”

This habit of tradition and routine is exactly why education has remained woefully behind the times. In the business of education, we don’t have the usual market pressures that require innovation. Public education is a monopoly with no real competition to require forward movement.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=Sir-Ken-Robinson

 

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from STEM Education
Scoop.it!

Why ‘Unlearning’ Old Habits Is An Essential Step For Innovation

Why ‘Unlearning’ Old Habits Is An Essential Step For Innovation | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Educators at a school near Boston is making the effort to unlearn old habits and perspectives that get in the way of more effective solutions.

Via MIND Research Institute
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
When we learn something, by its very definition, learning is unlearning something.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from Learning & Mind & Brain
Scoop.it!

Nonacademic Skills Are Key To Success. But What Should We Call Them?

Nonacademic Skills Are Key To Success. But What Should We Call Them? | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
More and more people in education agree on the importance of learning stuff other than academics.

But no one agrees on what to call that "stuff".

There are least seven major overlapping terms in play. New ones are being coined all the time. This bagginess bugs me, as a member of the education media. It bugs researchers and policymakers too.

"Basically we're trying to explain student success educationally or in the labor market with skills not directly measured by standardized tests," says Martin West, at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. "The problem is, you go to meetings and everyone spends the first two hours complaining and arguing about semantics."

West studies what he calls "non-cognitive skills." Although he's not completely happy with that term.

The problem isn't just semantic, argues Laura Bornfreund, deputy director of the education policy program at the New America Foundation. She wrote a paper on what she called "Skills for Success," since she didn't like any of these other terms. "There's a lot of different terms floating around but also a lack of agreement on what really is most important to students."

As Noah Webster, the great American lexicographer and educator, put it back in 1788, "The virtues of men are of more consequence to society than their abilities; and for this reason, the heart should be cultivated with more assiduity than the head."

Via Miloš Bajčetić
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Skills are the essential piece in teaching and learning today.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from Disrupting Higher Education
Scoop.it!

LinkedIn CEO Jeff Weiner on America's skill gap and efforts to close it

LinkedIn CEO Jeff Weiner on America's skill gap and efforts to close it | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Latest labor statistics show number of U.S. job openings rose to more than 6M in April, an all-time high

Via Elaine J Roberts, Ph.D.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The main point is a question: "what skills do students need to learn?" It is less about content, which becomes a vehicle for learning skills i.e. cooperation, creativity, resilence, etc.
more...
Elaine J Roberts, Ph.D.'s curator insight, June 23, 10:54 AM

Agree with it or not, Weiner's thinking encapsulates why the "future ready" movement is gaining momentum. While K-12 educators might not know what that really is, they are eager to try to make sure their students are ready for their futures and are, therefore, using the 4Cs (collaboration, critical thinking, communication, and creativity) as part of their framework. Many K-12 teachers and administrators do worry, however, that universities are a stumbling block for their students' success.

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from Purposeful Pedagogy
Scoop.it!

5 Barriers To More Authentic Teaching And Learning - TeachThought PD

5 Barriers To More Authentic Teaching And Learning - TeachThought PD | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

Via Patrice Bucci, Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The five barriers are important to acknowledge: rigid curriculum and standards, fear to testing, and silos and schedules. Schools look and feel much like they did when I went to school in the 1960's. The one change is they are bigger and more crowded.

The article points teachers towards project-based learning. When well thought out, projects engage students and teachers. They offer potential for cross-curricular teaching and teachers teaching together.
more...
Patrice Bucci's curator insight, June 23, 9:51 AM
Wow... when did teaching and learning get so complicated? When we let the policy wonks who never taught create complex mandates!
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from Moral Education
Scoop.it!

Teachers can show young people the good and unifying in society

Teachers can show young people the good and unifying in society | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
It is easy to simplistically set the world as a place of stark opposites, but education has the power to give people hope and reflect our shared values

Via Sarantis Chelmis
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
We live in a world that sometimes overwhelms us. Good teachers can be role models for students and teach in ways that allow young people to see the good in each other.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD
Scoop.it!

5 Productivity Lessons Painfully Learned From Running Marathons

5 Productivity Lessons Painfully Learned From Running Marathons | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Past success is often an indicator of future complacency.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The five key points are past productivity does not guarantee future results, be adaptable, consider inputs, ongoing assessment, and mental toughness.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from Anything and Everything Education
Scoop.it!

Differentiation: The Magic Tool of Teaching

Differentiation: The Magic Tool of Teaching | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
I would like to take this opportunity now to explain some of the best “instructional methods” I have used to enable effective differentiation to take place.

Via Mel Riddile, Lawrence Buck
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Differentiating learning is an essential aspect of good teaching. Having students sit at grade level tables enabled this. They shared, talked, and questioned. There was a barter system of sorts. The artist helped others with art work and was repaid with help in other subjects. "Differences make a difference."
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from Malta Digital Curation and Learning
Scoop.it!

The Illustrated Guide to a PhD: 12 Simple Pictures That Will Put the Daunting Degree into Perspective

The Illustrated Guide to a PhD: 12 Simple Pictures That Will Put the Daunting Degree into Perspective | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it


Matthew Might, a computer science professor at the University of Utah, writes: 'Every fall, I explain to a fresh batch of Ph.D. students what a Ph.D. is. It's hard to describe it in words.
Via Martin Debattista
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Don't forget the larger world. Those are words to remember.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from Cultivating Creativity
Scoop.it!

Creativity and the Brain: What We Can Learn From Jazz Musicians

Creativity and the Brain: What We Can Learn From Jazz Musicians | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

sLuckily, creativity isn’t an unknowable, mystical quality. It can be developed. “You have to cultivate these behaviors by introducing them to children and recognizing that the more you do it, the bettier you are at doing it,” Limb said. The problem is a lot of kids don’t get much unstructured time either in school or out of it. School is often based on right or wrong answers, leaving little room for students to come up with ideas that haven’t been taught to them before.

“It doesn’t have to be so directed all the time,” Limb said. “We’ve taken a lot of the joy out of things that used to be joyful.” Even a lot of music lessons have become about the discipline of learning to play well, not the joy of creating the music. Children should have part of every lesson reserved for improvisation and free form play, Limb said. The same could be said for free play on the playground and experimentation with new ideas in the classroom. Unprogrammed time is necessary for students to practice using their creativity.


Via Jim Lerman
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Improvising makes a difference to a person's brain. Play is another form of jazz. Watching a child play I notice they improvise and solve problems as they encounter them. They puzzle and wonder over their play.

An essential idea in the article is to allow children (and adults) free form play.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from Good News For A Change
Scoop.it!

The Life-Changing Habit of Journaling (Einstein, Leonardo da Vinci, and Many More Great Minds…

The Life-Changing Habit of Journaling (Einstein, Leonardo da Vinci, and Many More Great Minds… | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Ever wondered why history’s great minds including Isaac Newton, Abraham Lincoln, Andy Warhol, Leonardo Da Vinci, Marcus Aurelius, Charles Darwin, Winston Churchill, Benjamin Franklin, Ernest…

Via Bobby Dillard
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Taking time, reflecting (meditating), and writing is essential to one's learning.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from Digital Delights - Digital Tribes
Scoop.it!

You Do Not Think Alone

You Do Not Think Alone | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
A new book argues that thought and knowledge are community efforts

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
It is not possible for one person to know everything. A concern I have is we have moved towards an insular way of being that is not healthy. Dewey and Gadamer underscored the essential aspects of community and communicating.
more...
Deanna Mascle's curator insight, June 27, 11:09 AM
our intelligence depends on the people and things that surround us
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from Master Leren & Innoveren
Scoop.it!

A Novice→Expert Model of Learning - David Didau: The Learning Spy

A Novice→Expert Model of Learning - David Didau: The Learning Spy | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Every artist was first an amateur. Ralph Waldo Emerson One of the best understood principles of cognitive psychology is that novices learn and think differently to experts. These labels are domain-specific, not person-specific; I can be an expert at particle physics whilst still being a novice at evolutionary biology. Or skateboarding. Similarly, you could be
Via Jeroen Bottema
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The post explores learning for novices, which is more superficial and, as we become more expert, it deepens. The Dreyfus model of skill acquisition is referenced. Hubert Dreyfus is critical of overusing digital tools and the Internet in learning.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from All digital
Scoop.it!

Cultivating Communication in the Classroom

Cultivating Communication in the Classroom | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Lisa Johnson, author of Cultivating Communication in the Classroom, shares how to foster positive interactions in and out of school in this interview.

Via Mark E. Deschaine, PhD, Stephania Savva, Ph.D
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Communicating with each other is about sharing and forming community. It is learning about the other person, what makes them like us and different.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD
Scoop.it!

How students learn/ test mania / stressed teachers / lessons from Leonardo da Vinci

How students learn/ test mania / stressed teachers / lessons from Leonardo da Vinci | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Education Readings By Allan Alach I welcome suggested articles, so if you come across a gem, email it to me a
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The article that stuck out for me was the one about not looking for best practices. Teachers share, but we cannot take something that worked in another classroom setting and apply it to what we are doing. In fact, it may not work well a second time in the same classroom.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from Assessment | Learning and Teaching | Coaching
Scoop.it!

Mastering the Teaching Game

Mastering the Teaching Game | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
After listening to an interview with top tennis coach Sven Groeneveld, Carol Tomlinson clarifies eight essential principles that teaching shares with high-level sports coaching.
Via Ines Bieler
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I am not sure good teachers think they master teaching. I wanted to become better each day.

Having said that, Carol Tomlinson offers good ideas about how to become a better teacher: drive to succeed, accepting responsibility for one's teaching, serving through teaching, etc.

Responsibility is essential. We should remember we are responsible for teaching, not learning, and should ask what that means in our context.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from E-Learning-Inclusivo (Mashup)
Scoop.it!

What is self-efficacy and how can we help our students to get more of it?

What is self-efficacy and how can we help our students to get more of it? | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
"If you think you can, you probably can.  If you think you can't, well that self limiting and self-fulfilling belief might well stop you doing something you're perfectly capable of doing." Albert Bandura Last week I was fortunate enough to be asked to talk at the Osiris Teaching & Learning conference, with Andy Tharby about…

Via juandoming
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Self-efficacy and one's confidence are formed on what a person has succeeded at doing in the past. It occurs in a zone that overlaps comfort and discomfort. Good teachers model, coach, and offer students feedback as they form self-efficacy.
more...
No comment yet.