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Education, Curiosity, and Happiness
What roles can curiosity and happiness play in learning?
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Why Do Teachers Quit?

Why Do Teachers Quit? | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
And why do they stay?

Via Lance Weihmuller, Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

A lack of respect is a substantial reason. I left because of it and many others stay despite it. It is not a lack of respect from students and parents. It is from colleagues and administrators.

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Nice Managers Embrace Conflict, Too

Nice Managers Embrace Conflict, Too | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
It's OK to channel Don Corleone every once in a while.

Via Roger Francis, David Hain, Bobby Dillard
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

"Recognize employees who question the status quo. When employees take the risk of creating a productive disruption, give them positive reinforcement. If someone pushes back or raises an uncomfortable question in a meeting, back them up rather than shut them down. If possible, use it as a teachable moment to encourage others to do the same.

Set ground rules for conflict. Since everyone struggles with conflict to some degree, develop a few standards for how your team can manage it constructively. For example in one company’s review sessions, participants need to begin with at least two positive comments before anyone is allowed to throw in a criticism. Although it feels a little awkward at times, this practice forces everyone to take a more balanced view of other people’s work, which reduces the tension and allows for more productive discussions. In another firm, every meeting ends with five minutes of what’s called a “plus/delta” critique of the meeting – with quick comments about what was good about it and what should be changed the next time. Again, this more structured practice makes it easy and acceptable to openly and constructively criticize."

 

Not everything can be structured, but the creation of a healthy environment where questions are welcome is essential.

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David Hain's curator insight, October 17, 2013 6:19 AM

But for most people it involves more than putting cotton wool buds in their mouths.  Focus on being respected not liked, say what you think, and both respect and affection will rise.

donhornsby's curator insight, October 17, 2013 7:55 AM

(From the article): In the short-term, it’s almost always easier to avoid conflict and come across as being a “nice” manager. But more often than not, being a little less nice might be the best thing for your people, your organization, and you.

Don Cloud's curator insight, October 17, 2013 9:42 PM

Leadership is about making the right decisions for the right reasons ... and at times, conflict is the right answer.

 

For example, if someone is failing to meet expectations or standards, is the right answer to simply be nice and let it slide (avoiding confrontation) or to be honest and confront the individual to give them the opportunity to improve?

 

If someone violates trust, the values of the organization, or the ethical standards of the profession, have they not initiated the conflict?  In these cases, it is the leaders duty to confront the problem openly and transparently in order to enforce accountability.

 

To quote General Curtis LeMay, "I don't mind being called tough, because in this racket it's tough guys who lead the survivors."

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"..the power to make change happen is not in someone else’s hands, but yours" - You're Ok, Now Let's Make A Change

"..the power to make change happen is not in someone else’s hands, but yours" - You're Ok, Now Let's Make A Change | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
As a young couple in the 70’s, my parent’s library consisted of a closet bookshelf. I developed my love of reading by carefully studying...

Via Anne Leong
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

When we understand there are roles, there is a certain stablity that comes with it. It is not certainty but a sense of stablity in otherwise chaotic lives.

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Learning to learn: losing yourself in passion

Learning to learn: losing yourself in passion | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

 

Learning to learn: losing yourself in passionPosted on August 30, 2013 by Ally — 14 Comments ↓

 

Have you ever noticed that, when we’re younger, school and learning seem like a chore, and yet when we’re older, we wish we could just spend all of our time consuming information and advancing our knowledge?

Perhaps this is because our minds have matured with age, or simply because we always want to do things once we don’t have to. Or, maybe it’s because once we’ve been through certain experiences, we’re more capable of identifying our true passions.

I recently had a conversation with a friend of mine who also happens to be an entrepreneur named Josh. (Whether he knew it or not, picking his brain was actually a part of my mission to learn more about entrepreneurship and running a business.) I was interested to hear that, once he started a company, even though it was based around his passion for social media, a large part of his work days consists of administrative and management-related tasks. In explaining this, he said the following:

“I work hard during the day, but at night I get to plan the future and expand my knowledge.”

There was my answer. As human beings, we may not always be able to spend all of our lives doing exactly what we want to be doing, but as long as there is something that we “get” to learn about in our off time, the drive will never fade.

How is it, then, that we come across this special subject? First, let’s figure out what passion actually is. According to Merriam Webster, passion is an “intense, driving, or overmastering feeling or conviction.” When I hear this definition, a few things come to my head: social media, relationship building, and innovation, to name a few. What comes to yours?

If there isn’t anything that instantly comes to mind, try doing a few of these exercises:

Ask yourself, “What would I do with my life if money didn’t matter?”Talk casually with your friends and colleagues and observe what makes you go on for hours.Wander into a bookstore. What section do you immediately go for?

-Allow your brain to follow its own course. The things you don’t have to try to think about are usually the ones you end up giving the majority of your thoughts to.

Finding, and subsequently losing yourself in, your passion may not be easy, but when it does happen, it sure is worth it. Is there topic that you constantly find yourself coming back to in your reading and conversations? One that, once you start reading about it, the hours pass like minutes? Identify it, roll with it, and lose yourself in it.

And in case you needed one last bit of inspiration, I leave you with Josh’s words:

“Let’s say, you’re sitting in a coffee shop, minding your own business, and the person at the table over starts talking about a specific subject. You may only hear a word or two, but it’s enough. It registers. And before you realize it you’ve stopped everything you’re doing. Focusing on your own task/conversation/activity suddenly becomes impossible. Your heart beats super fast because you’re doing everything in your power not to compulsively jump in, ask questions, correct them, and find out who they are.”

 


Via Lynnette Van Dyke
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Learning should be about learning.

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Smart Strategies That Help Students Learn How to Learn

Smart Strategies That Help Students Learn How to Learn | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
What’s the key to effective learning? One intriguing body of research suggests a rather riddle-like answer: It’s not just what you know. It’s what you know about what you know.

Via Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Learning how to learn is more important than content. In an increasingly complex and face-paced world it is essential students know how to learn.

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Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.'s curator insight, October 7, 2013 6:56 PM

Developing those smart strategies within the 21st century learner...

Lynnette Van Dyke's curator insight, October 8, 2013 12:50 PM
Teaching StrategiesSmart Strategies That Help Students Learn How to LearnAnnie Murphy Paul | October 7, 2013 | 7 Comments PrintinShare41Email Post

Bruce Guenter

 

What’s the key to effective learning? One intriguing body of research suggests a rather riddle-like answer: It’s not just what you know. It’s what you know about what you know.

To put it in more straightforward terms, anytime a student learns, he or she has to bring in two kinds of prior knowledge: knowledge about the subject at hand (say, mathematics or history) and knowledge about how learning works. Parents and educators are pretty good at imparting the first kind of knowledge. We’re comfortable talking about concrete information: names, dates, numbers, facts. But the guidance we offer on the act of learning itself—the “metacognitive” aspects of learning—is more hit-or-miss, and it shows.

In our schools, “the emphasis is on what students need to learn, whereas little emphasis—if any—is placed on training students how they should go about learning the content and what skills will promote efficient studying to support robust learning,” writes John Dunlosky, professor of psychology at Kent State University in Ohio, in an article just published in American Educator. However, he continues, “teaching students how to learn is as important as teaching them content, because acquiring both the right learning strategies and background knowledge is important—if not essential—for promoting lifelong learning.”

“Teaching students how to learn is as important as teaching them content.”

Research has found that students vary widely in what they know about how to learn, according to a team of educational researchers from Australia writing last year in the journal Instructional Science. Most striking, low-achieving students show “substantial deficits” in their awareness of the cognitive and metacognitive strategies that lead to effective learning—suggesting that these students’ struggles may be due in part to a gap in their knowledge about how learning works.

Teaching students good learning strategies would ensure that they know how to acquire new knowledge, which leads to improved learning outcomes, writes lead author Helen Askell-Williams of Flinders University in Adelaide, Australia. And studies bear this out. Askell-Williams cites as one example a recent finding by PISA, the Programme for International Student Assessment, which administers academic proficiency tests to students around the globe, and place American students in the mediocre middle. “Students who use appropriate strategies to understand and remember what they read, such as underlining important parts of the texts or discussing what they read with other people, perform at least 73 points higher in the PISA assessment—that is, one full proficiency level or nearly two full school years—than students who use these strategies the least,” the PISA report reads.

[RELATED: What Students Should Know About Their Own Brains]

In their own study, Askell-Williams and her coauthors took as their subjects 1,388 Australian high school students. They first administered an assessment to find out how much the students knew about cognitive and metacognitive learning strategies—and found that their familiarity with these tactics was “less than optimal.”

Students can assess their own awareness by asking themselves which of the following learning strategies they regularly use (the response to each item is ideally “yes”):

• I draw pictures or diagrams to help me understand this subject.

• I make up questions that I try to answer about this subject.

• When I am learning something new in this subject, I think back to what I already know about it.

• I discuss what I am doing in this subject with others.

• I practice things over and over until I know them well in this subject.

• I think about my thinking, to check if I understand the ideas in this subject.

• When I don’t understand something in this subject I go back over it again.

• I make a note of things that I don’t understand very well in this subject, so that I can follow them up.

• When I have finished an activity in this subject I look back to see how well I did.

• I organize my time to manage my learning in this subject.

• I make plans for how to do the activities in this subject.

Askell-Williams and her colleagues found that those students who used fewer of these strategies reported more difficulty coping with their schoolwork. For the second part of their study, they designed a series of proactive questions for teachers to drop into the lesson on a “just-in-time” basis—at the moments when students could use the prompting most. These questions, too, can be adopted by any parent or educator to make sure that children know not just what is to be learned, but how.

• What is the topic for today’s lesson?

• What will be important ideas in today’s lesson?

• What do you already know about this topic?

• What can you relate this to?

• What will you do to remember the key ideas?

• Is there anything about this topic you don’t understand, or are not clear about?

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Higher Perspective: 10 Easy Things That Will Make You Happier, Backed By Science

Higher Perspective: 10 Easy Things That Will Make You Happier, Backed By Science | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

Via Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Most of this has been established through scientific research.

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Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor's curator insight, October 2, 2013 8:43 PM
Happiness is so interesting, because we all have different ideas about what it is and how to get it. So naturally we are obsessed with it.
I would love to be happier, as I’m sure most people would, so I thought it would be interesting to find some ways to become a happier person that are actually backed up by science. Here are ten of the best ones I found.
1. Exercise more – 7 minutes might be enough
You might have seen some talk recently about the scientific 7 minute workout mentioned in The New York Times. So if you thought exercise was something you didn’t have time for, maybe you can fit it in after all.
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Dan Pink: My 5 favorite talks on work | TED Playlists | TED

Dan Pink: My 5 favorite talks on work | TED Playlists | TED | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Popular business author Dan Pink picks his 5 favorite TED Talks on how to find greater success at work.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

There are five pretty good videos here.

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Students' happiness at school goes a long way in learning

Students' happiness at school goes a long way in learning | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Got out an old study of school climate that my good and faithful research team conducted a fistful of years back.

Via Mary Meduna, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

We are more likely to learn if we are in a good frame of mind. Eudomic happiness is such a frame. It helps us recognize students are not anxious, fearful, upset, etc.

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Mary Meduna, PhD's curator insight, September 16, 2013 3:49 PM

This seems like common sense when you read it, but I think school climate gets pushed aside too often when we talk about student performance. I think that many teachers and adminstrators have moved away from creating need satisfying environments because of the high pressure to "make" kids perform. This pressure has created a more restrictive environment for the students and for the staff. Yes, I think we can have both--high performing AND happy students. In fact, I will even say that in order to have high performing students we must teach kids and give them the space to be happy. I'll go even one step further and add that the environment also needs to be need satisfying for the adults. (The difference is that the adults have the power to create the environment, the students do not).

 

What are your thoughts?

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Do Some Good! Our Genes Respond Positively to The Right Kind of Happiness

Do Some Good! Our Genes Respond Positively to The Right Kind of Happiness | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
The right kind of happiness doesn't just feel great, it also benefits the body, right down to its instructional code.

Via Anne Leong
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

There is a growing and substantial body of research supporting the eduomic form of happiness.

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Leadership: Inconsistent Bossing: A Surefire Way to Disengage

Leadership: Inconsistent Bossing: A Surefire Way to Disengage | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

Via Anne Leong
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

True enough and being consistently ineffective is also problematic.

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New survey shows teacher engagement peaks 1st year - KMBZ

New survey shows teacher engagement peaks 1st year - KMBZ | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

New survey shows teacher engagement peaks 1st year KMBZ "Teacher engagement is the number one predictor of student engagement, which is a great predictor of student achievement," he told KMBZ.


Via Mary Perfitt-Nelson
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

"While teachers actually rank quite high for engagement compared to other professions, Lopez says its more important for teachers to feel like they have a say in what goes on at work."


Rarely, was I asked to contribute and when I offered I was shunted into something other than what I expressed an interest in.

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Cindy Riley Klages's curator insight, August 17, 2013 9:14 AM

Wow!  Love the statement that "[T}eacher engagement is the number one predictor of student engagement, which is a great predictor of student achievement."  This is what we preach @ARIALSDE.  We also know that which classroom a student is in matters.... What can we do to get the other 2/3 to engage?

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Psychological Resilience and Positive Emotional Granularity: Examining the Benefits of Positive Emotions on Coping and Health

Psychological Resilience and Positive Emotional Granularity: Examining the Benefits of Positive Emotions on Coping and Health | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

Via Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

We are able to study what impacts our happiness more and more.

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10 Simple, Science-Backed Ways To Be Happier Today

10 Simple, Science-Backed Ways To Be Happier Today | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Did you know that the perfect temperature for happiness is 13.9C Adjust your thermostat then check out these quick tips for maximizing mirth.

Via Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Two very important themes are mediation and healthy relationships. Work is an unhappy place for many and those who have positive relationships outside work are happier.

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Howard Gardner: ‘Multiple intelligences’ are not ‘learning styles’ - Washington Post

Howard Gardner: ‘Multiple intelligences’ are not ‘learning styles’ - Washington Post | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
The famed psychologist explains why one is not the other though they are often confused.

Via John Evans, Mary Perfitt-Nelson
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Makes good clarification points.

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Tom Hood's curator insight, October 19, 2013 11:35 AM

I am a fan of Gardner and his Five MInds for the Future. This new work is needed and I like the emphasis on designing learning to work with these multiple intelligences. In this world of rapid change and increasing complexity, learning is THE competitive advantage we can control. 

Ante Lauc's curator insight, October 21, 2013 3:39 AM

For me the most important is moral and emotional intelligence, than cognitive and other that HG did discover.

Rhiannon Boyd's curator insight, November 18, 2013 8:33 PM

From the article: 

 "On the basis of research in several disciplines, including the study of how human capacities are represented in the brain, I developed the idea that each of us has a number of relatively independent mental faculties, which can be termed our “multiple intelligences.” The basic idea is simplicity itself. A belief in a single intelligence assumes that we have one central, all-purpose computer—and it determines how well we perform in every sector of life. In contrast, a belief in multiple intelligences assumes that we have a number of relatively autonomous computers—one that computes linguistic information, another spatial information, another musical information, another information about other people, and so on." - HG

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What saying 'I' says about you

What saying 'I' says about you | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Researchers say that your usage of the pronoun 'I' says more about you than you may realize.

Via Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I wonder what it means when the person who overuses "I" has no real authority based on experience?

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Sharrock's curator insight, October 10, 2013 10:39 AM

One interesting statement: "Avoiding the first-person pronoun is distancing." I would be interested in the book "The Secret Life of Pronouns" just to find out why people refer to themselves in the third person (techically, using one's name when talking about oneself is not often using a pronoun, but maybe cognitively, it is. 

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Why Bosses Think They're Stressed When They're Not

Why Bosses Think They're Stressed When They're Not | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Relax: If you're on top you're not really that worried. Just ask science.

Via george_reed
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

We need a certain amount of stress in life, but bosses need to be aware when too much is too much.

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george_reed's curator insight, October 8, 2013 3:17 PM

It's not that the bosses aren't stressed, it's just that their subordinates are even more stressed. 

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The Foundational Importance Of Trust In Management

The Foundational Importance Of Trust In Management | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Trust is a fragile commodity in management, yet an exceedingly valuable one. It can make the difference between an employee who is emotionally committed to an organization - or destructive.

Via Andrea Johnson
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The opening line says it all. Leadership and management is all about trust, gaining it and retaining it. It cannot be cognitized and made into something we know about but cannot do.

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Article | Creating a Positive Classroom Environment

Article | Creating a Positive Classroom Environment | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

When you plant lettuce, if it does not grow well, you don't blame the lettuce. You look into the reasons it is not doing well. It may need fertilizer, or more water, or less sun. You never blame th...


Via ICTPHMS
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

And, not a mention about technology; that is interesting.

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Re-Imagining Work

How can we get people more engaged, more productive, and happier at work? Is technology part of the problem - and could it also be part of the solution?


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Yes, technology is part of the problem. No, technology is not part of the problem. The problem is exacerbated by people.

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Sandeep Gautam's curator insight, October 3, 2013 1:17 AM

 a really good talk about what flexible working really means!

bancoideas's curator insight, October 3, 2013 12:46 PM

Algunas #ideas interesante sobre el #trabajo en nuestros tiempos

Eliane Fierro's curator insight, October 3, 2013 5:32 PM

Are the office spaces that we have created fit for purpose? How can you create trust and be able to innovate in the creation of work spaces?

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What Happened to Employee Loyalty?

What Happened to Employee Loyalty? | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
I wrote a Q & A column advising a guy who was conflicted about his work obligations versus his commitments at home.This fellow's job put him in situations where on a moment's notice, he'd have to

Via Danielle M. Villegas, Amy Melendez
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

A look at the research tells us that in the early 1980's companies began downsizing. This is a chicken and egg scenario. What loyalty disappeared first: employer or employee?

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Danielle M. Villegas's curator insight, September 18, 2013 12:32 PM

I could relate to this article too well. Having been a consultant or temp for the past five years, and not being able to find permanent work vs. contract work, the same still applies very often. The same expectations are made to do your duties and perform as if you are an employee, yet you don't even get the same benefits or treatment. Some would argue that some consultants make a lot of money, so they can afford to get their own benefits, but I have yet to find that to be true. In two out of three cases of my own, I was actually underpaid by half. But the treatment--even as someone who is technically a non-employee--is the same. We just have even more on the line, at least based on my own experiences. Sometimes we have good experiences, and sometimes we have not so good. Consultants/temps are always on the bottom of the totem pole, as it is. We put in the same work, but given less credit very often. Not always, but usually.  

This is definitely a must-read. It's a dynamic that all companies have to work on getting the right balance.

--techcommgeekmom 

John Michel's curator insight, September 18, 2013 1:54 PM

It isn't difficult to earn the loyalty of our team members. We only need to be loyal, back.

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Five Simple Steps for Helping Students Write Ethnographic Papers | Teaching Culture

Five Simple Steps for Helping Students Write Ethnographic Papers | Teaching Culture | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Teaching students how to write ethnographic papers http://t.co/WyC2G2xqSL #acwri

Via Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

It could be helpful as I move through the dissertation process which is likely to involve ethnographic research.

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Leading Beyond the Status Quo – Leading Towards Happiness and Inclusion | WebTalkRadio.net

Leading Beyond the Status Quo – Leading Towards Happiness and Inclusion | WebTalkRadio.net | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

Did you know that happiness is linked to the level of inclusion in the workplace? Research shows that when we are happy, we are more open and less biased


Via AlGonzalezinfo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This is an interesting title`Chief Happiness Officer

 

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AlGonzalezinfo's curator insight, August 21, 2013 7:26 AM

Research shows that when we are happy, we are more open and less biased towards others! Not only that, we are more accepting of our friends and colleagues when we are happy.

 

In this podcast, we explore the critical role of happiness in the workplace. The Chief Happiness Officer Alexander Kjerulf, joins us to explore ways in which we can promote happiness at work by becoming less self-focused, helping others be more productive, AND implementing inclusive work practices.

 

Creating a happy culture helps our people be more productive and engaged. An essential component of the Triple Bottom Line!

 

The podcast can be accessed at:  http://bit.ly/1d17Pyy

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Truly Human Leadership: Why You Should Value Your People - Forbes

Truly Human Leadership: Why You Should Value Your People - Forbes | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Truly Human Leadership: Why You Should Value Your People Forbes In the book, Mackey outlines four principles by which some of America's most successful and highly regarded companies operate: higher purpose, stakeholder integration, conscious...

Via Roy Sheneman, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

You should appreciate the people that work in your organizations. They are not commoditites.

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More Than a Klout Number!

More Than a Klout Number! | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
I’ve never liked the idea of being graded – of my worth and usefulness in this world being governed by a number.  And yet, lists, numbers and grades are central components of what social media is a...

Via AlGonzalezinfo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

"I’ve never liked the idea of being graded – of my worth and usefulness in this world being governed by a number.  And yet, lists, numbers and grades are central components of what social media is all about!"

 

Interesting observations are made.

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AlGonzalezinfo's curator insight, August 16, 2013 2:31 PM

Interesting post here about the need to understand Klout works and why it matters. 

 

From the post:

 

Use Scheduling Tools Like Tweetdeck and Buffer

 

I recently discussed how tools like Buffer help to increase your interaction and engagement levels on your key platforms.  Scheduling apps help you to optimize the times you send out your posts and tweets, allowing for high traffic exposure and increasing the likelihood of  you receiving those all important Likes, click-throughs and Retweets.

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What is Appreciative Inquiry? | aboutleaders.com

What is Appreciative Inquiry? | aboutleaders.com | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
What is Appreciative Inquiry anyway? Have you ever heard: People join organizations, but leave managers. What would your employees say about you?
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Appreciative inquiry is a cornerstone of postive and fulfilling environments. What works well and what do people feel they contribute are important and often unasked questions.

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