Education, Curiosity, and Happiness
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Education, Curiosity, and Happiness
What roles can curiosity and happiness play in learning?
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10 Easy Things That Will Make You Happier, Backed By Science - The Mind Unleashed

10 Easy Things That Will Make You Happier, Backed By Science - The Mind Unleashed | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

Happiness is so interesting, because we all have different ideas about what it is and how to get it. So naturally we are obsessed with it.. I would love to be happier, as I’m sure most people would, so I thought it would be interesting to find some ways to become a happier person that are actually backed up by science. Here are ten of the best ones I found


Via Belinda MJ.B, Bobby Dillard, Dr. Amy Fuller, David Hain, Roy Sheneman, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

These are interesting and common sense ideas. The one about moving closer to work helps with sleeping more and not spending time worrying about work on the drive to and from.

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Carma Lisa Arrendell's curator insight, January 25, 2014 10:08 AM

I believe happiness is intrinsic. Material possession can bring happiness, yet it is short term. Here is an interesting article backed up by science. Note it includes exercise. A great way to cope is excercise and it releases endorphines.

Carma Lisa Arrendell's curator insight, January 25, 2014 10:13 AM

I believe happiness is intrinsic. Material possessions can bring a bit of happiness, yet is fleeting. Note, exercise is included. It releases endrophins.

Carma Lisa Arrendell's curator insight, January 25, 2014 10:20 AM
Lisa C. Arrendell's insight:

I believe happiness is intrinsic. Material possessions can bring a bit of happiness, yet is fleeting. Note, exercise is included. It releases endrophins.

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Lectures Didn't Work in 1350—and They Still Don't Work Today

Lectures Didn't Work in 1350—and They Still Don't Work Today | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
A conversation with David Thornburg about designing a better classroom

Via Nancy Jones
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

School has not been a happy place for many of us. We need real conversations rather than a continuation of the same old same old.

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Tom Hood's curator insight, November 17, 2013 8:34 AM

It is really about learner engagement.

 

Exactly why we have added new particpation techniques and tools like Insights to Go, Conferences.io, ThinkTank, #MBSN (Management By Sticky Notes and more to our professional development programming. 

 

See our release about a New Era in Talent Development and Learning http://cpa.tc/32f

Diane Johnson's curator insight, November 17, 2013 2:12 PM

Interesting considerations for reimagining school.

Agron S. Dida's comment, November 20, 2013 8:47 AM
Diane, thank you for great article. I just changed the cover picture and re-Scooped it.
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Webquests - An Introductory Guide and Resources


Via Malachy Scullion
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Webquests are a great tool for learning when picked carefully and there is time provided for successful completion. They cut across disciplines and allow excellent collaborative opportunities.

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Leadership Is a Conversation

Leadership Is a Conversation | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

Via Anne Leong, Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

It is and many educational 'leaders' are not up to it.

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Andrew Hockley's curator insight, November 11, 2013 7:43 AM

Register for free at the HBR site and get 4 free articles a month.  This is a fantastic deal. 

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The Neuroscience Of Learning: 41 Terms Every Teacher Should Know

The Neuroscience Of Learning: 41 Terms Every Teacher Should Know | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
The Neuroscience Of Learning: 41 Terms Every Teacher Should Know

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge, Margarida Sá Costa
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This is interesting. I recognized some, but not others.

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Pamela D Lloyd's curator insight, November 8, 2013 10:25 PM

This article is part of a larger, on-going effort to help connect teachers and other learning professionals with the neuroscience of learning.

Moses B. Tambason's curator insight, November 9, 2013 2:40 PM

More people are running to charity tube to post free videos and watch free videos than posting on you tube. Try posting at charity tube and you will never leave. http://www.africatube.net/ More visitors and more video views. Don't take our word for it, try it. Post one same video on youtube and put it on  http://www.africatube.net/ and return ater five hours and compare the viewers rate and decide for yourself. Create your very own group or forum and control who watch it and invite everyone to watch the video. Above all, post video in English or in any language and viewers can watch video description in their own language. Try it and let us know your experience. Above all it is absolutely free like youtube

Vincent Munch's curator insight, November 25, 2013 12:51 PM

Something we should all read

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Does power make you mean?

Does power make you mean? | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Research suggests that a default brain mechanism may cause us to lose empathy when we gain power. So promotions really do make us mean.

 

In one of the first studies to make this claim, scientists now say a default brain mechanism may cause us to lose empathy when we gain power...

 

Obhi and his team found feelings of increased powerfulness shut down our mirroring system -- and potentially our empathy -- through a default mechanism in our brains.

 

Liza Aziz-Zadeh, assistant professor at the University of Southern California, studies empathy from a neuroscience perspective and says the findings are interesting. "People who activate their mirroring system more, also score higher on empathy."

 

By Susanne Gargiulo, CNN


Via Edwin Rutsch, David Hain, Wise Leader™, Roy Sheneman, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This is an interesting study. What about those who begin with little or no empathy?

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Jennifer Wu's curator insight, October 25, 2013 10:27 PM

MIRROR NEURONS:  People who activate their mirroring system more, also score higher on empathy.

AlGonzalezinfo's curator insight, October 30, 2013 9:29 AM

Very interesting.  I especially like the following section:

 

"What we have found is that when people get power and move up, but don't understand how to relate, don't communicate well, and appear insensitive, cold, and authoritarian -- that ultimately derails their careers," he says.

 

This comes at an enormous cost in time, money, and morale to companies, he adds.

 

 

"In practical terms, this type of research may eventually be used and put together with training programs like mindfulness training and educational workshops for executives to deal with power better," says Obhi, but adds that we are only just beginning to understand the effects of power.

Monique Nillessen's curator insight, November 11, 2013 8:01 AM

Hopefully this study is wrong! So when you go up in the rankings, please practice empathy, to keep the standards up.

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Why Women Collaborate, Men Work Alone, And Everybody's Angry

Why Women Collaborate, Men Work Alone, And Everybody's Angry | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
At the intersection of selfishness and team structure is an interesting lesson about gender.

Via donhornsby
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

It is an interesting point about the inverse relationship between collaboration and women's pay. Perhaps, the demand for collaboration is part of the myth we build around organizations?

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donhornsby's curator insight, October 24, 2013 9:16 AM

(From the article): So if compensation is clearly oriented toward the team, then men will jump at the chance to work more closely with their colleagues. This shows how something as simple as organizational structures--which are easy to leave unexamined--shape the behavior of the people in them. Which is why, perhaps, we should take an update from Yammer, the enterprise social network, and start iterating the way we construct our companies.

donhornsby's curator insight, October 24, 2013 9:17 AM

(From the article): So if compensation is clearly oriented toward the team, then men will jump at the chance to work more closely with their colleagues. This shows how something as simple as organizational structures--which are easy to leave unexamined--shape the behavior of the people in them. Which is why, perhaps, we should take an update from Yammer, the enterprise social network, and start iterating the way we construct our companies.

Doris Palomino's curator insight, October 24, 2013 6:02 PM

"In short, men tend to overestimate their abilities and downplay those of their coworkers, while women shortchange their skills and defer to their peers".

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Motivating Students with Teaching Techniques that Establish Relevance, Promote Autonomy ~ Faculty Focus

Motivating Students with Teaching Techniques that Establish Relevance, Promote Autonomy ~ Faculty Focus | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
by Katherine Robertson, PhD
 
"Underachievement in college students is linked to lack of motivation (Balduf, 2009 and references therein).

Via Jim Lerman, Kim Flintoff, Blaine Morrow
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Technique in Ellulian language is problematic. We need to go beyond formula and to relational ways.

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The Not-So-Hidden Cause Behind the A.D.H.D. Epidemic

The Not-So-Hidden Cause Behind the A.D.H.D. Epidemic | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
How educational policy and the D.S.M. helped to make a disorder go viral.

Via Nancy Jones
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

It is not a made up ailment, but the way we school and fail to educate children is at the heart of it. It is the way we deal with what is not familiar.

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Nancy Jones's curator insight, October 23, 2013 12:07 PM

This just makes so much sense and, in many ways, is really sad. Something needs to change! What IS childhood supposed to be about?

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The Future of Work is NOT About Replacing Sharepoint and Email

The Future of Work is NOT About Replacing Sharepoint and Email | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

The future of work is not about replacing sharepoint and email, it’s about re-defining what work means, why we work, and how we work.  Pass this along to anyone who thinks otherwise.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen, David Hain
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

We needed to begin the conversation that redefined work a long time ago.

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David Hain's curator insight, October 21, 2013 12:11 PM

Made me laugh, but I should be despairing really...

Philippe Rivalant's curator insight, October 22, 2013 10:21 AM

nous parlons d'une évolution du travail ou peut-être d'une révolution du travail...

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Why Do Teachers Quit?

Why Do Teachers Quit? | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
And why do they stay?

Via Lance W. , Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

A lack of respect is a substantial reason. I left because of it and many others stay despite it. It is not a lack of respect from students and parents. It is from colleagues and administrators.

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Nice Managers Embrace Conflict, Too

Nice Managers Embrace Conflict, Too | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
It's OK to channel Don Corleone every once in a while.

Via Roger Francis, David Hain, Bobby Dillard
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

"Recognize employees who question the status quo. When employees take the risk of creating a productive disruption, give them positive reinforcement. If someone pushes back or raises an uncomfortable question in a meeting, back them up rather than shut them down. If possible, use it as a teachable moment to encourage others to do the same.

Set ground rules for conflict. Since everyone struggles with conflict to some degree, develop a few standards for how your team can manage it constructively. For example in one company’s review sessions, participants need to begin with at least two positive comments before anyone is allowed to throw in a criticism. Although it feels a little awkward at times, this practice forces everyone to take a more balanced view of other people’s work, which reduces the tension and allows for more productive discussions. In another firm, every meeting ends with five minutes of what’s called a “plus/delta” critique of the meeting – with quick comments about what was good about it and what should be changed the next time. Again, this more structured practice makes it easy and acceptable to openly and constructively criticize."

 

Not everything can be structured, but the creation of a healthy environment where questions are welcome is essential.

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David Hain's curator insight, October 17, 2013 6:19 AM

But for most people it involves more than putting cotton wool buds in their mouths.  Focus on being respected not liked, say what you think, and both respect and affection will rise.

donhornsby's curator insight, October 17, 2013 7:55 AM

(From the article): In the short-term, it’s almost always easier to avoid conflict and come across as being a “nice” manager. But more often than not, being a little less nice might be the best thing for your people, your organization, and you.

Don Cloud's curator insight, October 17, 2013 9:42 PM

Leadership is about making the right decisions for the right reasons ... and at times, conflict is the right answer.

 

For example, if someone is failing to meet expectations or standards, is the right answer to simply be nice and let it slide (avoiding confrontation) or to be honest and confront the individual to give them the opportunity to improve?

 

If someone violates trust, the values of the organization, or the ethical standards of the profession, have they not initiated the conflict?  In these cases, it is the leaders duty to confront the problem openly and transparently in order to enforce accountability.

 

To quote General Curtis LeMay, "I don't mind being called tough, because in this racket it's tough guys who lead the survivors."

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"..the power to make change happen is not in someone else’s hands, but yours" - You're Ok, Now Let's Make A Change

"..the power to make change happen is not in someone else’s hands, but yours" - You're Ok, Now Let's Make A Change | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
As a young couple in the 70’s, my parent’s library consisted of a closet bookshelf. I developed my love of reading by carefully studying...

Via Anne Leong
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

When we understand there are roles, there is a certain stablity that comes with it. It is not certainty but a sense of stablity in otherwise chaotic lives.

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Why all workplaces must take bullying seriously

Why all workplaces must take bullying seriously | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Accusations of bullying have engulfed the Miami Dolphins and the culture of football

Via george_reed
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Bullying happens because we allow it to happen and the main culprits are the management types. When we stand up we are told we are wrong. Bullying is no longer a physical proposition alone. It is cognitive, affective, and spiritual. It sucks us dry.

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What Makes Leaders Matter? Doing what Matters!

What Makes Leaders Matter? Doing what Matters! | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

"Leaders don’t matter until they do what matters. Intrinsic human worth and the value of a leader are separate issues. You don't matter when you do what doesn't matter. The more value you bring the more valuable you are..."


Via Allan Shaw, Lou Salza
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Leadership and followership are intertwined. They are about finding relational paths along the way .

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Allan Shaw's curator insight, November 13, 2013 1:46 AM

This commentary has a 'customer' focus and thus perhaps uses language a different than used often in schools. That said, much of the advice is useful, but difficult to put into practice.

Lou Salza's curator insight, November 15, 2013 10:48 AM

I liked this--pithy and potent.  Goethe once said someting like what matters most should never be at the mercy of what matters least or something like that. No where is leadership more necessary and more lacking than in a school that is failing its children. It is the seminal responsibility of the leadershipto help everyone in the operation get to the same place in terms of mission--then collaborate and cooperate in framing goals and aspirations and determining what and how data will be used to determine progress towards what matters most.  Execution follows commitment, clarity and communication.--Lou

 

Excerpt:

Doing more of what matters:

Identify your customer and the people you serve.Ask the people you serve if it matters. You think you know what matters but you don’t. You judge what matters by what matters to you. I asked one person what mattered to them and they said, “Public affirmation.”Stop doing what doesn’t matter. The need to be busy dilutes the worth of a leader. Ask yourself, “Would anyone notice if I stopped doing this?”Don’t do what others can do.Increase the time you spend with people. Lower the time you spend with computers and paper.Meet a need, the bigger the better.Focus. Rabbit chasing is fun but it makes you matter less.Prioritize time by spending more of it with a select few, 8 to 12. Who do you need to spend more time with?Instill confidence in others to the point that they take action without asking permission.Get stuff done. Every meeting that ends without action items makes you matter less.

Leaders matter more when they do more of what matters.

 
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The Science of Bullying | ED News Daily

The Science of Bullying | ED News Daily | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Guest article written by Dr. Susan Foster Faculty Member, M.Ed. in School Counseling at American Public University The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has classified bullying as a public health crisis.
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This is a good article.

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Mindfulness Does Not Equal Happiness

This is a big question, and one I was asked this week by a friend, and I thought I’d share my answer with you. Firstly let’s explore happiness and what most people think happiness is and how they feel happiness. In the modern day happiness is perceived as excitement, jumping up and down shouting “wooohoo” perhaps, or being out at a bar or club drinking and dancing and laughing with friends. When a person becomes excited a friend will often say, “why are you so happy”. And, if you aren’t smiling, a friend will often say, “why are you so miserable”. If you aren’t excited or displaying physicals signs of enjoyment it may be perceived that you aren’t happy. Happiness is therefore misperceived as a heightened state of mind, one where the mind is overly stimulated, adrenaline is rushing; a natural buzz if you like. If a person is happy in this state, does that mean they aren’t happy when not in this state? And what of introvert personalities, those who naturally don’t overtly display emotion, are they to be classified as not happy? Of course not, because this definition of happiness is wrong.


Via Susan Taylor, Bobby Dillard
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

No, it is not, but it might help us understand how to get through the ups and downs of life.

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Susan Taylor's curator insight, November 8, 2013 7:16 AM

Happiness is often confused with a hightened state of mind -- a "natural buzz", if you will.  So it makes sense that people could confuse mindfulness with happiness.

 

Those who practice mindfulness, however, understand happiness in a different way: a natural state of contentment and balance which comes from emotional stability.

 

Temporary ecstasy or a constant feeling of appreciating life -- which do you prefer?

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A Wonderful Graphic Featuring The Importance of Music in Education [Infographic]

A Wonderful Graphic Featuring The Importance of Music in Education [Infographic] | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

Via Gust MEES, Tom Perran, Audrey
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I found students enjoyed finding out what music I listen to. It did not mean they liked it, but it gave them insight that other things don't always.

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Audrey's curator insight, November 8, 2013 12:57 PM

I believe this is absolutely amazing!  This must be really great for those people whose preferred way to learn is through sound. Music is a very helpfu way to encourage learning. I have watched young children become captivated when they hear certain types of music.  At the Royal Festival Hall in London there are concerts with classical music specifically aimed at pre-school youngsters and above.  The growth in their neurons must be incredible!!!  Written by Audrey Foster for curated content at www.homeschoolsource.co.uk

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Why staying calm is important

Why staying calm is important | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
 As a new employee, relatively fresh out of college and working at a Fortune 100 company, I had some preconceived notions about how people would behave in a

Via Anne Leong
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

It is interesting to find out what you missed when you got rattled.

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Overcome 4 Massive Motivation Killers

Overcome 4 Massive Motivation Killers | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
These 4 productivity and happiness assassins can work together in an effort to sap our motivation and kill our momentum, but we don't have to let them win.

Via Anne Egros
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

We need to have purpose in our lives and work.

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Anne Egros's curator insight, October 24, 2013 12:15 PM

Better to do something imperfectly than to do nothing flawlessly.” ~Robert H. Schuller

Catherine Macquart-Martin's curator insight, October 25, 2013 3:59 AM

A useful second shot ;-)

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decisive-dozen-research-v1.2.pdf

For decades, the workplace learning-and-performance field has found itself swamped with fads and misconceptions that harm learners and depress learning results. One of the most important sources of improvement is research. Unfortunately, research on learning is tucked away in academic journals that are essentially indecipherable to most practitioners. For research to be useful, it must be translated into clear, concise, and potent recommendations. Instead of focusing on hundreds or thousands of recommendations, practitioners need a short list of key factors to target for improvement. After 15 years of research, a dozen learning factors have been uncovered that—if implemented—can improve learning results dramatically. These “Decisive Dozen” will be detailed in a forthcoming book. This paper shares an abridged version of the research support.

 


Via Lynnette Van Dyke
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

It will be interesting to see the book.

 

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Leading Beyond the Status Quo – Are you a better leader than a 7th Grader?

Leading Beyond the Status Quo – Are you a better leader than a 7th Grader? | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

Via AlGonzalezinfo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This is an interesting post.

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AlGonzalezinfo's curator insight, October 21, 2013 6:29 PM

Do you follow an inclusive and peaceful process that helps you resolve conflict with others?

 

Can you have a meaningful exchange with others who have hurt you without blaming them?

 

If the answer to those questions is no, there may be a few 12 year olds that can lead through conflict better than you.

 

This week, Kate Salmon, a Montesorri teacher at the Elizabeth Ann Clune school of Ithaca, NY, shares the Peace Treaty model, a feedback process that enables children to lead through difficult conflict in a respectful and peaceful manner, without blaming or judging the other person.

 

The Peace Treaty is definitely an example of the benefits of direct and inclusive feedback, very different from what many of us experience at work.

 

To access the podcast, go to:  http://bit.ly/17Ffvig

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How to Know If You're Working (and Living) With Purpose

How to Know If You're Working (and Living) With Purpose | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Who doesn't want a deeper sense of purpose? Ask these four questions to discover your path to more meaningful work.

Via Anne Leong, Wise Leader™, Ricard Lloria, David Hain
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Life does have a way of showing us what holds meaning for us.

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John Michel's curator insight, October 20, 2013 11:52 AM

Regardless of your neurological wiring, when you're living with purpose you should be feeling one of these two ways--excitement or satisfaction--most of the time. Your moments of exhilaration, curiosity, and contentment should far outnumber your moments of boredom, frustration, or despair.

David Hain's curator insight, October 21, 2013 12:19 PM

Four great questions here - but the health warning is that they are easy to state, difficult to answer and even harder to put into practice.

Starts with asking them though...

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Howard Gardner: ‘Multiple intelligences’ are not ‘learning styles’ - Washington Post

Howard Gardner: ‘Multiple intelligences’ are not ‘learning styles’ - Washington Post | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
The famed psychologist explains why one is not the other though they are often confused.

Via John Evans, Mary Perfitt-Nelson
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Makes good clarification points.

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Tom Hood's curator insight, October 19, 2013 11:35 AM

I am a fan of Gardner and his Five MInds for the Future. This new work is needed and I like the emphasis on designing learning to work with these multiple intelligences. In this world of rapid change and increasing complexity, learning is THE competitive advantage we can control. 

Ante Lauc's curator insight, October 21, 2013 3:39 AM

For me the most important is moral and emotional intelligence, than cognitive and other that HG did discover.

Rhiannon Boyd's curator insight, November 18, 2013 8:33 PM

From the article: 

 "On the basis of research in several disciplines, including the study of how human capacities are represented in the brain, I developed the idea that each of us has a number of relatively independent mental faculties, which can be termed our “multiple intelligences.” The basic idea is simplicity itself. A belief in a single intelligence assumes that we have one central, all-purpose computer—and it determines how well we perform in every sector of life. In contrast, a belief in multiple intelligences assumes that we have a number of relatively autonomous computers—one that computes linguistic information, another spatial information, another musical information, another information about other people, and so on." - HG

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What saying 'I' says about you

What saying 'I' says about you | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Researchers say that your usage of the pronoun 'I' says more about you than you may realize.

Via Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I wonder what it means when the person who overuses "I" has no real authority based on experience?

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Sharrock's curator insight, October 10, 2013 10:39 AM

One interesting statement: "Avoiding the first-person pronoun is distancing." I would be interested in the book "The Secret Life of Pronouns" just to find out why people refer to themselves in the third person (techically, using one's name when talking about oneself is not often using a pronoun, but maybe cognitively, it is.