Education, Curiosity, and Happiness
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Education, Curiosity, and Happiness
What roles can curiosity and happiness play in learning?
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Schoolchildren are more alert and have quicker reaction times in the afternoon

Schoolchildren are more alert and have quicker reaction times in the afternoon | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Children aged nine to 11 reported feeling less sleepy in the afternoon, contradicting current thinking, finds University of Oxford and BBC study
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
There has been research evidence for some time that school begins to early in the day. The lack of impetus to change is rooted in logistics, transportation, and traditions that are hard to shake. It might be that it is easier to refocus what we teach in the morning and afternoon, based on data. This is where good data can inform good teaching.
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20 Classic Poems Every Man Should Read | The Art of Manliness

20 Classic Poems Every Man Should Read | The Art of Manliness | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Editor’s note: This article was written through a collaboration between C. Daniel Motley and the AoM Team.  Matthew Arnold, a Victorian poet, once claimed, “The crown of literature is poetry,” and if our neglect of poetry is any indication, the crown is rusting. While books sales fluctuate from year to year, fewer and fewer publishing houses are …
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I love poetry. Poetry was a cornerstone of my teaching.

The shortcoming of all these poems are they were written by males, largely white males. I can make a case for poems by Mary Oliver, George Eliot, Maya Angelou, Alice Walker, etc.
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Who Owns the Learning in Your Classroom?

Who Owns the Learning in Your Classroom? | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
It took me years to transform my instruction toward a more student-centered approach. This is my story where I share my journey toward student ownership through student choice.    Listen to the Podcast Just click on the audio
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Teachers are responsible for teaching; each student for their learning. This means teaching is relational and conversational; therefore not easy.
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Critical and Alternative Perspectives on Student Engagement | Student Affairs and Technology

Critical and Alternative Perspectives on Student Engagement | Student Affairs and Technology | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Provocative excerpts from the Higher Education Policy journal
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
In the editorial article about the over all report, the authors point out "student engagement is a contentious term." I don't understand this as a problem. Being contentious keeps the door open to more questions and conversations.
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Get the Most Out of Summer

Get the Most Out of Summer | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Eight tips on incorporating relaxation and intentional planning for the year ahead into your summer so you can return to school refreshed.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Teachers need to take a break. Yes, summer can offer time to plan ahead for next year. The break is designed to recharge one's energies. The planning should be intentional.

Keep a journal is a great idea.
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Today, Kids Need To Learn More Than Facts, But To Solve Problems And Innovate

we need to shift from an educational system that values what you can answer to one that values what you can ask and that fosters skills like teamwork, communication and exploration.

Via Kelly Christopherson
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
John Dewey's philosophy of education and teaching is essential in today's day and age. When presented with problems to solve and engage with actively, humans want to solve them. This has to be done mindfully and thoughtfully.

Following in Dewey, I contend that mind is a verb in teaching. Teaching is minding and attending to the learning of students like a good gardner does with their garden. It is a caring for children and learning.
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Kelly Christopherson's curator insight, June 9, 11:06 AM
There is definitely a need to shift what happens in schools and classrooms to focus on collaboration and solving problems. 

"we need to shift from an educational system that values what you can answer to one that values what you can ask and that fosters skills like teamwork, communication and exploration." 

As AI and other automation takes place, schools need to shift from a focus on tests and examinations to work that is develop problem-solving and collaboration. Implementing Design Thinking and Universal Design in classroom planning and development shifts the focus away from separating skills into subjects with little connectivity. The world is connected through various networks while schools continue to impose an artificial separation of subjects. 
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TEACHER VOICE: When Hurricane Matthew hit my community hard, these tests kept my eighth graders from losing more ground - The Hechinger Report

TEACHER VOICE: When Hurricane Matthew hit my community hard, these tests kept my eighth graders from losing more ground - The Hechinger Report | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
The end of the school year is a busy time, filled with field trips, final projects, and, of course, spring testing. While student testing often receives negative attention, my colleagues and I take an alternate view on it. That’s why when there was a question about eliminating the spring Measures of Academic Progress, or MAP, …
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The other day I read the first section of a scooped article. The author referred to "data driven teaching as the stupidest thing" he had heard of and claimed teaching is "child-driven." In my writing, I have argued that the subject is what informs teaching.

It is not one thing that informs (not drives) teaching. It is many things: the stories our students tell us about themselves acts as subjective data. That is exceptionally complex in and of itself.

Hannah Arendt cautioned leaving children to their own devices in their learning, suggesting is was negligence. Teaching is relational and includes data of many forms to inform what that means.
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In a Fake Fact Era, Schools Teach the ABCs of News Literacy

In a Fake Fact Era, Schools Teach the ABCs of News Literacy | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Schools across the country are educating students in how to sift through today's online avalanche of alternative facts.

Via Bonnie Bracey Sutton
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
This is essential in teaching and learning.
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Nancy Jones's curator insight, June 12, 9:59 AM
There are some interesting approaches to address the issue of media literacy in the classroom as well as some tools to help
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, June 12, 12:56 PM
This is not a new problem. It is an amplified problem with the speed of information moving on social media and the Internet.
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Learning My Place in This World

Content and resources for the education researcher
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
My research was based on how teachers experience becoming who they are as teachers. I employed hermeneutic phenomenology in the interviews. What stood out was how often each teacher turned to their autobiography to describe how they experienced teaching and becoming a teacher.

Who we are is essential to who we are as a teacher. Parker Palmer suggested "who the self is that teaches" is the least asked question. Instead we turn to more technical questions.

The currere method is a direction I intend to explore more fully and overlap my research.
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3 Powerful Questions To Start and End Your Day

3 Powerful Questions To Start and End Your Day | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Your questions determine the quality of your answers. Powerful questions will get you a lot farther than quick answers.

Via donhornsby, Bobby Dillard
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
What is essential in these questions is they are open-ended. In Gadamerian terms they are eloquent without fixed answers and open up paths to new questions.
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donhornsby's curator insight, April 14, 2015 9:21 AM

(From the article): Try these questions, see how they work, and find the questions that work best for you. Consider open-ended questions, rather than questions that have only one right answer or that can be answered with a simple “yes” or “no.” The most powerful questions are those that expand your thinking.

John Michel's curator insight, April 14, 2015 10:50 PM

Try these questions, see how they work, and find the questions that work best for you. Consider open-ended questions, rather than questions that have only one right answer or that can be answered with a simple “yes” or “no.” The most powerful questions are those that expand your thinking.

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Let Knowledge Become Experimental: on transfer and innovation in education

Let Knowledge Become Experimental: on transfer and innovation in education | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
"We tend to think of it [knowledge] after the model of a spectator viewing a finished picture rather than after that of the artist producing the painting." John Dewey

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Problem solving and critical thinking are essential skills in teaching and learning. Dewey's quote is right on. When we learn and teach, it is not as spectators. We are active participants performing in ways that respond to problems we are trying to solve and re-solve. David Bohm wrote that paradox is the way to think about what we call problems. As Parker Palmer puts it, there is a continuing tension in paradox.
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queenterminal's comment, June 9, 5:55 AM
Amazing
Gérard Borreill's curator insight, June 9, 6:11 AM
Et si on repensait l'enseignement pour favoriser l'innovation ?
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The curriculum as contested space

Keynote on 6 June 2017 @ the 7th Teaching & Learning Conference Theme: Going Places: Let’s Invent the Future Hosted by North-West University, Vanderbijlpark, …

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Curriculum is a contested space based on its etymology, coming from the Latin currere. Currere is the infinitive meaning to run a course and has an autobiographical connotation. It also uses the gerund running and suggests running the course of one's life.

John Dewey pointed us in that direction and Pinar, Grumet, Aoki, etc. have been writing on the method of currere as a curriculum theory for almost 45 years. The method is grounded in phenomenology and pyscho-analysis. For me, heremeneutics, particularly Paul Ricoeur's critical hermeneutics and Judith Butler's work in performativity, which is grounded in hermeneutics plays a role in my understanding.
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Why Teacher Education Should Include Neuroscience

Why Teacher Education Should Include Neuroscience | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
The neuroscience of how the brain learns and what influences the most successful brain acquisition and application of learning should be included in all teacher education programs.

Teachers need to be prepared with foundational knowledge to understand, evaluate, and apply the neuroscience of learning. With this knowledge they will be able to recognize future implications from this rapidly expanding field of research to increase the effectiveness of their teaching and build and sustain students’ joy of learning.

Via John Evans, Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
When I was completing my Master's degree, I was fortunate to take a course on neuroscience and teaching. It was insightful. Another great source for me was parents with children who were diagnosed with autism, fetal acohol syndrome, ADD/ADHD, etc. They provided information I did not have access to.
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MFaculty's curator insight, June 9, 10:00 AM
This is incredibly relevant for today's educators across levels and disciplines. 
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Elite or Selective?: Reconsidering Who We Educate and How

Elite or Selective?: Reconsidering Who We Educate and How | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Sharde Miller’s California teen describes his road from Compton to Harvard University offers a powerful subtext about the American Dream as well as the enduring belief in education as the “great…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Paul Gorman echoes Mike Rose's work in "Why School?" The challenge goes beyond higher education with charter schools, magnet schools, private schools, and academies in K-12. This is not just an American issue. It is more universal with an oppressive neo-liberal subtext.
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What If Almost Everything We Thought About The Teaching Of Writing Was Wrong?

What If Almost Everything We Thought About The Teaching Of Writing Was Wrong? | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Why Do We Write? Language merely reflects our way of trying to make sense of the world. - Frank Smith Frank Smith (1982) says 'writing touches every part of our lives'. One of the first reasons we write is because it is a tool for communication in culture. It gives us the ability to share…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
There is a Paulo Freire quality to the suggestions.
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Letter Grades Deserve An 'F': A Recommendation For Updating School Report Cards

Letter Grades Deserve An 'F': A Recommendation For Updating School Report Cards | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
The truth is that traditional report cards rarely provide accurate assessments of student learning, writes Mike Kalin.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I used rubrics extensively. They travel well in project based and problem based learning, which are often trans-disciplinary. As a teacher, I wanted to be able to describe in a narrative manner where students had come from, were, and could go in their learning. I taught in schools where administrators lacked the vision to let teachers do that.
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Your Pedagogy Might be More Aligned with Colonialism than You Realize

Your Pedagogy Might be More Aligned with Colonialism than You Realize | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
My 19-year old self sat on a panel for a room full of High School Seniors who eagerly sought insight about their transition to college, when a woman in the room cut me off mid-sentence to exclaim…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
We cut off students frequently and correct them. I encouraged students to express their understanding of learning in whatever way was most comfortable for them i.e. poetry, orally, images, etc. It is their learning and they have to assume responsibility for it. By allowing them opportunities to express themselves, they take responsibility for their learning.

It was intriguing how the method of currere was used in the article.
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What Teachers Really Want From Their Administrators

What Teachers Really Want From Their Administrators | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Ask any teacher why they chose a career in education, and chances are they will tell you that they have a passion for making a difference in students’ lives, and that they want to help their students learn, grow, and develop so they can be successful. You’re probably never going to hear a teacher say that they went into teaching because they wanted to attend meetings, coordinate an endless number of initiatives, and navigate administrative burdens and “office politics.” Yet all too often in the modern educational environment, a disconnect between teachers and administrators takes hold, creating frustration, discontent, and …
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
There are good points here: model expected behaviour, encourage teachers to teach and plan together, allow teachers a voice in their education, etc.

I changed the wording somewhat. Collaborate means something different than working together. Empowering is not the same as engaging. All in all, this is a good article.
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Why for-profit charter schools are going out of style with some education reform leaders

Why for-profit charter schools are going out of style with some education reform leaders | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Charter advocates were always a “strange bedfellows” coalition. Now, their union is splintering.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Charter schools are only the tip of the iceberg. What corporations and thinly veiled foundations are doing below the surface is perhaps more problematic.

As well, the idea of academies within public schools, a big thing in Alberta schools, is a way to segregate with a veneer of accetablity attached to it. Hannah Arendt and Gert Biesta argue for schools that acknowledge radical plurality. Privatization and other forms of exclusion deny each community a voice in their schools.
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How To Apply The Brain Science Of Resilience To The Classroom

How To Apply The Brain Science Of Resilience To The Classroom | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
A nonprofit called Turnaround for Children helps schools meet the needs of children facing poverty and adversity.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I discovered I did not know much about what happened in my students lives outside of school. This was despite wanting to understand as much as I can. How do adverse childhood experiences affect a child/youth, their learning, social interactions, etc? How can we, as teachers and adults, help them form resiliency and learn despite these experiences?

One teacher I interviewed told her students they could teach her about the unspeakable abuse they had experienced. She did not force the conversation and let it emerge as it would.
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Teacher residencies: A foundation for teacher retention? | CTQ #CTQCollab

Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The author proposed something similar to nursing and doctor residencies that would team an inexperienced teacher with a mentor and learn in a cohort setting.
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Learn-gevity: Enhancing your ability to learn, perform and succeed over time

“Wisdom is not a product of schooling but of the lifelong learning attempt to acquire it.” ~ Albert Einstein Lifelong learning has long been understood to be a critical success factor. But today, it’s taken on even greater importance.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The short article has some good ideas about how to stay relevant: be aware of your discomfort zone, cultivante curiousity in yourself and encourage in others around you, shine a light on the insignificant, etc.

The last point in my list is interesting. Frequently, we overlook small details. Yes, it is easy to get lost in the granular, but do not take it for granted.
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Education Readings June 9th

Education Readings June 9th | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
By Allan Alach I welcome suggested articles, so if you come across a gem, email it to me at allanalach@inspire.net.nz Finland Will Become The First Country In The World To Get Rid Of All School Subjects Thanks to Phil Cullen: ‘How many times have you wondered if you were going to need subjects you were…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The two links that stood out right away were the one about John Dewey's Experience and Education. As noted in the article, Dewey's work have been lost in a system focused on conformity and standardization, battling over binary issues as if there are no intermediate ways to think.

The other link that caught my eye was mindfulness in middle school. I do not subscribe to mindfulness as a technique. It is a way of being that takes time and effort to integrate. As Shenryu Suzuki suggested it requires continuous practice.
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What’s Lost as Handwriting Fades

What’s Lost as Handwriting Fades | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

New evidence suggests that the links between handwriting and broader educational development run deep.


Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge, Martin Debattista
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Actually, handwriting does matter, but not in the most direct way, producing. There is evidence that handwriting helps develop the creative side of the brain.

From a phenomenological perspective, writing also produces text to be re-interpreted continuously over time. Certainly, digital tools can do the same, but is it the same?
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Hey Higher Ed, Why Not Focus On Teaching?

Hey Higher Ed, Why Not Focus On Teaching? | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

Stanford physics and education professor Carl Wieman won a Nobel Prize for his innovative, break-through work in quantum mechanics. Wieman has since levered the prestige and power of that prize to call attention to the need to transform undergraduate teaching, especially science education. 


Wieman's message, as we've reported here and here, is bold: Too many undergraduate programs fail to focus on teaching effectiveness or even bother to try to measure it. As he sees it, undergraduate Higher Ed still worships at the old false idol called the Big Lecture and doesn't seem to want to ask whether it's working.

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Via Rosemary Tyrrell, Ed.D., juandoming
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Having teachers teach at the university level is essential for undergraduates to learn.
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Rosemary Tyrrell, Ed.D.'s curator insight, June 8, 11:19 AM
Great interview. Well worth a read or listen.