Education, Curiosity, and Happiness
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Metacognition | Center for Teaching | Vanderbilt University

Metacognition | Center for Teaching | Vanderbilt University | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

"Metacognition is, put simply, thinking about one’s thinking.  More precisely, it refers to the processes used to plan, monitor, and assess one’s understanding and performance. Metacognition includes a critical awareness of a) one’s thinking and learning and b) oneself as a thinker and learner."


Via Beth Dichter, Nancy Jones
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

Learning about our learning is essential and helps us understand how to move the learning into new areas. It includes pedagogy which helps students find new pathways that are never the same one time to the next and is never the same for all students. Teaching and learning explore who we are and how not just what we learn and how we learn.

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niftyjock's curator insight, July 28, 2014 6:26 PM

Being a man, I'm very poor at reflection, but by breaking it into metacognitive practices helped me think about my thinking. 

David Baker's curator insight, July 29, 2014 6:13 PM
The recommendations for developing a “classroom culture grounded in metacognition” are great teaching insights and this serves as a powerful link to the research. The following excerpt is one nugget."Giving Students License to Identify Confusions within the Classroom Culture:  ask students what they find confusing, acknowledge the difficultiesIntegrating Reflection into Credited Course Work: integrate short reflection (oral or written) that ask students what they found challenging or what questions arose during an assignment/exam/projectMetacognitive Modeling by the Instructor for Students: model the thinking processes involved in your field and sought in your course by being explicit about “how you start, how you decide what to do first and then next, how you check your work, how you know when you are done” (p. 118)

To facilitate these activities, she also offers three useful tables:

Questions for students to ask themselves as they plan, monitor, and evaluate their thinking within four learning contexts—in class, assignments, quizzes/exams, and the course as a whole (p. 115)Prompts for integrating metacognition into discussions of pairs during clicker activities, assignments, and quiz or exam preparation (p. 117)Question"
Ness Crouch's curator insight, April 7, 2015 1:19 AM

Metacognition is one of the hardest aspects of student's learning to get from them. Children find it difficult to communicate about their thinking and teacher's find it difficult to teach these skills. This is well worth a read to help develop our own understanding of metacognition. 

Education, Curiosity, and Happiness
What roles can curiosity and happiness play in learning?
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Increase the meaningfulness of your work by considering how it helps others

Increase the meaningfulness of your work by considering how it helps others | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

When we find our work meaningful and worthwhile, we are more likely to enjoy it, to be more productive, and feel committed to our employers and satisfied with our jobs. For obvious reasons, then, work psychologists have been trying to find out what factors contribute to people finding more meaning in their work.

 

Top of the list is what they call “task significance”, which in plain English means believing that the work you do is of benefit to others. However, to date, most of the evidence for the importance of task significance has been correlational – workers who see how their work is beneficial to others are more likely to find it meaningful, but that doesn’t mean that task significance is causing the feelings of meaningfulness.

 

Now Blake Allan at Purdue University has provided some of the first longitudinal evidence that seeing our work as benefiting others really does lead to an increase in our finding it meaningful. “These results are important both for the wellbeing of individual workers and as a potential avenue to increase productivity,” he concludes in the Journal of Vocational Behaviour.


Via The Learning Factor
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
To me teaching is a vocation that calls on a person to make a difference and help others. It brings meaning and is worthwhile.
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, September 24, 7:40 PM

You will be happier and more productive in your work if you find it meaningful. 

CCM Consultancy's curator insight, Today, 1:10 AM

Perceiving one’s work as improving the welfare of others leads to the perception that it is personally meaningful, and valuable. Employers might assist by helping them make contact with the people who benefit from their work, by increasing the influence of their work on others, or “creating a prosocial climate in the workplace".

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The Abuses of History

The Abuses of History | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Historians, like journalists, are in the business of manipulating facts. Some use facts to tell truths, however unpleasant. But many more omit, highlight and at times distort them in ways that sustain national myths and buttress dominant narratives. The failure by most of the United States’ popular historians and the press to tell stories of oppression and the struggles against it, especially by women, people of color, the working class and the poor, has contributed to the sickening triumphalism and chauvinism that are poisoning our society. The historian James W. Loewen, in his book “Lies Across America: What Our Historic Markers and Monuments Get Wrong,” calls the monuments that celebrate our highly selective and distorted history a “landscape of denial.”

The historian Carl Becker wrote, “History is what the present chooses to remember about the past.” And as a nation founded on the pillars of genocide, slavery, patriarchy, violent repression of popular movements, savage war crimes committed to expand the empire, and capitalist exploitation, we choose to remember very little. This historical amnesia, as James Baldwin never tired of pointing out, is very dangerous. It feeds self-delusion. It severs us from recognition of our propensity for violence. It sees us project on others—almost always the vulnerable—the unacknowledged evil that lies in our past and our hearts. It shuts down the voices of the oppressed, those who can tell us who we are and enable us through self-reflection and self-criticism to become a better people. “History does not merely refer to the past … history is literally present in all we do,” Baldwin wrote.

Via iPamba
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Teaching is about conversations that are complicated by what we privilege and do not privilege in our society. William Pinar, in What is Curriculum Theory? (2nd Edition), provides currere is a way to have those conversations, cautioning teachers that currere is not a technique.
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Ikigai: A Japanese concept to improve work and life

Ikigai: A Japanese concept to improve work and life | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
With no direct English translation, it’s a term that embodies the idea of happiness in living. Yukari Mitsuhashi explains.

Via Bobby Dillard
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Teaching and the people in my life are the reason I get up each morning. It was/is my Ikigai
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In Short: School Culture – The Synapse – Medium

In Short: School Culture – The Synapse – Medium | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
The email request and ambition were sincere. But. Then. “In Short: School Culture” is published by Mike Crowley in The Synapse
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
This is a short and very powerful piece. There is no formula to forming school culture. It takes time, patience, communication, etc.
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These countries come top for education | #OECD 2016

These countries come top for education | #OECD 2016 | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
The OECD has examined the performance of education systems around the world. How does your country compare?

 

 


Via Gust MEES, Yashy Tohsaku
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Engaging and educating parents is essential for success. I am not sure I want OECD using their measures, but it does not mean parents do not play an essential role.
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Thomas Moore's curator insight, Today, 6:05 AM

Intersesting

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Divergent thinking

Divergent thinking | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Divergent thinking is essential for creativity. It is the ability to see lots of possible ways to interpret a question and lots of possible answers to it.

It is a thought process used to generate creative ideas by exploring many possibilities. Instead of taking obvious steps and walking alon

Via Nuit Alchemy of Love, Mindfulness Love, De Ge
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
One of the essential elements of divergent thinking is meditating, exploring, and reflecting on what we learn. This should include adults.
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Nuit Alchemy of Love's curator insight, December 20, 2016 9:22 AM
Divergent Thinking Article in Times by Natasa Pantovic Nuit (Author of 7 Mindfulness Books). 'For Divergent Thinking to happen the classroom environment has to be a safe place for students to experiment, make mistakes and take risks. The environment has to be safe to fail, revise and try again...'
De Ge's curator insight, September 23, 10:28 AM
Divergent thinking, from Conscious Parenting book
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5 Questions to Ask Yourself About Your Unmotivated Students

5 Questions to Ask Yourself About Your Unmotivated Students | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
If we know what works to motivate students, why are so many students still unmotivated? These five questions will help you determine if your practice is really

Via Grant Montgomery, Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The five questions focus on our relationships with students.
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Experience and Education -John Dewey 1938

Experience and Education -John Dewey 1938 | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Such a lot of the ideas expressed today have their genesis in the ideas of John Dewey .That Dewey's ideas have yet to be fully realise
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I found this quote part way through the article about John Dewey's excellent book: Experience and Education. It summarizes his thinking about teaching and learning. Dewey was opposed to the binary either/or thinking that dominated, and continues to dominate school. It is as if there is only one right answer and all the others are wrong. How did we get this far with that thinking?

"It is at this point the either-or philosophy becomes pertinent.Dewey believed there needed to be an intimate relationship between experience and education and that students had to construct their own learning.

It does not follow however that the knowledge and skill of the mature person has no direct value nor the knowledge that is contained in traditional subjects. Early progressive schools made little use of organised subject matter nor any form of direction and guidance. This, Dewey believed, was too much of a reaction against the sterility of traditional teaching. Too much emphasis was placed on freedom for its own sake and neglected the role of the teacher."
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When Leaders Lead Their Schools Like Ben Zander Conducts Symphonies

When Leaders Lead Their Schools Like Ben Zander Conducts Symphonies | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
We need leaders, like conductors, who lead by empowering those s/he leads.

Via Dr. Deborah Brennan
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Peter Senge, Ted Aoki and others have described leading and teaching as improvising like jazz musicians.
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How to Engage Underperforming Students

How to Engage Underperforming Students | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Guided by research, educators at Cochrane Collegiate have homed in on ten top teaching methods, and teachers receive weekly PD to help them implement the practices.

Via Stephania Savva, Ph.D
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Rather than student-centred, I focus on subject-centred. The word subject has three meanings: topic, human, and the verb. When we think of teaching and learning as subject centred, we focus on questions about what engages students. We can ask questions that frame dialogue without presupposed answers. How has each student and teacher experienced this subject in their lives?
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Losing out on learning: Action to ensure refugee children get an education

Losing out on learning: Action to ensure refugee children get an education | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
By Joseph Nhan-O’Reilly, Head of Education Policy & Advocacy and Sébastien Hine, Education Research Adviser at Save the Children The world is now witnessing the highest levels of displacement on record. According to UNHCR, an unprecedented 65.6 million people around the world have been forced from their homes. Among them are nearly 22.5 million refugees,…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
We need to understand living in refugees camps is dangerous and school is not always available. Many refugee families want their children in school and value a formal education.
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Education Readings September 22nd

Education Readings September 22nd | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
By Allan Alach I welcome suggested articles, so if you come across a gem, email it to me at allanalach@inspire.net.nz Don’t Say “Times” When Teaching Multiplication (And What to Say Instead) ‘Choosing our words carefully can have a big impact on student understanding, especially when it comes to multiplication. Make this small change to your…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
There are links to articles by Henry Giroux, Alfie Cohen, and one about John Dewey.
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5 surprising lessons I learned from Buddhist nuns about dating and relationships

5 surprising lessons I learned from Buddhist nuns about dating and relationships | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
I spent two weeks at Plum village, a Buddhist monastery in France. I came to recover from burn out, and what I found was not only wisdom and practice around how to be present with life, but also…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I would take the five lessons one step further. Apply the lessons to thing in our lives i.e. teaching. Why do we teach or do any job? If we love something or someone, take time and savour the love.
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How to Make Every Grade More Like Kindergarten

How to Make Every Grade More Like Kindergarten | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
In his new book, MIT professor Mitchel Resnick lays out a vision for encouraging creative thinking, based on his research into what he calls Lifelong Kindergarten.
Via Vicki Moro
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The Kindergarten teacher I interviewed for my dissertation felt we move away from play, which is serious for children and adults. Mitch Resnick's ideas echo John Dewey.
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Why Students Forget—and What You Can Do About It by Youki Terada

Why Students Forget—and What You Can Do About It by Youki Terada | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

Our brains are wired to forget, but there are research-backed strategies you can use to make your teaching stick.


Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Ines Bieler, Bobby Dillard
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Our brains our wired to forget. One of the strategies to help students with memory is to allow them to have conversations with peers. This was recommended by Sam Intrator. I found it useful in my classroom.
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Thomas Moore's curator insight, Today, 6:07 AM

I'll never forget the day I remembered

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James Baldwin On Teaching

James Baldwin On Teaching | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Former high school teacher Clint Smith has a a good – and short – essay in The New Yorker today headlined James Baldwin’s Lesson for Teachers in a Time of Turmoil. He talks about Baldwi…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
There are several links (one to the essay), a quote, and video. This is a worthwhile read and view in this time of turmoil.
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The Very Seriously Humorless Education of Students

The Very Seriously Humorless Education of Students | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
I am a junior in college during the early 1980s, sitting attentively in Dr. Richard Predmore's upper-level English course; I am an English education major, and the sort of mama's-boy-student-suck-up that professors appreciated and fellow students wanted to throat punch. Per the syllabus (a code I cracked with some embarrassment as a first-year student), we…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
"Students have spent most of their formal education being incredibly serious about incredibly serious texts and topics, thus, we must help them over this hump."

Teachers who enjoy teaching and convey this can help students get over the hump.
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The key to keeping employees engaged? Managers

The key to keeping employees engaged? Managers | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Successfully improving employee engagement in the workplace is a pressing challenge for managers. At the recent Gallup event “The Competitive Advantage of Engaging Your Employees,” consultant Darryl Gole shared that 85% of global employees are not engaged at work, a figure that hasn’t changed significantly since 2000. Moreover, disengaged employees are costing the US between $483 and $605 billion a year.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
School administrators are often relegated to being managers rather than leaders. To engage people is to lead them and communicate with them. Good leaders understand they will retain teachers if they engage them, allow for agency, and provide space for teachers to have voice.
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James Baldwin’s Lesson for Teachers in a Time of Turmoil

James Baldwin’s Lesson for Teachers in a Time of Turmoil | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Clint Smith on James Baldwin’s “A Talk to Teachers” and the relevant lessons it offers teachers in our current political climate.

Via iPamba
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I had not read this essay. When I saw the post, I downloaded it. James Baldwin offers us a window into what it means to not be privileged in a mythical narrative that suggests everyone is.
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Why Books Will Always Matter - The Scholarly Kitchen

Why Books Will Always Matter - The Scholarly Kitchen | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
An inspirational talk by the National Book Foundation's Lisa Lucas.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
This is an excellent video explaining why books are essential to humans. They help us learn empathy.
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Educational readings:Time to return to the democratic vision of John Dewey and creative teaching

Educational readings:Time to return to the democratic vision of John Dewey  and creative teaching | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Whatever happens in the New Zealand Elections Jacinda Adern has made us proud  to be Labour. Education Readings By Alla
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The article about only 2 hours of science per week is interesting. In multi-disciplinary classrooms, one can reach over topics and teach about science in Social Studies and LA. That is what I did, even in junior high.
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Teachers Are Quitting Because They're Dissatisfied

Teachers Are Quitting Because They're Dissatisfied | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Teacher turnover hurts student achievement, is expensive for schools and districts, and leads to teacher shortages, Darling-Hammond said. 

And both teachers who leave the profession and teachers who change schools are most commonly leaving because they are dissatisfied, according to the analysis. See the below graph breaking down why teachers left the profession in 2012-13. (Percentages do not add up to 100 since teachers were allowed to select more than one reason.)

Via Mel Riddile, Les Howard, Mary Perfitt-Nelson
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I think this is one of the underlying issues in why teachers leave. Teacher agency and voice are silenced. Teachers are the closest to their students, but, often, are excluded from the conversations that are essential to their students.

I experienced working for (not with) administrators who had not been in the classroom for years and others who fled the classroom after only a few years. Too often, the joy I found in teaching was squelched by the oppression I experienced.
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How Showing and Telling Kids ‘I Believe in You’ Can Empower (Engage) Them at School

The types of messages students receive can make a difference in how eager they are to learn subjects like math.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Engage is a better word than empower. To empower is to give power. To engage is to enter into a conversation. Teaching is a deeply relational practice.
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Time for a rebirth of the creative spirit.

Time for a rebirth of the creative spirit. | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
  The time is right for a true educational revolution! We need to listen to lost voices and rediscover our own. Who wants to join th
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The basic message in the article is how we have a limited memory of what works in schools.
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Examining Links Between Academic Performance And Food Stamps

Examining Links Between Academic Performance And Food Stamps | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
South Carolina researchers have drawn a connection between low-income students' poor performance on math tests and the time of month when their families run low on food stamps.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Good research is premised on a hypothesis and a best guess. My best guess would be classroom teachers understand poverty and hunger limit learning.
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