Education, Curiosity, and Happiness
1.3K views | +0 today
Follow
 
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Cultural Trendz
onto Education, Curiosity, and Happiness
Scoop.it!

17 things emotionally strong people don’t do

17 things emotionally strong people don’t do | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

Once you believe you are strong emotionally, you will unconsciously act stronger than before and begin to take control over your emotional whims. – Senora Roy

Life is a series of stories, and each one of us has a unique story to tell. Billions upon billions of stories and no two are exactly the same. If the story of your life has been filled with more sad moments than happy ones, it’s time to change that. And the best place to start is within your head.

You have the power to create the life you want. One crucial skill that will help you get there is learning how to become emotionally strong. The good news is emotional strength is like a muscle: the more you use it, the stronger it becomes.

In this article, you’ll learn 17 things emotionally strong people don’t do … so you can start creating the existence you’ve always imagined for yourself.


They don’t beg for attention.

Emotional strength means confidence, and confident people don’t need to constantly be the center of attention. They’re comfortable in their own skin.


They don’t allow others to bring them down.

Emotionally strong people ignore the haters and the naysayers. They weed these people out and surround themselves with positive people instead.

 

They don’t stop believing in themselves.

    Somehow I can’t believe that there are any heights that can’t be scaled by a man who knows the secrets of making dreams come true. This special secret, it seems to me, can be summarized in four C’s. They are curiosity, confidence, courage, and constancy, and the greatest of all is confidence. When you believe in a thing, believe in it all the way, implicitly and unquestionable.  – Walt Disney

Soak up these amazing words from Walt Disney. Because belief is the most essential quality of emotional strength.

 

They’re not afraid to love.

    Love is the force that transforms and improves the Soul of the World.  – Paulo Coelho

People who possess emotional strength have experienced heartbreak. But it doesn’t hold them back … it makes them stronger. Just because you’ve been hurt doesn’t mean you should shut love out of your life. Open up your heart and embrace vulnerability. The love you find will be worth everything you go through to get it.

 

They’re not afraid of slowing down.

Sometimes you need to take a step back and slow it down when you’ve been pushing yourself too hard. Having drive is great but not at the expense of your health and well-being. Allow yourself time for reflection and relaxation.


They refuse to be a victim of circumstance.

Being emotionally strong means refusing to make excuses. Leave the past behind you and focus on getting a little better every day.

 

They don’t have a problem saying no.

Saying no is one of the most important things you’ll ever learn how to do. Focus on your top priorities and say no to all the stuff that’s wasting your time.

 

They don’t back down from challenges.

Emotionally strong people see challenges as opportunities to grow and improve their life. Challenges happen for a reason. Only when we have overcome them will we understand why they were there.
They don’t do things they don’t want to do.

If you want to keep your emotional balance and sanity intact, do what you love. Get rid of baggage and commitments that are making you miserable.

 

They don’t forget that happiness is a decision.

Emotionally strong people know that happiness is a choice. They understand the things they need to really be happy. They choose a life of simplicity, productivity, and passion.

 

They don’t waste time.

Abraham Lincoln said, “It’s not the years in your life that count. It’s the life in your years.” Emotionally strong folks don’t waste time doing mindless crap. They live mindfully in the present, enjoying every day as if it’s their last.

 

They aren’t afraid to ask for help.

Every single one of the great minds in history, from Einstein to Edison, had help along the way. You can’t do it all alone, and it takes an emotionally strong person to swallow their pride and ask for help.

 

They don’t hold themselves back.

Self-handicapping is a common trait among emotionally weak people. What this means is you make excuses and find ways to justify your inadequacies instead of finding ways to improve on them. If you want to change something, stop holding yourself back. Just start. Small victories lead to major changes.
They don’t mind working a little harder than everyone else.

    The heights by great men reached and kept were not attained by sudden flight, but they, while their companions slept, were toiling upward in the night. – Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Soak in these poetic words from Longfellow. Put in the work, and you’ll get the results you’re looking for.


They don’t overreact to things beyond their control.

Charles Swindoll said, “Life is 10% what happens to me and 90% how I react to it.” Think about how many times a day you overreact to things that really don’t matter. When you start to feel your blood boil, take a deep breath and ask yourself, “Is this really worth getting stressed out over?” Ninety-nine percent of the time, you’ll realize the answer is no.


They aren’t content with a mediocre life.

Emotionally strong people don’t settle for mediocrity. They strive to achieve greatness.


They never, ever give up.

Being emotionally strong means staring adversity in the face, learning from your mistakes, and living to fight another day. I’ll leave you with this inspiring quote from Harriet Beecher Stowe:

    When you get into a tight place and everything goes against you, till it seems as though you could not hang on a minute longer, never give up then, for that is just the place and time that the tide will turn.


Via Vilma Bonilla
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

There are excellent points made throughout. Emotional strength is about being able to live outside the spotlight and supporting others with compassion.

more...
Vilma Bonilla's curator insight, July 14, 2014 9:28 PM

"Do you feel swayed by the tides of your emotions or forces outside your control? Be more resilient by learning 17 things emotionally strong people don't do."

Education, Curiosity, and Happiness
What roles can curiosity and happiness play in learning?
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Purposeful Pedagogy
Scoop.it!

Ways to Use Lego in the Classroom

Ways to Use Lego in the Classroom | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Explore our enormous collection of teaching ideas and classroom activities to use Lego with your children. Includes a huge range of cross-curricular ideas and downloadable resources for all ages and abilities!
Via Bookmarking Librarian, Aysin Alp, Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
We used a variety of toys in our classroom, including Lego. Students can often take the lead in this conversation.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ivon Prefontaine
Scoop.it!

Homeschooling: Not So Eccentric Anymore | FlaglerLive

Homeschooling: Not So Eccentric Anymore | FlaglerLive | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
The number of American K–12 children educated at home increased from 1.09 million in 2003 to 1.77 million in 2012.
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
It is not for everyone, but for those who do it well it is great. I taught many students who were homeschooled and those parents who were committed to their child's education were supportive of my efforts. All they asked for was keeping lines of communication open.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Surviving Leadership Chaos
Scoop.it!

Leadership Cultivates Our Hope 

Leadership Cultivates Our Hope  | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

Some people believe they have earned the right to be leaders. Some are confident our experience or our education means we deserve to be leaders. Some of us think we have inherited leadership from our ancestors. Some people see themselves as having the personality or the ambition it takes to be a leader. 


Via donhornsby
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
Leading people involves giving them hope. Managing takes it away.
more...
donhornsby's curator insight, April 26, 3:34 PM
(From the article): The leaders I remember are the people who plant seeds in me every day. Even if it takes a long time for those seeds to grow and produce, they planted and cultivated them. Like persistent farmers, leaders cultivate hope that will produce for years to come. Whose leadership cultivates your hope today?
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from 21st Century School Libraries
Scoop.it!

What Changes When a School Embraces Mindfulness?

What Changes When a School Embraces Mindfulness? | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Taking the time to practice mindfulness, every day, several times a day, has made a big difference at a school trying to overcome trauma.
Via Bookmarking Librarian
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
The objective of mindfulness is to become present and aware. We practice becoming mindful, but it is important to integrate mindfulness as best as we can into living. It is not something we should pick and choose when to use and when not to use.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Classroom Culture: Creating positive learning environments!
Scoop.it!

Building Your Classroom Community

Create a tolerant and respectful environment that prevents bullying and other negative behaviors.

Via Mary Perfitt-Nelson
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
Community forms rather than is built. We build towns, cities, teams, etc. Community forms. What we have to be aware of and mindful of is the way we talk to each other and how we listen to each other. Respect for the other and being responsible for our actions becomes important. When children/students see and hear bullying that goes unaddressed, they copy the actions rather than the words.
more...
Mary Perfitt-Nelson's curator insight, April 20, 5:59 PM

Classrooms are social environments.  Here are some specific ways you can create a culture where everyone wins!

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Teaching and Learning in the 21st Century
Scoop.it!

Staying Present in the Classroom: Practicing Mindful Teaching

Staying Present in the Classroom: Practicing Mindful Teaching | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
How am I going to transition to the next lesson? What's that smell? What am I going to have the kids who finish early do until the bell rings? Do you think any of them actually like this book? I hope our staff meeting doesn't go long; I've got to get home to my puppy…

Via Marisol Araya Fonseca
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
As teachers gain experience, hopefully they become increasingly mindful and present in pedagogic situations. I am not sure all teachers can or even reach high levels.
more...
Marisol Araya Fonseca's curator insight, April 16, 8:15 PM
Emotions are very important when we are teachers.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Supports for Leadership
Scoop.it!

The Unexpected Ways Your Bad Boss Brings You Down

The Unexpected Ways Your Bad Boss Brings You Down | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Here are some surprising ways that a bad boss can impact you, and what you can do to prevent it.
Via george_reed, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
One has to be mindful and attentive to how toxic workplaces affect the rest of one's life. From a teacher's perspective, how does this impact how we teach and our students?
more...
george_reed's curator insight, April 12, 11:51 PM
The impact of bad leadership extends far beyond the workplace.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from digital divide information
Scoop.it!

The Uprooted

The Uprooted | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
War, sectarian violence, and famine have forced more than 50 million people from their homes—the largest number of displaced people since World War II.

Via Bonnie Bracey Sutton
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
This is the biggest challenge that faces people. What does it mean to educators worldwide? How do we become teachers without borders?
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from The Daily Leadership Scoop
Scoop.it!

Why Employees Don't Trust Their Leadership

Why Employees Don't Trust Their Leadership | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Of 33,000 workers globally, one in three said they don't trust their employer. What gives?

Via donhornsby, Bobby Dillard
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
When we conflate management and leadership, treating them as the same thing, we make the mistake of missing what leading is. It cannot be defined, but, when we see it, we recognize it.
more...
donhornsby's curator insight, April 7, 3:37 PM
(From the article): One in three people don’t trust their employer. That’s according to the new Edelman "Trust Barometer", a survey of 33,000 people in 28 countries about trust in the workplace.

 Among the other notable findings, trust decreases down an organization’s hierarchy: 64% of executives, 51% of managers, and 48% of rank and file staff say they trust their organizations, and employees say they trust peers more than CEOs when it comes to company information. Right now, many workers have their choice of jobs that boast high earnings and a range of career opportunities. To stay competitive in the war for talent, most employers are offering a full complement of benefits and perks as well as beefing up their efforts to engage workers through inclusion initiatives. Indeed, many employees among the Top 100 Great Places To Work reported being satisfied with their jobs, but also having a high level of trust for their companies.

 That’s obviously not the case everywhere, according to the Edelman Trust Barometer. The survey revealed gaps between factors that employees rate as important for building trust and how their leaders rated based on those attributes.
Scooped by Ivon Prefontaine
Scoop.it!

How Great Teacher Candidates Interview Differently

How Great Teacher Candidates Interview Differently | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
One principal’s interview mindset: If you are a candidate interviewing for a teaching position, I want to take a genuine moment to explicitly share what you are up against. As a principal, I a
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
I think this is an interesting article. I disagree with the premise of going in having checked out their blogs, Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, etc. If I wanted to check those, I would do it afterwards. What did the person tell me in the interview? Is it consisten with what is on the social media sites? The Lincoln quote supports that thinking.

Begin by understanding that the person across from you is not a candidate or a social media account. They are a person first.

Although my sample size is small, I am finding the teachers I am interviewing do not see themselves as "good students." They worked hard in school for their marks. What constitutes a "good teacher?" I have met prinicpals who I did not think were good teachers, so that is a big question.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from digital divide information
Scoop.it!

When Kids Have Structure for Thinking, Better Learning Emerges

When Kids Have Structure for Thinking, Better Learning Emerges | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Teachers are trying to get students to slow down and take note of how and why they are thinking and to see thinking as an action they are taking. But two other core components of metacognition often get left out of these discussions — monitoring thinking and directing thinking.

Via Nik Peachey, Dean J. Fusto, Bonnie Bracey Sutton
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Well worth reading. Teachers help with creating structure and a good environment. Engaged learning and activies that promote that help immensely.

more...
Michael MacNeil's curator insight, April 5, 2:32 PM

Well worth reading.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, April 6, 9:33 AM
Share your insight
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, April 6, 12:10 PM
Learning and critical thinking skills
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Effective Education
Scoop.it!

Diane Ravitch: Why all parents should opt their kids out of high-stakes standardized tests

Diane Ravitch: Why all parents should opt their kids out of high-stakes standardized tests | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
  The Network for Public Education, a nonprofit education advocacy group co-founded by historian Diane Ravitch, is calling for a national “opt out” of high-stakes standardized testing, urging parents across the country to refuse to allow their children to participate in this spring’s testing. In a video released on the network’s website, Ravitch says families should […]

Via Bonnie Bracey Sutton, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
Parents do not always know they can opt out. I told parents it was a choice and many appreciated that much.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Surviving Leadership Chaos
Scoop.it!

How To Take Care Of Business? Take Care Of Yourself

How To Take Care Of Business? Take Care Of Yourself | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Burn out in business is a very real thing. One of the main reasons I have been able to avoid it – across a career that has spanned 50 years – is because I have always made my health and wellness a priority. When I’m asked: ‘what’s the key to success in business’ my answer can differ depending on the subject at hand – delegation, people, learning from failure, etc – but when it comes down to it, the key is you. The simple fact is, if you don’t take care of yourself, you won’t be able to take care of business.

Via David Hain, donhornsby
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Good advice from Branson on keeping the mojo going so that your organisation thrives!


A healthy body equals a healthy mind, and a healthy mind takes care of business.

more...
David Hain's curator insight, April 1, 12:17 PM

Good advice from Branson on keeping the mojo going so that your organisation thrives!

donhornsby's curator insight, April 1, 1:06 PM

Good advice from Branson on keeping the mojo going so that your organisation thrives!


A healthy body equals a healthy mind, and a healthy mind takes care of business.

Hervé Odet's curator insight, April 15, 8:12 AM
Bonne lecture et pratique, Hervé Odet, Karuna Coach
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Learning & Mind & Brain
Scoop.it!

When is it Time to Quit Teaching?

When is it Time to Quit Teaching? | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Each year I seek clarity for my teaching career. There are no easy answers here. Know this. The question is serious, “Should I teach another year?” As I ponder my own path, let me take you on a journey of thoughts.
Via Yashy Tohsaku, Miloš Bajčetić
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
We should ask this question daily. I looked forward and miss being in the classroom. I do not miss the technocrats and bureaucrats outside the classroom. I do not miss those who sit silently and allow teachers to be oppressed.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Lyseo.org (ICT in High School)
Scoop.it!

Finland’s fighting inequality with education, and winning. What’s their secret?

Finland’s fighting inequality with education, and winning. What’s their secret? | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Finland has remade its education system to help kids like Lara Osman – born to poor, immigrant parents – grow up to be middle-class success stories.

Via John Evans, Aki Puustinen, Mika Auramo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
Education is about leading children in ways that provide them hope and being there for them in the present moment.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Self-organizing and Systems Mapping
Scoop.it!

Teams Who Share Personal Stories Are More Effective

Teams Who Share Personal Stories Are More Effective | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Storytelling leads to self-awareness.

Via june holley
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
Stories and humour help bridge many differences betweeen people.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Transformational Leadership
Scoop.it!

Leadership: For God's sake... Just Shut up !

Leadership: For God's sake... Just Shut up ! | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Sometimes Silence is the loudest statemen

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
Whether it is spoken, written, or electronically conveyed, less is often better in sharing what one thinks. The best leaders listen and find themselves being quiet.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from ICT's in Education
Scoop.it!

Why are our kids so miserable?

Why are our kids so miserable? | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
“Something in modern life is undermining mental health,” Jean Twenge, a professor of psychology at San Diego State University, wrote in a recent paper. Specifically, something is undermining young people’s mental health, especially girls.
Via Sarah Jorgensen
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
Play and having ways to cope with things when we come up short are important considerations. There is no one thing that contributes to unhappiness.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from 21st Century Leadership
Scoop.it!

The Disease of Being Busy

The Disease of Being Busy | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Our overscheduled lives leave little time for contemplation and reflection. How do we enable each other to pause and reflect together and ask how our hearts are doing?

Via Roy Sheneman, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
Busyness and dis-ease go hand-in-hand. Taking time for ourselves, others around us, and things we value is important. Time to reflect adds to the quality of life slowing down provides.
more...
Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, November 15, 2014 2:28 PM

This is a wonderful article written with a Sufi view of the world, at least from the way I understand Sufism. Slow down and smell the roses.

 

@ivon_ehd1

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

What Is Intrinsic Motivation?

What Is Intrinsic Motivation? | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Why do you do the things you do? If you are doing them for some internal reason, then psychologists would describe you as intrinsically motivated.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Intrinsic+Motivation

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching?tag=Engage-ME%21

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching?tag=Motivation

 


Via Gust MEES
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
Finding the right balance between intrinsic and extrinsic motivation is important for each person. Not everyone needs the same amount. What does that mean for teachers?
more...
Gust MEES's curator insight, April 12, 2:49 PM
Why do you do the things you do? If you are doing them for some internal reason, then psychologists would describe you as intrinsically motivated.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Intrinsic+Motivation

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching?tag=Engage-ME%21

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching?tag=Motivation

 

thefacemasterz's curator insight, April 12, 3:03 PM

best bridal makeup in lucknow http://www.thefacemasterz.com/

Walter Gassenferth's curator insight, April 13, 11:27 AM
Intrinsic Motivation is a very important topic and often overlooked by companies. For those who speak the Spanish or Portuguese, more about motivation can be read in http://www.quanticaconsultoria.com
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Sustainable Leadership to follow
Scoop.it!

Leadership and Trust | Leadership Learning Community

Leadership and Trust | Leadership Learning Community | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Trust comes up a lot these days in conversations about leadership, and especially in conversations about networks.  Recently I heard it mentioned numerous times in a recent SSIR webinar, The Network Leader Roadmap, definitely worth a listen.

Via Anne Leong, Pavel Barta
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
When we have organizations that are focused on management and conflate leadership with management, control becomes a necessity. Listening to people and supporting them are important in organizations.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Teacher's corner
Scoop.it!

How To Reach Every Student, Every Day -

How To Reach Every Student, Every Day - | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
One of the greatest gifts an educator can give to their learners is to see each one–really seeing each and every one of them–seeing each student’s uniqueness and interacting with each one based on that uniqueness. How? Some strategies to do this include:

Via TeachThought, Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
The boundary between teacher and learner is very thin, perhaps transparent and certainly permeable. It has a Jacques Derrida quality. Who is the teacher? Who is the learner? It looks more like teaching/learning, perhaps teaching-learning where the hypen bridges. These conditions (they are not strategies) are important foir teaching and learning.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from 21st Century Leadership
Scoop.it!

Want to be a better leader? Observe more and react less | McKinsey & Company

Want to be a better leader? Observe more and react less | McKinsey & Company | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

Most time-strapped executives know they should plan ahead and prioritize, focus on the important as much as the urgent, invest in their health (including getting enough sleep), make time for family and relationships, and limit (even if they don’t entirely avoid) mindless escapism. But doing this is easier said than done, as we all know—and as I, too, have learned during years of trying unsuccessfully to boost my effectiveness.

In my case, I stumbled upon an ancient meditation technique that, to my surprise, improved my mind’s ability to better resist the typical temptations that get in the way of developing productive and healthy habits. Much in the same way that intense, focused physical activity serves to energize and revitalize the body during the rest of the day, meditation is for me—and for the many other people who use it—like a mental aerobic exercise that declutters and detoxifies the mind to enhance its metabolic activity.


Via The Learning Factor, Roger Francis, Roy Sheneman, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Overloaded executives need coping mechanisms. This personal reflection shows how meditation can help. Respond rather than react. LIstening attentively is a response.

more...
Ines Bieler's curator insight, April 5, 1:42 PM

Overloaded executives need coping mechanisms. This personal reflection shows how meditation can help.

rodrick rajive lal's curator insight, April 7, 7:28 AM
Manish has writtern a wonderful article that suggests how one can be a better leader. While the adage, observe more react less is true, the means of doing this would require not reacting immediately, or even postponing decision making for another day. Meditating, relaxing by taking a break, and I guess 'sleepiong over the problem could be a great help.  It has been noticed that knee-jerk reactions to e-mails and other correspondences might cause more harm than good!
rodrick rajive lal's curator insight, April 7, 7:35 AM
Manish states very clearrly that it is not a good idea to react immediately to e-mails and make immediate decisions. Sometimes it is better to 'sleep over' over the problem! Taking a vacations before making a decision might help too!
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Help and Support everybody around the world
Scoop.it!

Carl Jung: “All the contents of our unconscious are constantly being projected into our surroundings….”

Carl Jung: “All the contents of our unconscious are constantly being projected into our surroundings….” | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Just as we tend to assume that the world is as we see it, we naïvely suppose that people are as we imagine them to be. . . .
All the contents of our unconscious are constantly being projected into our surroundings, and it is only by recognizing certain properties of the objects as projections or imagos that we are able to distinguish them from the real properties of the objects. . .
Cum grano salis, we always see our own unavowed mistakes in our opponent.
Excellent examples of this are to be found in all personal quarrels.
Unless we are possessed of an unusual degree of self-awareness we shall never see through our projections but must always succumb to them, because the mind in its natural state presupposes the existence of such projections.
It is the natural and given thing for unconscious contents to be projected.

Via David Hain, Ricard Lloria
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Projection - worth learning about, we all do it! Carl Jung wrote about education and I am just getting into that work.

more...
David Hain's curator insight, April 4, 11:57 AM

Projection - worth learning about, we all do it!

Ricard Lloria's curator insight, April 4, 4:58 PM

Projection - worth learning about, we all do it!

Scooped by Ivon Prefontaine
Scoop.it!

leading and learning: Readings for 21stC teachers working to transform education

leading and learning: Readings for 21stC teachers working to transform education | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
What is the purpose of education. We should not conflate school with education. School is part of a education, but as Dewey suggested education is not preparation for life. It is life.

What is worth studying and lingering over? That question takes us back to the eytmology of school.
more...
No comment yet.