Education, Curiosity, and Happiness
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How To Bounce Back From Failure - Happiness isn't the opposite of depression..resilience is

How To Bounce Back From Failure - Happiness isn't the opposite of depression..resilience is | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
"Happiness isn't the opposite of depression -- resilience is, according to psychologist Peter Kramer. Think of the people you most admire -- many of them didn't get where they are just by sailing through life without any negative experiences or failures. Most of them distinguished themselves by their ability to get right back up every time they fall, a truism reflected in countless inspirational quotations on the power of perseverance." This article presents seven habits of highly resilient people, with practical ways that you can improve your own ability to cope with life's challenges.

Via Anne Leong
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

Resilience suggests that something negative has happened.

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Sabine Henrichfreise's curator insight, May 5, 2014 7:32 PM

Enjoy your capacity or Resilience and you may find happiness. 

Education, Curiosity, and Happiness
What roles can curiosity and happiness play in learning?
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Diane Ravitch Urges Boycott of Standardized Tests, Saying They Do Nothing for Kids But Make Testing Companies Rich

Diane Ravitch Urges Boycott of Standardized Tests, Saying They Do Nothing for Kids But Make Testing Companies Rich | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
"Defend Your Child. Defend Learning. Opt Out." I am very glad that I attended public school during a time when we seldom, if ever, took a standardized test. On the rare occasion when we did, there were no consequences attached to our test scores. Our teachers saw our scores, but we did not. She or he learned something about how we were progressing or not. There was no time devoted to test prep, because the tests didn't matter. Practicing for a test would have been like "practicing" for a visit with the doctor. It makes no sense.

Via Bonnie Bracey Sutton
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Standardized tests kill creativity and curiousity. Students and teachers only have to focus on what is on the test. If standardization becomes ubiquitous, does it slide into the background and become normalized?
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Education Readings April 28th

Education Readings April 28th | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
By Allan Alach I welcome suggested articles, so if you come across a gem, email it to me at allanalach@inspire.net.nz What Are the Proper Purposes of a System of Schooling? ‘I’m raising this as a question.  Suppose you, magically, were part of a committee charged with developing, completely from scratch, a school system for our…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The link that is worth reading is the one about keeping our best teachers by not killing them with planning, marketing, and meetings. As well, the link to what is at the heart of great teaching has Parker Palmer quality to it.
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'Anumeric' people: What happens when a language has no words for numbers?

'Anumeric' people: What happens when a language has no words for numbers? | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Numbers do not exist in all cultures. There are numberless hunter-gatherers embedded deep in Amazonia, living along branches of the world’s largest river tree. Instead of using words for precise quantities, these people rely exclusively on terms analogous to “a few” or “some.”

In contrast, our own lives are governed by numbers. As you read this, you are likely aware of what time it is, how old you are, your checking account balance, your weight and so on. The exact (and exacting) numbers we think with impact everything from our schedules to our self-esteem.

But, in a historical sense, numerically fixated people like us are the unusual ones. For the bulk of our species’ approximately 200,000-year lifespan, we had no means of precisely representing quantities. What’s more, the 7,000 or so languages that exist today vary dramatically in how they utilize numbers.

Speakers of anumeric, or numberless, languages offer a window into how the invention of numbers reshaped the human experience. In a new book, I explore the ways in which humans invented numbers, and how numbers subsequently played a critical role in other milestones, from the advent of agriculture to the genesis of writing.

Via Wildcat2030, Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Somewhere in this is a message about integrating quality and quantity.
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The Difference Between Pedagogy, Andragogy, And Heutagogy

The Difference Between Pedagogy, Andragogy, And Heutagogy | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
The Difference Between Pedagogy, Andragogy, And Heutagogy

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Sarantis Chelmis
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
It is essential to know the difference. For examp.le, teacher education should follow andragogical principles and heutagogy as they gain experience.
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Teacher Appreciation Story #4

Teacher Appreciation Story #4 | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Gold stars At the time I was too busy being 13 to pay attention to the lessons that were being laid out before my seventh grade class, but in 1979 thirty of my classmates and I found ourselves learning enough about the social-emotional economic realities of the prepubescent classroom to write a doctoral thesis.   Of…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
When one of our sons was in Grade 4, he experienced his first male teacher. The year began with a female teacher who had been ill and it apparently became obvious she was not ready to return. I say "apparently" as our son did not think it was necessary to tell us and we did not hear from the school. Several other parents informed me and told me the new teacher yelled at the kids. When I asked our son, he said the new teacher was cool. Each student took care of an amphibian or reptile in an acqurium. Our son was excited. I asked about being yelled at. HIs answer suprised me. Apparently, the students were taking advantage of a substitute teacher while the new teacher sat in for a day or two. At one point on the Friday, he raised his voice and told the students they should not expect to behave that way on Monday and beyond. Our son paused and said "we deserved to be scolded. We were not behaving well." That teacher remains one of his favourite teachers, because he felt he was treated responsibly in being asked to care for one of the teacher's animals.
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Don’t Wait to Be Asked: Lead

Don’t Wait to Be Asked: Lead | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
A roadmap for increasing your influence at work.

Via John Lasschuit ®™
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I experienced resentment in schools when I tried to lead as a teacher. What is interesting is that pedagogy and educating are leading children based on etymology. In that sense, teachers are always leading.
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John Lasschuit ®™'s curator insight, January 7, 8:46 AM

Based on insights from Harry M. Kraemer. He offers the following roadmap to future leaders looking to change their organizations right now.

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‘Good Grammar’ Comes From Privilege, Not Virtue – The Establishment

‘Good Grammar’ Comes From Privilege, Not Virtue – The Establishment | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
It’s still mainstream to believe that the strict enforcement of standardized squiggles in English is a linchpin not only of communication but also of virtue.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I had to read quite a bit of the article to get to a point that made me stop and think. It is about not berating well-educated immigrants who speak and write in another language for their lack of English grammar. A teacher I interviewed posed a similar question for refugee children in our classrooms: "what have they experienced? How will that inform their learning?"
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Teacher Appreciation Story #3

Teacher Appreciation Story #3 | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
The term “the art of teaching” has become popular lately. A tribute to the fact that we do more than break students into data points and apply remedies for the pieces we find missing.  The Craft of our profession sits in nice contrast to the science of pedagogy.  That ability to measure growth and learning…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
One yeare I had a very unruly and disruptive student. Honesty was a big issue. I met one of the parents and the question ftor me was "what would it be like to live in that home?" The parent almost hit the child at one point.

As teachers, we make rules and they make sense, at least on the surface. Paul Ricoeur's radical or deep hermeneutics (a form of critical hermeneutic theory) gives teachers opportunities to dig below the surface and ask questions. The art of teaching is not a superficial thing of student compliance.
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What #Autism Can Look Like - Edutopia

What #Autism Can Look Like - Edutopia | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
“ Autism can be confused with misbehavior. Here are three autism behaviors to look out for and tips on how to respond to them.”
Via John Evans, Vicki Moro
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I disovered parents were an invaluable source of understanding how their children experienced their learning needs, including on the autistic spectrum. Parents want to help their children and many of them educate themselves to try accomplish that.
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Playing with Habits of Mind

Playing with Habits of Mind | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
The challenge for teachers is to build this understanding in our students. Our task is to enable their intelligence by helping them to understand the habits of mind and to then empower our students to make intelligent choices about the habits they deploy.

Via Nik Peachey, Audrey Foster
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I used Habits of Mind with my students and it was something that helped their learning. It gave them opportunities to be responsible for their learning.
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Margarita Saucedo's curator insight, December 2, 2016 10:18 AM
Esto se pude aprovechar y usar un tablero de Pinterest para realizar una actividad con los alumnos
Walter Gassenferth's curator insight, December 3, 2016 7:23 AM

Lucid post, presenting interesting data. For those who speak Portuguese or Spanish and are interested in business management, please visit http://blogwgs.tumblr.com/  

Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, December 5, 2016 1:38 PM
When taught in a way that students can understand them, the habits of mind work very well.
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The Strange Way Being “Good” Hurts Your Willpower

The Strange Way Being “Good” Hurts Your Willpower | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
When reflecting on the future self, the brain’s activation is identical to when it is considering the traits of another person,” writes Kelly McGonigal in The Willpower Instinct, a book that has helped me change the way I see and move toward my goals. So the Paulette of Next Year can feel like another kind of authority figure, someone trying to make me do something I don’t want to do today.
When I screw myself over, by getting in debt, being hungover, or procrastinating on my work until it becomes a flurry of panic typing, I rail against this person inside. “You’re the worst!” I tell myself.
According to McGonigal, I’m going about this all wrong. Firstly, she says, berating yourself for being “bad,” is only more likely to keep you from acting in the way you want to act. Guilt is a stressor, firstly, and stress weakens your willpower.
Secondly, by moralizing my behavior, labeling it as “good” or “bad,” I’m opening myself up to the risk of moral licensing.

Via David Hain
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
This is an interesting article.
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David Hain's curator insight, April 25, 5:59 AM

Why we need top learn to re-frame that inner voice...!

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Why Leaders Think They're Evolving When They're Not

Why Leaders Think They're Evolving When They're Not | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Most businesses have stripped employees of their identities, leading to a leadership identity crisis that infects businesses across America and prevents innovation and initiative. Leaders must encourage employees to passionately go above and beyond.

Via donhornsby
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
"The problem is that most businesses have stripped employees of their identities...."

Insert the word teachers for employees and schools for businesses and you have the essence of my dissertation. How does each teacher inform their particular identity in a sea of constraints? That is a question premised on a Judith Butler quote.
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donhornsby's curator insight, April 25, 10:26 AM
Only when you are being your most authentic self, sharing it and consistently living it every day, can you evolve into the inclusive leader most businesses and America needs.
 
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Being treehorned. School sucks.

Being treehorned. School sucks. | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
School Sucks. It Makes Kids Stupid. I'm so pleased that I chose the name TREEHORN as the title to the occasional papers that I used to send to like-minded friends. It's been so prophetic.  He started life as the hero of The Shrinking of Treehorn  by Florence Parry Heide. No adult, even his closest relatives…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
We should always ask what school is for and is it meeting those objectives. School is not just about preparing children for the workplace, although it has become that in many ways. We need to step away from the neo-liberal agenda that permeates schools and make it a space where children and adults enjoy going to.
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What Happened When I Stopped Lecturing (Try Active Learning!)

What Happened When I Stopped Lecturing (Try Active Learning!) | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Now, instead of listening to a lecture, students analyze case studies, work through ethics dilemmas, and complete ethics surveys in teams of three.

Via Becky Roehrs, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Students at all levels of school have to be engaged in their learning. The Grade 1 and Kindergarten teachers I interviewed described this as essential even with younger students. It had to make sense in their lives. Our pedagogic approach needs to reflect who we are as teachers and student needs at a particular time in their learning.
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Becky Roehrs's curator insight, April 26, 11:00 AM

I enjoy active teaching and learning so much more than lecturing, too..case studies-creating content-small group work..

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What Is Heutagogy?

What Is Heutagogy? | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
"Heutagogy is the study of self-determined learning ... It is also an attempt to challenge some ideas about teaching and learning that still prevail in teacher centred learning and the need for, as Bill Ford (1997) eloquently puts it 'knowledge sharing' rather than 'knowledge hoarding'. In this respect heutagogy looks to the future in which…

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Pedagogy and andragogy are essential to form a matrix from which to learn heutagogically. As people gain the skills, they are able to determine their learning. In effect, they take responsibility.
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Ana Cristina Pratas's curator insight, April 27, 3:04 PM

“Heutagogy is the study of self-determined learning … It is also an attempt to challenge some ideas about teaching and learning that still prevail in teacher centred learning and the need for, as Bill Ford (1997) eloquently puts it ‘knowledge sharing’ rather than ‘knowledge hoarding’. In this respect heutagogy looks to the future in which knowing how to learn will be a fundamental skill given the pace of innovation and the changing structure of communities and workplaces.”

Hase, S. and Kenyon, C. (2000). From andragogy to heutagogy. Ultibase, RMIT.  http://ultibase.rmit.edu.au/Articles/dec00/hase2.htm

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The Creativity Crisis: It’s Getting Worse

The Creativity Crisis: It’s Getting Worse | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
This is an executive summary of a follow-up report (2017) of “The Creativity Crisis” (Kim, 2011) that discovered American creativity in decline since the 1990s. The full report has been reviewed by several researchers, but it will not be public until it has gone through a lengthy review process.

Via Miloš Bajčetić
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I agree there is a rcreativity crisis. I would go one step further and argue it is a result of limiting the creativity of teachers. When we standardize teaching and learning, we limit the creative possibilities.
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The First Year Teaching: How do I involve parents and the community?

The First Year Teaching: How do I involve parents and the community? | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
When teaching, how can I involve parents and the community? In this article, I will tell you.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I was fortunate. I taught in a hybrid school setting with scheduled attendance and home schooling combined. Parents played a vital role in educating their children. As well, they provided contacts into the local community. I think teachers miss out on a lot if they do not use parents in meaningful ways, but there was a lot of resistance to teaching this way. It was seen as doing less teaching than others, even if they did not know what I (and my two colleagues) did and the energy and time that went into it.
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Minding the details of mind wandering

Minding the details of mind wandering | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
“Over the years, a number of different constructs have been unified under the single term ‘mind wandering,’ and through that process, the distinction between intentional and unintentional types was lost,” said Seli. “However, if intentional and unintentional types of mind wandering behave differently, and if their causes differ, then it would be exceptionally important to distinguish between the two. Without such a distinction, researchers will effectively conflate two unique cognitive experiences, and as a consequence, our understanding of mind wandering will be incomplete and perhaps even flawed.”


Via Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Is mind wandering good in some cases? I think it can be. It might be in those moments we explore and sow the seeds of creating. It may also point out a pedagogy need to engage each student in different ways. Learning who your students are is essential to teaching them.
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School Choice Advocacy Exposes Political Cowardice – Paul Thomas – Medium

School Choice Advocacy Exposes Political Cowardice – Paul Thomas – Medium | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
It has become fashionable for pundits to argue that fake news has created a post-truth America; however, mainstream media, in fact, carry the brunt of the responsibility because too often journalists…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I posted this from a different platfrom yesterday. Does a market based (neo-liberal) choosing a schooll for children improve schooling for all. It may for those who understand the choices and possible ramifications i.e. further disintegrating of community schools, long bus trips, and segregating some students. We socialize children into believing that echo chambers of sameness will improve schooling and prepare them for the future somehow. Does it? Maybe by improving our local schools in the community we could improve the schooling of each child.
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When Should a Controversial Topic Be Brought Into the Classroom?

When Should a Controversial Topic Be Brought Into the Classroom? | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Teachers should not shy away from addressing controversial issues in the classroom.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Within reason, this makes sense. What are students capable of having conversations about? It is a way to prepare them for the diversity they will experience in life in a safe way.
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The Art and Science of Getting into the Flow

The Art and Science of Getting into the Flow | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Research suggests that if you can cultivate the flow in your daily life, the benefits don’t just stop at job performance — the flow state of mind also contributes to health and well-being. But as soon as we try to bottle up the feeling and carry it into less appealing tasks, it seems to elude us. Rather than gettting in the flow, we end up disengaged and working harder than ever on work we just don’t appreciate.

Thankfully, cutting-edge psychological research can help us cultivate flow when we’re elbow-deep in work we don’t want to do. When facing difficult tasks, we can experience meaning, move through challenges, and embrace productivity while easing stress.

Quite simply, flow psychology offers an alternative to the daily grind: a way of working that is easier, more effective, and more enjoyable.

Via David Hain
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Flow activities are ones that truly engage participants. They range from busy and active to reflective and quiet. I had an activity called "The Culture of Peace" that was an example of the former and art was often like the second. Students would comment to each other they could "this" all day.
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David Hain's curator insight, April 26, 4:33 AM

How to find your flow! Everybody needs some time in this state...

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The Tyranny of Being On Task

The Tyranny of Being On Task | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Students need periodic breaks to ease brain strain, and the perceived demand that they should always be on task is unrealistic.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
What does it mean to be on task? It is essential to engage students in their learning through one's teaching. I learned that students who appeared engaged were often putting on a show. I had to learn how to overcome that.
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Ana Cristina Pratas's curator insight, April 26, 11:58 AM

"We should explore ways to incorporate brain breaks more into our classroom routines and norms. Some other practical strategies include:

 

Be mindful of students’ attention span and chunk activities and tasks appropriately.


Break up tasks with conversations and checks for understanding.
Admit personal challenges and failures related to staying on task.


Meet with students one on one to discuss off task behavior rather than shame them.


Smile and laugh more.


Balance louder and quieter activities.


Move more.


Brain breaks are essential to classroom culture and student learning. These seemingly off task moments are truly on task because they provide a space for students to learn better, and take into account the fact that students are growing and maturing. Brain breaks are responsive to students and help us become allies of their behavior rather than punitive figures. In fact, brain breaks help us as educators to rethink the binary nature of on task and off task and to realize that all the work is on task and helpful to children as they learn and grow."

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Tobacco and Patchouli: Writing about Teaching

Tobacco and Patchouli: Writing about Teaching | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
To teach, we must believe in the potential of each person in the room. Unwaveringly. This is not to say we don’t get to have our bad days, our off days, the days when we really can’t stand to talk to another student or plan another lesson. But it does mean that we teach for a reason, and that reason lies in what lies in the heart of a student. What lay in our hearts when we were students. Hope despair melancholy desire passion hunger confusion. All the things it takes to learn to walk. All the things it takes to learn to do anything. All the things it takes to live in Los Angeles, or to love someone who is hard to love.

Via Kim Flintoff
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
This is a great example of what the currere method can look like. How does this teacher understand his teaching and the need for generosity. David Jardine drew on Emmanuel Levinas to write about teaching as a gift that expects nothing in return.
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Liberal Learning as Conversation

Liberal Learning as Conversation | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
By John B. Bennett The values of liberal learning can be represented by the values that mark conversation: participation, engagement, openness to others.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I would add Hans-Georg Gadamer and David Bohm to the references, but this is a great article. Conversation and dialogue are different than discussion and debate. This can be used with care in K-12 school settings with teachers and students.
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Silicon Valley executives are hiring philosophers to teach them to question everything

Silicon Valley executives are hiring philosophers to teach them to question everything | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Silicon Valley is obsessed with happiness. The pursuit of a mythical good life, achievement blending perfectly with fulfillment, has given rise to the quantified self movement, polyphasic sleeping, and stashes of off-label pharmaceuticals in developers’ desks. Yet Andrew Taggart thinks most of this is nonsense. A PhD in philosophy, Taggart practices the art of gadfly-for-hire

Via L. García Aretio, juandoming
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
This has potenitial. I attended a weekend on philosophy in the classroom and critical thinking is largely shaped by classic and contemporary philosophy, but not to be confused with Socratic circles. These questions can take the form of what Gadamer called "eloquent questions," which help form the space for dialogue without certain answers.
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