Education, Curiosity, and Happiness
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» Why Does the Boss Prefer the Bully to You? - World of Psychology

» Why Does the Boss Prefer the Bully to You? - World of Psychology | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Bullying, it seems, pays off. Did you ever wonder why the bully gets away with it and even benefits with a promotion or other reward? Your gut feeling is

Via terry clarke
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

I discovered in education that the adult bullies were very adroit at reading the lay of the land. In some ways, they were victims of others above them in the hierarchy. One referred to his bosses as "the boss expects this or that".

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Education, Curiosity, and Happiness
What roles can curiosity and happiness play in learning?
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Opinion | How the Modern World Made Cowards of Us All

Opinion | How the Modern World Made Cowards of Us All | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

The connotation of prudence as caution, or aversion to risk, is a modern invention. “Prudence” comes from the Latin “prudentia,” meaning sagacity or expertise. The earliest English uses from the 14th century had little to do with fearfulness or habitual reluctance. Rather, it signified righteous decision making that is rooted in acuity and practical wisdom.



Via Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
"The connotation of prudence as caution, or aversion to risk, is a modern invention. “Prudence” comes from the Latin “prudentia,” meaning sagacity or expertise. The earliest English uses from the 14th century had little to do with fearfulness or habitual reluctance. Rather, it signified righteous decision making that is rooted in acuity and practical wisdom."

When applied to teaching and education, Gadamer described prudence (sageness and expertise) and other virtues i.e. care, imagination, and speaking truthfully as central to a concept known as Bildung. Artistotle used the word phronesis.
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Building a Culture of Continuous Learning for Teachers

Building a Culture of Continuous Learning for Teachers | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
We’re all familiar with the traditional model of professional development: an outside consultant comes in during the summer or at the beginning of the school year, spends a few hours or a couple of days introducing the new program or initiative, and leaves teachers with a stack of implementation materials.

And then teachers go back to the classroom, put the materials on the shelf beside the materials from last year’s new initiative, and go back to teaching the same way they always have.

It’s no mystery why this model for PD doesn’t spark lasting change in classroom practice. The mystery is why we ever expected it to in the first place.

The truth is, teachers, much like their students, need more than a one-shot lecture to master and apply new material. Effective professional development takes place within a continuous “Cycle of Learning” that includes targeted instruction, planning, application, and assessment.

Via Edumorfosis, Mark Cottee
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
There are good points made in the article. For example, the current model of teacher education is based on delivery of theory, often as a one time venture and teachers figuring out the practical on their own.

There is no mention of teacher voice and choice in the article. When I have a choice and express that choice in my voice, I want to learn what is being offered. Too often, it is voice and choice that is missing. We do not build cultures. They form.
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We’re asking kids all the wrong questions in school

We’re asking kids all the wrong questions in school | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Research, and common sense, show that kids learn more by being actively engaged in what they’re doing. When they engage in discussion, teach others, and grapple with a math problem, they boost their ability to absorb and retain information. The evidence is mounting against schools that fail to take this approach. Most are still built around making sure kids have the right answers to rote questions, rather than the tools to formulate meaningful questions that deepen their learning. In a randomized controlled trial of nearly 2,500 nine and 10 year-olds in the UK, students who were taught the skill of reason—how to formulate questions and thoughtfully explain an argument—performed better on assessments of math, science, and English than kids who had not been exposed to this kind of skill-building.
Via Miloš Bajčetić
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Content is a vehicle to teach skills. With skills, students can adapt to changing situations .
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What Happens When Teachers Stop Giving Grades?

What Happens When Teachers Stop Giving Grades? | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
The intrinsic love of learning supplants the drive for high marks in the long run.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
When I stopped giving grades, I provided students better feedback. I spent considerable time with the curricula (I taught multiple grades and subjects) to refine rubrics each time I used them. Teaching is relational and conversational.
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Paulo Freire, Pedagogy of the Oppressed, and a Revolutionary Praxis for Education, Part I

Paulo Freire, Pedagogy of the Oppressed, and a Revolutionary Praxis for Education, Part I | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

"For educators in the present-day context of a neoliberal assault on the very idea of schooling as a public good, Freire’s opus resonates even more keenly. When faux-reformers see curricula as “deliverables” and student learning as a “product,” when schools themselves are reduced to commodities like different brands of consumer goods, Freire’s repudiation of instrumentalist logic assumes a fierce new relevance. In an era where elites seem to view the basic humanity of so many of the world’s residents as a proposition open to debate, to assert the agency and worth of all of our students can be an act of revolutionary praxis for educators. Perhaps the best evidence of the revolutionary nature of Paulo Freire’s Pedagogy of the Oppressed is in how much it still has to teach us."

 

Via Audrey Watters

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

A profound appreciation of Freire for those confronting the cultural warfare in public education today. Author Paul Gannon makes a real attempt to construct the rarified language of pedagogical/revolutionary discourse in terms that can be usefully navigated by those unaccustomed to this terrain.


Via Jim Lerman, Miloš Bajčetić
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Freire's greatest contribution was the cautionary words that we not become "armchair revolutionaries." For people to speak, they must discover their voice. We have fallen into the malaise of trite and facile language i.e. empower, win-win, school reform, etc. as if those words engage people in changing their lives. It is through discovering one's voice and expressing what that means that we humanize education.
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Students are Better Off without a Laptop in the Classroom

Students are Better Off without a Laptop in the Classroom | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
What do you think they’ll actually use it for?
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
A laptop is a tool and like all tools how it is used is dependent on what is to be done. As Maslow put it, "if the only tool we have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail." Good teaching and learning understands the tools we use are based on the teaching and learning to be undertaken.
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5 Reasons I Stay in Teaching

5 Reasons I Stay in Teaching | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
I’d be lying if I said I haven’t thought about quitting the teaching profession. There are days when I feel burnt out and exhausted, but there are also some really amazing reasons I stay. I love learning. When I was in college, I still wasn’t sure what career I ultimately wanted to devote my life…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
They are a love of learning, having autonomy, make a postive difference in lives, keeps a person occupied, and a love of subject matter.
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Creativity :: Creative Educator

Creativity :: Creative Educator | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

This is a landing page in Melinda Wolk's wonderful website, Creative Educator. This section on Creativity contains 16 articles on various aspects of Creativity such as: 5 Hallmarks of a Creative Project, Creative Instructional Design and Cognitive Complexity, and 5 Essential Tools for a Creative Journey. Each article contains a research foundation, implementation examples, and links to useful resources. Very nice work! -JL


Via Jim Lerman
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
An interesting website with many ideas and links for classroom teachers.
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What Is Justice and When Is It Served?

What Is Justice and When Is It Served? | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
"One of the gravest mistakes people make is equating law with concepts of justice and fairness. In fact, the following phrase is engraved above the entrance of the United States Supreme Court building: 'Equal Justice Under Law.' It is important to note that it does not say 'Equal Justice' because that is limited to the context of the 'Law.' In other words, a court’s role is to resolve cases and controversies in accordance with the law, and to interpret the law, if necessary. By the way, 'fairness' is a synonym for 'justice.'

In order to conclude that 'Equal Justice' and 'Equal Justice Under Law' are the same, one must believe that laws are based upon concepts of fundamental fairness.... The law is the law and justice is justice. If the law is not necessarily just, how can 'Equal Justice Under Law' be just or fair?...

You may have noticed that I did not refer to 'Equal Justice.' My reason for removing the term 'Equal' is that whether or not 'Justice' is applied 'Equally' has been an ongoing source of debate throughout history."

Via Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
This is a provocative article that needs a thorough reading. It might make an interesting conversation and lesson starter in high school and university classes.
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Sharrock's curator insight, July 21, 1:35 PM
This statement is important to reflect on for high school students and older students as well: 

"One of the gravest mistakes people make is equating law with concepts of justice and fairness. In fact, the following phrase is engraved above the entrance of the United States Supreme Court building: 'Equal Justice Under Law.' It is important to note that it does not say 'Equal Justice' because that is limited to the context of the 'Law.' In other words, a court’s role is to resolve cases and controversies in accordance with the law, and to interpret the law, if necessary. By the way, 'fairness' is a synonym for 'justice.' In order to conclude that 'Equal Justice' and 'Equal Justice Under Law' are the same, one must believe that laws are based upon concepts of fundamental fairness.... The law is the law and justice is justice. If the law is not necessarily just, how can 'Equal Justice Under Law' be just or fair?... You may have noticed that I did not refer to 'Equal Justice.' My reason for removing the term 'Equal' is that whether or not 'Justice' is applied 'Equally' has been an ongoing source of debate throughout history."

This distinction is an important one. That umbrella statement "under the law" means that knowing the law is important for justice when involving the court system. The ideas of the insanity plea and certain conventions in the court room have a limited status. Common sense does not apply. This is difficult to grasp. 
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Teaching to the Edges Using Project-Based Learning -- THE Journal

Teaching to the Edges Using Project-Based Learning -- THE Journal | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
For these two teachers, PBL is the key to differentiating lessons for students of all ability levels.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Well-designed and thought out projects engage students. I used them throughout my teaching career. I discovered that PBL was not something I set up and let the students run. It was teaching, conversation, and asking questions throughout.
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Infidelity to Truth: Education Malpractices in American Public Education: Chapter Three

Infidelity to Truth: Education Malpractices in American Public Education: Chapter Three | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
By Duane Swacker About Duane Chapter 3 Justice Concerns and Educational Malpractices 'Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.' Martin Luther King, Jr. Historically in Western thought justice along with fortitude, prudence and temperance has been considered one of the four cardinal virtues. Comte-Sponville considers it the only cardinal virtue "that is an absolute…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
This chapter considers justice in schools.
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Cartoons: The Politics of Schooling

Cartoons: The Politics of Schooling | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
For this month, I have selected cartoons that get at the vulnerability of public schools to social, economic, and political demands. The cartoonist's pen captures how fads and fashions easily spill over schools since they are wholly dependent upon the beliefs and whims of taxpayers and voters for their annual budget. Enjoy.      …
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Those furthest from the classroom with the least experience get to decide what is done in our schools.
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The 10 Habits (of Mind) of Highly Effective Information Seekers | Designer Librarian 

The 10 Habits (of Mind) of Highly Effective Information Seekers | Designer Librarian  | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

I have been on blog-writing hiatus of late due to my new status as a PhD student in Information Science. Happily, this past year has given me plenty of time to delve deeply into the theoretical underpinnings of information literacy and information seeking. I learned a lot, and have been chewing on one problem in particular: What are the missing components of information literacy instruction? What is not currently being addressed?

 

Via Elizabeth E Charles
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
These habits of mind, based on Costa and Kallick's work, can ground the learning of skills by students. I taught them early in the year and we created posters to refer to throughout the year.
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How People Learn: An Evidence-Based Approach

How People Learn: An Evidence-Based Approach | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Deans for Impact believes that teacher educators should focus on how students acquire and retain information to help them build their critical-thinking and problem-solving skills.

Via Stephania Savva, Ph.D, Miloš Bajčetić
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I hope teachers use data and evidence in their teaching and student learning. Otherwise, what are we doing?
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Does the word 'teacher' still describe what educators do in the classroom?

Does the word 'teacher' still describe what educators do in the classroom? | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

In 2008, Heidi Williams, author of the book “No Fear Coding,” began asking herself some retrospective questions about her role as a teacher at an International Baccalaureate School in Racine, Wisc. These questions led her to the conclusion that the career she thought she entered was not the one she was experiencing, and it was time for her to refine her role and mission.

I don’t call myself a teacher anymore.

“I don’t call myself a teacher anymore,” says Williams. The title she prefers is “stretch instructor.” Williams adds: “Even as an administrator, I am a stretch instructor. I strive to reach every child.”

According to the Merriam-Webster Dictionary the word “teach” comes from the Middle English word techen, meaning “to show or instruct.” To Williams, that definition had built up too many negative connotations over time, including the implication that she was simply standing in front of a classroom dictating to children—something she felt was an inaccurate depiction.


Via Edumorfosis, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Actually, our school system was designed in the 19th Century to socialize young people into a factory system. Teaching is teaching despite what the article suggests. We can use new words and phrases, but teaching is responding to children's needs which means multiple roles are performed.
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Are Grades Diverting Focus From Real Learning? by Katrina Schwartz

Are Grades Diverting Focus From Real Learning? by Katrina Schwartz | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Grades help parents stay abreast of their student's progress, but theymay also be taking the focus away from learning.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Grades or marks are not a shorthand of how a student is doing as is suggested. They are a singular snapshot in time. When they appear on a report card, they are a statistical representation of cumulative efforts without reference to context.

Good learning is based on the good feedback from teachers. I found, when I stopped giving marks, (I still had to on report cards by decree) I provided better feedback, led with questions, and engaged in good conversations with, about, and through tools i.e. rubrics.
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A Letter to My New Principal

A Letter to My New Principal | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
We share evidence and practitioner-based learning strategies that empower you to improve K-12 education.

Via Dr. Deborah Brennan
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Teaching is human endeavour. The first two points in this letter underscore this. If a prinicipal cares about students, they care about the teachers. They engage them in conversation and support their teaching, because it will benefit children.
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Danger of assessing teachers / fake achievement / digital learning / inspirational teachers

Danger of assessing teachers /  fake achievement / digital learning / inspirational teachers | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Education Readings By Allan Alach I welcome suggested articles, so if you come across a gem, email it to me a
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The first link jumped out at me. Only in schools blindly adhering to a neo-liberal political and economic agenda would we tie student learning to teaching. Teaching is the teacher's responsibility and learning is the student's.
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The power of vulnerability – NewCo Shift

The power of vulnerability – NewCo Shift | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
An exploration of the counterintuitive notion that the ultimate form of confidence in leadership might just be vulnerability. “A late afternoon of what now seems several lives ago, I found myself […]”
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Parker Palmer writes that teaching done at the dangerous intersection of public and private lives. When we are fully alive, we are on that intersection. To have passion for something is to share the love of that subject with others, including the pain.
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Assessing Student Project Work

Assessing Student Project Work | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Project work challenges students to think beyond the boundaries of the classroom, helping them develop the skills, behaviors, and confidence necessary for success in the 21st-century. Designing learning environments that help students question, analyze, evaluate, and extrapolate their plans, conclusions, and ideas, leading them to higher–order thinking, requires feedback and evaluation that goes beyond a letter or number grade. The term “authentic assessment” is used to describe assessment that evaluates content knowledge as well as additional skills like creativity, collaboration, problem-solving, and innovation.

Authentic assessment documents the learning that occurs during the project-building process and considers the real-world skills of collaboration, problem solving, decision making, and communication. Since project work requires students to apply knowledge and skills throughout the project-building process, you will have many opportunities to assess work quality, understanding, and participation from the moment students begin working.

Via Jim Lerman
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Rubrics, when well thought-out and well-used, are great tools. The key is to sit with your curricula each time you assign a project and review the outcomes. Second, take time and discuss the rubric with students. What is expected? What do they understand and not? How can they use the rubric to guide their learning? Third, take time to talk and listen as they use the rubrics. A rubric is a conversation.
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Gust MEES's curator insight, July 21, 2:35 PM
Project work challenges students to think beyond the boundaries of the classroom, helping them develop the skills, behaviors, and confidence necessary for success in the 21st-century. Designing learning environments that help students question, analyze, evaluate, and extrapolate their plans, conclusions, and ideas, leading them to higher–order thinking, requires feedback and evaluation that goes beyond a letter or number grade. The term “authentic assessment” is used to describe assessment that evaluates content knowledge as well as additional skills like creativity, collaboration, problem-solving, and innovation.

Authentic assessment documents the learning that occurs during the project-building process and considers the real-world skills of collaboration, problem solving, decision making, and communication. Since project work requires students to apply knowledge and skills throughout the project-building process, you will have many opportunities to assess work quality, understanding, and participation from the moment students begin working.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=rubric

 

https://www.themespark.net/rubric/545a3834a500ffef33dd248b

 

Arizona State University, Claire McLaughlin's curator insight, July 22, 2:24 PM
Projects are widely used with EFL/ESL students because they can incorporate various levels and skills.  Assessing them can be tricky, but it doesn't have to.  There are various parts of assessment, including a link to making your own rubrics, in this article.
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Looking back to look forward. What skills can history teach our children in a post truth age?

Looking back to look forward. What skills can history teach our children in a post truth age? | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
I think its vital! Teaching history is one of the surest ways of teaching children how to evaluate and assess a mass of information. For a start, it’s about working out what’s important. How do you…

Via Mike Clare
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I do not subscribe to the notion that we live in a post-truth era. Truth still exists. History can assist us in finding ways to assess and judge the reams of information we encounter. It is not as if this were the first time in history propaganda and lies have been used.
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Educational Leadership:Gearing Up for Change:Empowering Teachers to Respond to Change

Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
By the nature of their teaching, teachers are leaders. It is not about empowering them, but inviting and engaging them in that leading that is essential. Educate and pedagogy are linked to leading through their etymological roots. The challenge is we have not moved past the ancient Greek thinking that teaching was done by those who had to be told what to do.
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Infidelity to Truth: Education Malpractices in American Public Education Introduction

Infidelity to Truth:  Education Malpractices in American Public Education Introduction | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
By Duane Swacker About Duane Swacker Introduction 'All truths are easy to understand once they are discovered; the point is to discover them.' Galileo Galilei "The righter we do the wrong thing, the wronger we become. When we make a mistake doing the wrong thing and correct it, we become wronger. When we make a…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
This is an introduction to a book by Duane Swacker.
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Education Readings July 21st

Education Readings July 21st | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
By Allan Alach I welcome suggested articles, so if you come across a gem, email it to me at allanalach@inspire.net.nz Ivan Snook: Assessing teachers - a plea for caution ‘In recent discussion of teaching in New Zealand it has been assumed that the achievement of students and schools can be directly attributed to the work…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Two links stood out: the difference between knowing and understanding, which is as much a philosophical point as a pyschological one, and a book by an inspirational teacher.
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Teaching Students to Dislike Poetry: “What is the most boring subject/possible?”

Teaching Students to Dislike Poetry: “What is the most boring subject/possible?” | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
As an avid reader, teacher, and writer/poet, I read poetry nearly every day, especially now that I am prompted wonderfully through social media such as Twitter. So Matthew Zapruder's recent Understanding Poetry Is More Straightforward Than You Think spurred both my Teacher-Self and my Poet-Self with his lede: Do you remember, as I do, how in the…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
How do we overcome the tendency to teach poetry in ways that turn off students? There are some great ideas in the post.
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