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for the love of learning: Time to weed out bad idea of merit pay

for the love of learning: Time to weed out bad idea of merit pay | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Merit pay and a lack of open conversation are the binaries we engage in our conversations. The business mind says throw money at it and we will solve the problem. Mindful use of money would be a place to start. We spend money in education and it is dubious it is being spent well. The other end is the concept that we cannot have open conversations in education. The result is we hide in corners and nothing changes. It is not money or silence that will solve the problems.

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Education, Curiosity, and Happiness
What roles can curiosity and happiness play in learning?
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What is art for? Alain de Botton's animated guide – video

What is art for? Alain de Botton's animated guide – video | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
In this exclusive video for the Guardian, philosopher Alain de Botton gives his top five reasons why art is such a vital force for humanity. Are we wrong to like pretty pictures? Watch and find out

Via Linda Alexander
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I wonder why the fine arts i.e. painting, sculpting, poetry, etc. are the first areas cut in School?

 

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Linda Alexander's curator insight, September 12, 7:30 PM

This is excellent!  Excellent!  Thanks, Edna for the post...

Cathryn Wellner's curator insight, September 14, 10:38 AM

So glad Linda Alexander found and shared this. Keep the link for days when your appreciation of beauty or your creative efforts take a beating in the face of the world's ills.

Suvi Salo's curator insight, September 20, 3:33 AM

Viisi selitystä taiteen olemassaololle.

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A Yoga Teacher’s Manifesto.

A Yoga Teacher’s Manifesto. | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Laughter releases tension from the diaphragm, lowers blood pressure, improves immune function, and releases endorphins.
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The advice is helpful for all teaching. Have a sense of humour and be yourself are good spaces for teaching to emerge from.

 

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7 Essential Books on the Art and Science of Happiness

7 Essential Books on the Art and Science of Happiness | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
From Plato to Buddha, or what imperfection has to do with the neuroscience of the good life.

If you, like me, are fascinated by the human

Via Anne Leong
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

These are excellent choices. Learning and happiness are intertwined. Children who learn tend to be happy. The key is make sure curiosity remains open. Here we find the love of that is sacred in the world.

 

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15 Scientifically Proven Ways to Be Happier

Anyone can feel happier. It's easy. Science says so.

Via Wellenwide
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This is a great infographic for School. Happy people, including teachers and students, are more productive in their work. In fact, their work might not even seem to be work.

 

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Nancy Jones's curator insight, August 9, 1:10 PM

Great infographic with information worth sharing and thinking about.

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The Marriage of Meaning and Happiness

The Marriage of Meaning and Happiness | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Happiness, purpose and meaning are top priority for Millennials. The marriage of meaning and happiness is challenging yet needed blend.
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The Viktor Frankl quote is important in this article. He wrote the definitive books on meaning in life. The work we do i.e. teaching has to have meaning. Work is embedded in life. It is married to who we are as a person.

 

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Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, August 4, 6:34 PM

We want to be happy, find our purpose, and live a life of meaning. We want to change the world.


If Millennials had a slogan, this would be it.


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Metacognition | Center for Teaching | Vanderbilt University

Metacognition | Center for Teaching | Vanderbilt University | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

"Metacognition is, put simply, thinking about one’s thinking.  More precisely, it refers to the processes used to plan, monitor, and assess one’s understanding and performance. Metacognition includes a critical awareness of a) one’s thinking and learning and b) oneself as a thinker and learner."


Via Beth Dichter, Nancy Jones
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Learning about our learning is essential and helps us understand how to move the learning into new areas. It includes pedagogy which helps students find new pathways that are never the same one time to the next and is never the same for all students. Teaching and learning explore who we are and how not just what we learn and how we learn.

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Jimena Acebes Sevilla's curator insight, July 26, 2:17 PM

Meta-conocimiento... 

niftyjock's curator insight, July 28, 6:26 PM

Being a man, I'm very poor at reflection, but by breaking it into metacognitive practices helped me think about my thinking. 

David Baker's curator insight, July 29, 6:13 PM
The recommendations for developing a “classroom culture grounded in metacognition” are great teaching insights and this serves as a powerful link to the research. The following excerpt is one nugget."Giving Students License to Identify Confusions within the Classroom Culture:  ask students what they find confusing, acknowledge the difficultiesIntegrating Reflection into Credited Course Work: integrate short reflection (oral or written) that ask students what they found challenging or what questions arose during an assignment/exam/projectMetacognitive Modeling by the Instructor for Students: model the thinking processes involved in your field and sought in your course by being explicit about “how you start, how you decide what to do first and then next, how you check your work, how you know when you are done” (p. 118)

To facilitate these activities, she also offers three useful tables:

Questions for students to ask themselves as they plan, monitor, and evaluate their thinking within four learning contexts—in class, assignments, quizzes/exams, and the course as a whole (p. 115)Prompts for integrating metacognition into discussions of pairs during clicker activities, assignments, and quiz or exam preparation (p. 117)Question"
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17 things emotionally strong people don’t do

17 things emotionally strong people don’t do | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

Once you believe you are strong emotionally, you will unconsciously act stronger than before and begin to take control over your emotional whims. – Senora Roy

Life is a series of stories, and each one of us has a unique story to tell. Billions upon billions of stories and no two are exactly the same. If the story of your life has been filled with more sad moments than happy ones, it’s time to change that. And the best place to start is within your head.

You have the power to create the life you want. One crucial skill that will help you get there is learning how to become emotionally strong. The good news is emotional strength is like a muscle: the more you use it, the stronger it becomes.

In this article, you’ll learn 17 things emotionally strong people don’t do … so you can start creating the existence you’ve always imagined for yourself.


They don’t beg for attention.

Emotional strength means confidence, and confident people don’t need to constantly be the center of attention. They’re comfortable in their own skin.


They don’t allow others to bring them down.

Emotionally strong people ignore the haters and the naysayers. They weed these people out and surround themselves with positive people instead.

 

They don’t stop believing in themselves.

    Somehow I can’t believe that there are any heights that can’t be scaled by a man who knows the secrets of making dreams come true. This special secret, it seems to me, can be summarized in four C’s. They are curiosity, confidence, courage, and constancy, and the greatest of all is confidence. When you believe in a thing, believe in it all the way, implicitly and unquestionable.  – Walt Disney

Soak up these amazing words from Walt Disney. Because belief is the most essential quality of emotional strength.

 

They’re not afraid to love.

    Love is the force that transforms and improves the Soul of the World.  – Paulo Coelho

People who possess emotional strength have experienced heartbreak. But it doesn’t hold them back … it makes them stronger. Just because you’ve been hurt doesn’t mean you should shut love out of your life. Open up your heart and embrace vulnerability. The love you find will be worth everything you go through to get it.

 

They’re not afraid of slowing down.

Sometimes you need to take a step back and slow it down when you’ve been pushing yourself too hard. Having drive is great but not at the expense of your health and well-being. Allow yourself time for reflection and relaxation.


They refuse to be a victim of circumstance.

Being emotionally strong means refusing to make excuses. Leave the past behind you and focus on getting a little better every day.

 

They don’t have a problem saying no.

Saying no is one of the most important things you’ll ever learn how to do. Focus on your top priorities and say no to all the stuff that’s wasting your time.

 

They don’t back down from challenges.

Emotionally strong people see challenges as opportunities to grow and improve their life. Challenges happen for a reason. Only when we have overcome them will we understand why they were there.
They don’t do things they don’t want to do.

If you want to keep your emotional balance and sanity intact, do what you love. Get rid of baggage and commitments that are making you miserable.

 

They don’t forget that happiness is a decision.

Emotionally strong people know that happiness is a choice. They understand the things they need to really be happy. They choose a life of simplicity, productivity, and passion.

 

They don’t waste time.

Abraham Lincoln said, “It’s not the years in your life that count. It’s the life in your years.” Emotionally strong folks don’t waste time doing mindless crap. They live mindfully in the present, enjoying every day as if it’s their last.

 

They aren’t afraid to ask for help.

Every single one of the great minds in history, from Einstein to Edison, had help along the way. You can’t do it all alone, and it takes an emotionally strong person to swallow their pride and ask for help.

 

They don’t hold themselves back.

Self-handicapping is a common trait among emotionally weak people. What this means is you make excuses and find ways to justify your inadequacies instead of finding ways to improve on them. If you want to change something, stop holding yourself back. Just start. Small victories lead to major changes.
They don’t mind working a little harder than everyone else.

    The heights by great men reached and kept were not attained by sudden flight, but they, while their companions slept, were toiling upward in the night. – Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Soak in these poetic words from Longfellow. Put in the work, and you’ll get the results you’re looking for.


They don’t overreact to things beyond their control.

Charles Swindoll said, “Life is 10% what happens to me and 90% how I react to it.” Think about how many times a day you overreact to things that really don’t matter. When you start to feel your blood boil, take a deep breath and ask yourself, “Is this really worth getting stressed out over?” Ninety-nine percent of the time, you’ll realize the answer is no.


They aren’t content with a mediocre life.

Emotionally strong people don’t settle for mediocrity. They strive to achieve greatness.


They never, ever give up.

Being emotionally strong means staring adversity in the face, learning from your mistakes, and living to fight another day. I’ll leave you with this inspiring quote from Harriet Beecher Stowe:

    When you get into a tight place and everything goes against you, till it seems as though you could not hang on a minute longer, never give up then, for that is just the place and time that the tide will turn.


Via Vilma Bonilla
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

There are excellent points made throughout. Emotional strength is about being able to live outside the spotlight and supporting others with compassion.

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Vilma Bonilla's curator insight, July 14, 4:28 PM

"Do you feel swayed by the tides of your emotions or forces outside your control? Be more resilient by learning 17 things emotionally strong people don't do."

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Can Mindful Managers Make Happier Employees? | Mindful

Can Mindful Managers Make Happier Employees? | Mindful | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Want more productive and satisfied employees? A new study suggests that companies should consider mindfulness training for managers. (Former les #managers à la pleine conscience pour des employés plus #heureux ?

Via Nicole S. Bakhazi, Lynnette Van Dyke
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

It would not be a given, but it certainly provides more possibilities for happiness. I found days I was stressed and less present for students were harder for them and, when I was more present, they were happier.

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Happiness classes should become part of the school curriculum new study suggests

Happiness classes should become part of the school curriculum new study suggests | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Happiness should become part of the school curriculum in a bid to improve our children’s deteriorating mental health and cut down the nation’s mental health bill for years to come.

Via Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Maybe we should include play in the teaching and learning time?

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Why Teenagers Act Crazy

Why Teenagers Act Crazy | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
It’s not their fault. It’s all in the timing of brain development.

Via Nancy Jones
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

It is an interesting article. Adolescence and its changes begin before the teen years and extend beyond the teen years which suggest serious implications for teaching.

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Nancy Jones's curator insight, June 29, 10:43 AM

Interesting connection with the anxiety we seem to be notting in more adolescents. 

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Will Good Things Happen When You "Pay It Forward?"

Will Good Things Happen When You "Pay It Forward?" | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Much has been written about the need for and the power of generosity in our society, including the notion of “pay it forward.” The expression has been popularized by the best selling novel Pay It

Via Enzo Calamo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The short answer is yes. There is karma. Emmanuel Levinas writes about gift giving which does not anticipate any reciprocity. Teaching in its purest sense is gift-giving of that nature. We can never anticipate the rewards.

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Psychologists Find that Nice People Are More Likely to Hurt You

Psychologists Find that Nice People Are More Likely to Hurt You | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
People who are agreeable are also more likely to make destructive choices, if they think doing so will help them conform to social expectations. That's the finding of psychologists, who suggest that disagreeable, ornery people may be more helpful than we think.

Via Chris Carter
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This is interesting. I don't think it means that good people cannot make good decisions. Good means something different than nice. Nice is about not rocking the boat. Sometimes being a good person requires rocking the boat. I know it does not go over well with School managers.

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Chris Carter's curator insight, June 28, 10:42 AM

Yes! I'm ornery! Love this!

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Neuroscientist Antonio Damasio Explains Emotions | MIT Technology Review

Neuroscientist Antonio Damasio Explains Emotions | MIT Technology Review | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
The neuroscientist Antonio Damasio explains how minds emerge from emotions and feelings.

Via Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This is a great article by a leading researcher in the research on emotions.

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Twelve Dalai Lama quotes on happiness

Twelve Dalai Lama quotes on happiness | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

The 14th Dalai Lama was born as Lhamo Dondrub in a village in Tibet in 1935.

He fled his home during the Chinese occupation of Tibet and soon set up a government in exile in India.

The monk has been the spiritual leader of his people and his religion since he was 15 years old. He's also one of the foremost authors and philosophers within Tibetan Buddhism, having authored books like "The Art of Happiness: A Handbook for Living," "How To Practice: The Way To A Meaningful Life," and "Beyond Religion: Ethics for the Whole World."

In 1989 he won the Nobel Peace prize, and he continues to travel the world giving talks on compassion, the nature of truth, and happiness.


Via Vilma Bonilla
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This is are all excellent. I like the one about sleeping with a mosquito.

 

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How Unethical Behavior Becomes Habit

How Unethical Behavior Becomes Habit | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
The road to hell descends gradually.

Via Stepped Leader
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Ethical behaviour is relational and contextual. It is not fixed by  predetermined rules but negotiated within the relational structure of a particular context against historical and cultural norms. When we see rules as fixed, we fall into the trap of thinking there is only one way to encounter our ethical responsibilities.

 

Teaching is an example of ethical behaviour and its relational nature. We are always in relationship with someone and teaching about something. Our conduct and comportment is a message that is only speakable through our behaviour which will include words and actions.

 

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26 Secrets of Happiness: Quotable Quotes | Reader's Digest

26 Secrets of Happiness: Quotable Quotes | Reader's Digest | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

Find inspiration and joy from these leading thinkers.


Via Linus J Fernandes
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The first one is from the Dalai Lama. I always wonder how actors and actresses became the source of wisdom?

 

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Avoid Burnout by making sure you Regularly do what you Love

Avoid Burnout by making sure you Regularly do what you Love | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Burnout is a real problem when you're in a demanding job or are a superachiever . The biggest cause of burnout, however, might not be your inability to take a break from work, but being kept from doing what you love or is important to you.

Via TechinBiz
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I found the key for me was not letting School managers suck the enjoyment from me. When I let my guard down, I gave them control. When I was mindful and present in my work, I took control.

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7 Playful Ways to Teach Kids Manners

7 Playful Ways to Teach Kids Manners | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Yes, those good old p's and q's still matter--but teaching them calls for a creative approach. Read on for fun ways to get your kids schooled in the essentials of etiquette. You'll thank us!

Via Dr. Amy Fuller, Sandra - Onlinevents
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Those two words, thank you, can mean so much when used authentically and kindly with children. They learn to be thankful as adults model appropriate behaviours. Play and education are inseparable.

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5 Ways to Suppress Your Inner Serial Scheduler & Create More Space in Your Life

5 Ways to Suppress Your Inner Serial Scheduler & Create More Space in Your Life | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

"Do you ever daydream about a superhero alter ego? In my reveries, I’m a mad scientist remixing the brain chemistry of the clinically depressed and injecting the chronically unconfident with invisible vials of self-love. I’m changing the world, in short, by sharing one Yoga or meditation practice at a..."


Via craig daniels
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The idea of a serial inner scheduler is interesting. It contributes to a hyper-kinetic life and we need time to just be.

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Buddhist Economics: How to Stop Prioritizing Goods Over People and Consumption Over Creative Activity

Buddhist Economics: How to Stop Prioritizing Goods Over People and Consumption Over Creative Activity | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
"Work and leisure are complementary parts of the same living process and cannot be separated without destroying the joy of work and the blis

Via Keith Wayne Brown
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Right Livelihood is a key point. If we enjoy and find joy in our work, that is what makes it profitable. I found the points about "experts and specialists' interesting. I am reading Wendell Berry and he makes similar points. I wondered how this fits with teaching? Do we make teachers into specialists in ways that it becomes difficult to build relationships with students, families, colleagues, and the subject matter they teach? In the specialization, do we succumb to instrumental ways of teaching which create problems in learning? I am not sure instrumental and teaching fit that way.

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Your Job Doesn't Define You

Your Job Doesn't Define You | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
It took me a long time to realize that my work didn’t have to define me. All that mattered was that I could pay my bills while working toward my dream.
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I love teaching. For years, I got up and was excited to go and make a difference. I let others dictate what I found fulfilling making it into a binary where it was either good or bad.

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8 Things The Happiest People Have In Common

8 Things The Happiest People Have In Common | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
There's plenty of lists giving you reasons you're unhappy. Here's how to actually become happier.

Via Sandeep Gautam, Bobby Dillard
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

It is interesting to note that the only reference to work is helping others. I found the isolation in teaching worked against helping the other adults in the building and I found it was not always appreciated. Helping the students and their families worked for many years.

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Sandeep Gautam's curator insight, July 7, 6:38 AM

Seven habits to inculcate for a happier, more meaningful life:-)

Wanda McKenzie's curator insight, July 7, 11:08 AM

this could be turned into a to-do list

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The Difference Between Knowledge and Experience

The Difference Between Knowledge and Experience | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
What's the difference between knowledge and experience, and how does you brain process both? Which is more important for creative thinking? Buffer's Belle Beth Cooper investigates.

Via Kathleen Cercone, Bill Ferguson
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Knowledge, as bits and fragments, is not necessarily connected. Experience and wisdom are the glue. This is what makes learning in concrete situations (Dewey) so important.

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How to take criticism well

How to take criticism well | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
No one likes getting criticism. But it can be a chance to show off a rare skill: responding to negative feedback well.

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Criticism

 


Via Gust MEES, Lou Salza
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

94% of human resources people might say they prefer positive feedback, but that does not explain when they escort an employee of site. I find it useful to ask for examples. I once had a School manager suggest I was being unprofessional, but, when I asked for an example, he had none.

 

Feedback and criticism are necessary for growth. The relationship we have with employees and students is important in providing feedback and criticism. I eliminated giving marks on many activities and used rubrics as a way to guide learning. These were well explained to the students and became useful in student learning.

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David Hain's curator insight, June 29, 2:28 AM

Feedback is the DNA of development. Learn how to ask for it and take it.  Oh...and the more you give, the more you get!

Eliane Fierro's curator insight, July 1, 12:20 AM

Embrace criticism!

Philip Powel Smith's curator insight, July 29, 8:04 AM

Criticism is always a difficult pro-active action that educators have to give. Criticism without ridicule and shame is what students need to hear and an explanation of how to make the changes to be better learners and communicators.

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The Employee Trinity: Engaged, Happy and Motivated | Switch and Shift

The Employee Trinity: Engaged, Happy and Motivated | Switch and Shift | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Leaders are often looking for ways to increase the efficiency of their workforce. By engaging them enthusiastically, logically and collectively, employee

Via Anne Leong
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

For the better part of my teaching career, these three existed. As School managers began to tell me what my work was without any sense of knowing what it was, these were eroded. We each need a job with a capital J and we need to stop doing the work of others.

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