Education, Curiosity, and Happiness
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Bullying Is an Adult Issue First

Bullying Is an Adult Issue First | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
How can we teach the children to not be bullies, if the adults are unaware that the words we use and the actions we take divide and hurt and maybe even bully?

Via Dan Kirsch
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

Oh, yes it is! It begins with the adult-on-adult and adult-on-child bullying and children learn this from the modeling.

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Education, Curiosity, and Happiness
What roles can curiosity and happiness play in learning?
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The non-western books that every student should read

The non-western books that every student should read | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Leading authors pick international classics that should be on every students’ bookshelves, but are often neglected by universities

Via iPamba
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
These books would be for high school and beyond. Some of them might prove challenging for high school i.e. Frantz Fanon. They will shake people in ways that will make them think.

An author I might add is bell hooks. I recall the first time I read her work I struggled, feeling attacked as a male. With time, I grew to appreciate that part of her books.
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Lecturers recommend: non-western cinema that every student should see

Lecturers recommend: non-western cinema that every student should see | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
University tutors select the foreign films to watch for a new perspective on the world

Via iPamba
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Good cinema is a wonderful tool to open students up to a world they might not otherwise realize is out there.
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Multicultural Education to Promote Human Rights Education

Multicultural Education to Promote Human Rights Education | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Multicultural education is a team effort and for it to serve as a means of promoting human rights education, it needs a multi-pronged approach.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
A phrase that emerged in my dissertation was "differences make a difference." Hannah Arendt wrote about human diversity and its importance to us as teachers and students. Gert Biesta refers to radical contingency. We learn about diversity in the midst of it and who we become is contingent on divesity.
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How A Small Coffee Shop Beats The Corporate Giant… – surTHRIVAL Skillz – Medium

How A Small Coffee Shop Beats The Corporate Giant… – surTHRIVAL Skillz – Medium | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
The owner of this coffee and tea shop is either a masochist or brilliant. I’m leaning towards brilliant. On the negative side, who do you think faces them across the street? That’s right. Starbucks…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Something I gleaned from the article, because it was not spelled out explicitly, was that small means getting to know your customers and forming relationships with them.

When I apply this thinking to school (I do not believe school is a business in any way, that students are consumers, and teachers are entrepreneurs), small schools bring out relationships with each other and the subjects we teach and learn. Teachers get to know their students and their families. What a difference that makes as opposed to large corporate style cram schools.
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Creating your own wisdom journal

Creating your own wisdom journal | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Putting thoughts down in a journal is a useful leadership exercise. When doing so, it is important to include more than what is happening now but also what could go wrong.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I use the method of currere (William Pinar) to explore my lived experiences and journal. As well, I jot notes down. The two benefit my thinking, learning, and teaching
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Critical Pedagogy: How to respond to ‘future-focused’ discourse

Critical Pedagogy: How to respond to ‘future-focused’ discourse | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
“So it was an instrument of radical change, that’s what they thought it was. And then around about the middle of the 1980s …this computer got into the hands of school administrations an…
Via Ines Bieler
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I remember a conversation with a young teacher. She told me they had used Paulo Freire in an undergrad class. It was not about critical pedagogy, but inquiry-based learning. The list of names i.e. Henry Giroux, bell hooks, Patti Lather, etc. is not about inquiry-based learning. Critical pedagogy is a continuous moral project to develop an awareness of social justice and freedom.

I was intrigued by the Seymour Papert and Paulo Freire quote. I had not considered the former a critical theorist.
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A Simple Trick for Getting Students to Ask Questions in Class

A Simple Trick for Getting Students to Ask Questions in Class | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Your students have questions, but they rarely ask them—especially at the beginning of the semester. They feel awkward or embarrassed, or maybe it’s just inertia. Whatever the cause, the vast majority of student questions go unasked. For teachers, this is wildly frustrating because we can’t answer the questions they don’t ask (though some questions can be anticipated). In many cases, the unasked questions represent anxieties and uncertainties that negatively affect students’ performance in class and inhibits their learning. This is a particular problem in the sophomore composition class I teach. It has a reputation as a difficult class, so many students arrive intimidated and nervous.

Via Elizabeth E Charles
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Students often feel unsure about asking a question. This is more the case early in the school year as they learn the lay of the land. Using index cards to provide some sense of safety and anonymity can be helpful.
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Elizabeth E Charles's curator insight, October 14, 8:49 AM
This could be replicated online by getting students to post on a Padlet wall, or Google doc.
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Turning Teaching Upside Down

Students learn more when we let them wrestle with a math problem before we teach them how to solve it.
Back in the 20th century, I was taught how to teach mathematics pretty much the same way I had learned it. My fellow preservice teachers and I were told to prepare our lessons thoroughly, present the intended concept or procedure clearly (and with enthusiasm!), and guide students as they worked through some examples. Eventually, we would assign homework, including a few word problems in which students would apply the procedure they had just learned. We hoped students would ask questions if they didn't understand.

Via Mel Riddile, Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Begin with problems. This is very John Dewey-like.
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The Evidence Base for How We Learn: Supporting Students’ Social, Emotional, and Academic Development - The Aspen Institute

The Evidence Base for How We Learn: Supporting Students’ Social, Emotional, and Academic Development - The Aspen Institute | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

"The Evidence Base for How We Learn: Supporting Students’ Social, Emotional, and Academic Development articulates the scientific consensus regarding how people learn. The research brief presents a set of consensus statements—developed and unanimously signed onto by the Commission’s Council of Distinguished Scientists—that affirm the interconnectedness of social, emotional, and academic development as central to the learning process.

"The brief draws from brain science, medicine, economics, psychology, and education research to describe why it is essential to address the social, emotional, and cognitive dimensions of learning; how these dimensions together shape students’ academic and life outcomes; and how these competencies can be taught throughout childhood, adolescence, and beyond. The evidence outlined in this brief moves the nation beyond the debate as to whether schools should attend to students’ social and emotional development, to how schools can integrate social, emotional, and academic development into their daily work."


Via Jim Lerman, NikolaosKourakos, Bonnie Bracey Sutton
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Learniing is linked to healthy social and emotional opportunities children encounter to solve problems. John Dewey argued that learning is problem solving and much of it is social. I think play is essential to learning.
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Dove Nobel's comment, October 11, 10:47 AM
http://mcafeeantivirustechsupportphonenumber.blogspot.com/2017/10/a-technical-guide-is-available-to.html
Gust MEES's curator insight, October 11, 7:51 PM

The Evidence Base for How We Learn: Supporting Students’ Social, Emotional, and Academic Development articulates the scientific consensus regarding how people learn. The research brief presents a set of consensus statements—developed and unanimously signed onto by the Commission’s Council of Distinguished Scientists—that affirm the interconnectedness of social, emotional, and academic development as central to the learning process.

"The brief draws from brain science, medicine, economics, psychology, and education research to describe why it is essential to address the social, emotional, and cognitive dimensions of learning; how these dimensions together shape students’ academic and life outcomes; and how these competencies can be taught throughout childhood, adolescence, and beyond. The evidence outlined in this brief moves the nation beyond the debate as to whether schools should attend to students’ social and emotional development, to how schools can integrate social, emotional, and academic development into their daily work."

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=learning

 

Mark Cottee's curator insight, October 12, 10:08 PM
Short report that just happen to pop into my in tray at the same time as my attention to a MOOC on the science of teaching. 
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No more excuses

No more excuses | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
We all make excuses. Whether they cover up for why we were late (“There was no parking”), provide a reason as to why we didn’t do that errand that our spouse requested (“It didn’t get into my to-do list”), seek to justify why we broke our diet (“There we SO many sweets on the table”), or attempt to explain why we didn’t get the business deal (“My competition swept in and undercut me”), we use excuses throughout our day to justify our errors and explain away our failings.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Take responsibility for your actions and words. Teaching and leading are linked etymologically through pedagogy and educate. When teachers take responsibility for their teaching, which is not student learning, they are role models for students.
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10 Tips for Creating a Fertile Environment for Kids’ Creativity and Growth

10 Tips for Creating a Fertile Environment for Kids’ Creativity and Growth | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
“Mitchel Resnick of the MIT Media Lab applies the Creative Learning Spiral to show how parents and educators can better support kids' creativity.”
Via Nik Peachey, Vicki Moro, MIND Research Institute
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Playing, imagining, reflecting, and sharing are essential in learning. John Dewey would agree.
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Nik Peachey's curator insight, October 12, 3:38 AM

Some nice tips and suggestions.

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The Astonishing Cost of Violence Against Children

The Astonishing Cost of Violence Against Children | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Attempts to quantify the monetary cost of violence against children have led to some attention-grabbing figures, but never to an equation of hurt.

Via malek, Stephania Savva, Ph.D
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
It is not just the violence directed at them. It is also the violence they experience in households filled with violence directed against others.

I learned to understand student behaviour was not all just them being bad. When I met parents, I had many questions about what it might mean to live in that household. What does it cost us over generations? It is not just the financial cost. It is the cost of what happens to those children.
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malek's curator insight, October 10, 7:30 PM

The report suggests that the global cost of violence against children could be anywhere from 2 to 8 percent of the GDP of the world–potentially as high as $7 trillion dollars per year

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Trained to Fail – The Mission – Medium

Trained to Fail – The Mission – Medium | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
The modern American school system does not encompass or define learning, it is a dominant subset of it. Do you want to know why I dislike school? Homework, sure, but more important than that are…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I begin with the idea that schools train. Training is for seals and other circus animals. Humans are capable of learning.

Having said this the richest irony of all is the schools of education which prepare teachers have not changed what that means in a century. We wonder why we cannot retain teachers.
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Understanding Academic Language and its Connection to School Success

Understanding Academic Language and its Connection to School Success | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Proficiency in these skills, otherwise known as academic language, is critical for reading comprehension and overall academic success.
Via Ines Bieler
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Use language that students understand. As they are grounded in that language, increase the complexity.
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29 Motivational Quotes to Get Yourself Charged

29 Motivational Quotes to Get Yourself Charged | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Whatever your goal, you can make it happen. Use these motivational quotes to help you along your journey.

Via Jay, massimo facchinetti, Stefano Principato, Bobby Dillard
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
These are good ones, including Mark Twain, Confucius, and Elanor Roosevelt
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America is slowly sucking the life out of education—starting with its teachers

America is slowly sucking the life out of education—starting with its teachers | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Education pays. According to a new report from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), adults with a college degree are 10 percentage points more likely to be employed, and will earn 56% more on average than adults who only completed the end of high school. They are less likely to suffer from depressio

Via Mark E. Deschaine, PhD, Stephania Savva, Ph.D
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I think this is more universal than one country. Granted Canadian teachers, particulary in Alberta, are well paid. The article is research based and, although I am not a big fan, John Hattie is right in that teachers are essential to learning. Teaching is a profoundly human enterprise.
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Developing Students’ Ability to Give and Take Effective Feedback

Developing Students’ Ability to Give and Take Effective Feedback | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Schools are using a modified version of the Six Thinking Hats technique to teach students how to give effective feedback to one another.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The feedback is based on Edward de Bono's lateral thinking and 6 hats concept. The author notes not to use the concept rigidly and 12 year olds are able to give useful feedback to their peers.
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52 Of The Best Quotes About Learning - TeachThought

52 Of The Best Quotes About Learning - TeachThought | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
So then, the quotes. Below we’ve hand-picked 52 of our favorite quotes about learning. (We’ve already got a follow-up article drafted because there are many we like that didn’t make the cut this time.) We tried to choose from a variety of thinkers, from teachers and writers to poets and farmers to philosophers and entrepreneurs to civil rights leaders and, in a few cases, even politicians.

These quotes necessarily reflect a particular view of learning, so in that way this list is editorialized. At TeachThought, we focus on the human/critical thinking/innovation angle, and the quotes we chose mostly reflect that.

Via John Evans, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD, Miloš Bajčetić, Yashy Tohsaku, Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
This is a long and rich list.
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First Person: What 100 ninth graders told me about why they don’t read

First Person: What 100 ninth graders told me about why they don’t read | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
My students’ answers — cell phone addiction, responsibilities at home, a lack of interest — were honest and illuminating. They’re also helping me figure out how to help.

Via Jennifer Cowley, Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I gave students a few minutes each day to read. They chose what they wanted to read and it seemed over time to help. While they read, I read.
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Teach100 Mentors: Teacher Burnout Causes, Effects, and Remedies - Blog

Teach100 Mentors: Teacher Burnout Causes, Effects, and Remedies - Blog | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Experts are calling it a crisis. The United States is experiencing a national shortage in teachers, with eight percent of educators leaving the field each year. The cause? An exponential rise in teacher burnout.

Via Kelly Christopherson
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Understood as a calling (see Parker Palmer and Thomas Merton), teaching is not about money. Yes, teachers have to make a living. I would link environmental stress with administrative issues. I found little support in my last decade in a K-12 classroom.
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Kelly Christopherson's curator insight, October 14, 12:26 PM
Teacher Burnout is an issue that must be addressed. Mental health issues are important to address for teachers and students. 
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On Learning and Common Sense - Will Richardson

On Learning and Common Sense - Will Richardson | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Rogers' list of 10 learning principles are mostly common sense. The question why is it so difficult for schools to live them?
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Will Richardson summarizes some of Carl Rogers' writing on schooling and learning.

There are some overlapping features with John Dewey i.e. curiosity, problem solving and practical nature.

For me, common sense is about a shared sense and is social. It does not mean we understand things exactly alike. We cannot. The social feature is essential. As well, self-organization is about complexity and chaos theories. The self (identity) is continuously emerging.

An essential point is that students are responsible for their learning. It is not the teacher who learns for them. Nor does the teacher facilitate. Learning, like teaching, is hard.
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Biological Foundations for Self-Directed Education – The Mission – Medium

Biological Foundations for Self-Directed Education – The Mission – Medium | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
In many previous posts I have contended that children come into the world biologically designed to educate themselves. The evidence comes from observing the amazing learning capacities of children…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Being curious, play, being in social settings, and using play to learn from mistakes are the four biological foundations.

It is essential to note that we can self-direct from a young and it is equally important that adults give children/youth space. Having said this, Hannah Arendt said leaving children to their own devices all the time is immoral. I suspect John Dewey would have agreed withe foundations.
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Suspensions Don’t Teach | Restorative practices are a burgeoning alternative to traditional punitive justice 

Suspensions Don’t Teach | Restorative practices are a burgeoning alternative to traditional punitive justice  | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
The world of education is alive with buzzwords like innovation, inclusion, and mindfulness; another term gaining traction is restorative practices, also called restorative justice. Restorative practices are a burgeoning alternative to traditional punitive justice such as suspensions (both in school and out of school) and other exclusionary forms of discipline.

Many states are legislating a movement away from prescribed punitive justice for misbehavior in schools, and restorative practices are gaining in esteem as an evidence-based intervention that has proven successful when implemented correctly. Major school districts in San Francisco, Denver, and Houston are implementing restorative practices to combat inequalities in suspension and disciplinary referrals. These districts are finding that restorative practices, once understood, can be implemented with just a few simple steps.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=Psychology

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2017/06/02/still-following-we-have-always-done-it-this-way-or-already-on-growth-mindset/

 

 


Via Gust MEES
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The students we suspend often do not want to be in school.
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Gust MEES's curator insight, October 12, 8:22 AM
The world of education is alive with buzzwords like innovation, inclusion, and mindfulness; another term gaining traction is restorative practices, also called restorative justice. Restorative practices are a burgeoning alternative to traditional punitive justice such as suspensions (both in school and out of school) and other exclusionary forms of discipline.

Many states are legislating a movement away from prescribed punitive justice for misbehavior in schools, and restorative practices are gaining in esteem as an evidence-based intervention that has proven successful when implemented correctly. Major school districts in San Francisco, Denver, and Houston are implementing restorative practices to combat inequalities in suspension and disciplinary referrals. These districts are finding that restorative practices, once understood, can be implemented with just a few simple steps.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=Psychology

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2017/06/02/still-following-we-have-always-done-it-this-way-or-already-on-growth-mindset/

 

 

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What every teacher should know about ... memory and the brain

What every teacher should know about ... memory and the brain | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
In a new series of articles on how psychology research can inform teaching, Bradley Busch picks an academic study – and makes sense of it for the classroom. This time: a project on long-term memory

Via iPamba
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
This is a research based article. Teachers need to have some idea of how the brain functions and how we create and recall memories.
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8 Inspirational Quotes for Teachers From History's Greatest Educators

8 Inspirational Quotes for Teachers From History's Greatest Educators | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
In the spirit of previous posts, here is a new set of inspirational quotes for teachers. These come from some of the greatest educators in our history.

Via Stephania Savva, Ph.D, Sarantis Chelmis
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
John Dewey is missing and he is a treasure trove of great quotes.
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