Education, Curiosity, and Happiness
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Why Women Collaborate, Men Work Alone, And Everybody's Angry

Why Women Collaborate, Men Work Alone, And Everybody's Angry | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
At the intersection of selfishness and team structure is an interesting lesson about gender.

Via donhornsby
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

It is an interesting point about the inverse relationship between collaboration and women's pay. Perhaps, the demand for collaboration is part of the myth we build around organizations?

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donhornsby's curator insight, October 24, 2013 9:16 AM

(From the article): So if compensation is clearly oriented toward the team, then men will jump at the chance to work more closely with their colleagues. This shows how something as simple as organizational structures--which are easy to leave unexamined--shape the behavior of the people in them. Which is why, perhaps, we should take an update from Yammer, the enterprise social network, and start iterating the way we construct our companies.

donhornsby's curator insight, October 24, 2013 9:17 AM

(From the article): So if compensation is clearly oriented toward the team, then men will jump at the chance to work more closely with their colleagues. This shows how something as simple as organizational structures--which are easy to leave unexamined--shape the behavior of the people in them. Which is why, perhaps, we should take an update from Yammer, the enterprise social network, and start iterating the way we construct our companies.

Doris Palomino's curator insight, October 24, 2013 6:02 PM

"In short, men tend to overestimate their abilities and downplay those of their coworkers, while women shortchange their skills and defer to their peers".

Education, Curiosity, and Happiness
What roles can curiosity and happiness play in learning?
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Tobacco and Patchouli: Writing about Teaching

Tobacco and Patchouli: Writing about Teaching | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
To teach, we must believe in the potential of each person in the room. Unwaveringly. This is not to say we don’t get to have our bad days, our off days, the days when we really can’t stand to talk to another student or plan another lesson. But it does mean that we teach for a reason, and that reason lies in what lies in the heart of a student. What lay in our hearts when we were students. Hope despair melancholy desire passion hunger confusion. All the things it takes to learn to walk. All the things it takes to learn to do anything. All the things it takes to live in Los Angeles, or to love someone who is hard to love.

Via Kim Flintoff
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
This is a great example of what the currere method can look like. How does this teacher understand his teaching and the need for generosity. David Jardine drew on Emmanuel Levinas to write about teaching as a gift that expects nothing in return.
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Liberal Learning as Conversation

Liberal Learning as Conversation | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
By John B. Bennett The values of liberal learning can be represented by the values that mark conversation: participation, engagement, openness to others.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I would add Hans-Georg Gadamer and David Bohm to the references, but this is a great article. Conversation and dialogue are different than discussion and debate. This can be used with care in K-12 school settings with teachers and students.
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Silicon Valley executives are hiring philosophers to teach them to question everything

Silicon Valley executives are hiring philosophers to teach them to question everything | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Silicon Valley is obsessed with happiness. The pursuit of a mythical good life, achievement blending perfectly with fulfillment, has given rise to the quantified self movement, polyphasic sleeping, and stashes of off-label pharmaceuticals in developers’ desks. Yet Andrew Taggart thinks most of this is nonsense. A PhD in philosophy, Taggart practices the art of gadfly-for-hire

Via L. García Aretio, juandoming
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
This has potenitial. I attended a weekend on philosophy in the classroom and critical thinking is largely shaped by classic and contemporary philosophy, but not to be confused with Socratic circles. These questions can take the form of what Gadamer called "eloquent questions," which help form the space for dialogue without certain answers.
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Follow-up to ‘Why School Makes Us Stupid”.

Follow-up to ‘Why School Makes Us Stupid”. | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
A TREEHORN FOLLOW-UP If you missed the clip of the young man's rant, here is a transcript. Yes. We call it TESTUCATION. He calls it REGURGITATION. Would you really call it EDUCATION? NAPLAN soon for Australia! That fixes everything! We flopped last year because the kids don't like it. What do we do now? We…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
For the most part, I agree with what Cathcart says. He conflates educating and schooling as the same thing and that is fundamentally incorrect. Schooling is a formal process and educating happens 24/7. To educate is to lead somone. School was supposed to be a place of leisure for good conversations about challenging topics. It might have been intended to prepare students for the future, but it happened in the moment with skills being learned and modelled.
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Rethinking My Exams

Rethinking My Exams | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
For many academics, our exams are one of those areas of teaching that remain unchanged and unexamined.

Via Peter Mellow, Monica S Mcfeeters
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I stopped giving exams several years into teaching. I still used quizzes to guage progress, but focused on projects and activities that students demonstrated an understanding of what they were learning. It gave them opportunties to learn together and I focused on teaching in the course of the process. An art teacher told me she gave tests early in her career so students would take art more seriously. I taught a little art, but would not have known how to test. Art was not a strength. Instead, I participated and did the art projects with students, learning alongside them.
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It’s Time To Treat Homework Like Any Other Lesson - by Paul Moss

It’s Time To Treat Homework Like Any Other Lesson - by Paul Moss | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
by Paul Moss

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
If a lesson and, by extension homework, has value, students will want to do it. As well, homework has to be something they can do and their parents can help with if needed.
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How Empathy Is Important For Parents And Teens When Things Get Stressful

How Empathy Is Important For Parents And Teens When Things Get Stressful | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Helping teenagers develop cognitive empathy, the ability to understand another person's perspective, can allow them to cope with stress better. But whether they
Via Vicki Moro
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Adults who can remember what it was like to experience being an adolescent might be able to relate with their children and students experiencing that time in their lives. For adults, currere is about the subjective experiences and how they felt as students and growing up in ways that can inform parenting and teaching
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Why I Stopped Giving Trigger Warnings in Class – Bright

Why I Stopped Giving Trigger Warnings in Class – Bright | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
I gave trigger warnings in my classroom. I never thought about whether they were necessary, or exactly what being triggered meant. I knew that I wanted to be respectful of students’ feelings and that…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I think it is essential to prepare students for the real possibility they will find a topic uncomfortable. What that means varies depending on the age and maturity of students. Within reason, we have to listen to others who have differing views of the world. Notice, I didn't say opinions. Maybe, a way to begin this dialogue is for teachers to talk about what is uncomfortable for them. We are often apt to walk out, attack, retreat, etc.
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Brains, Brains, Brains! How the Mind of a Middle Schooler Works

Brains, Brains, Brains! How the Mind of a Middle Schooler Works | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Blogger Heather Wolpert-Gawron launches this three-part series by advising middle school teachers to read up on brain research which will give insight on how the 'tween brain works.
Via Cindy Riley Klages
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Good research can be helpful for teachers to draw on and inform their teaching.
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Redefining Failure in the classroom by Ben Johnson

Redefining Failure in the classroom by Ben Johnson | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Why encouraging students to get everything right is the wrong direction.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
"Why encouraging students to get everything right is the wrong direction." It is. When we did not get the right answers, I asked students what might have happened to lead to the "failure?" Having students and teachers explore those questions can be quite fruitful.
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Dr. Theresa Kauffman's curator insight, April 23, 9:46 PM
A very interesting twist on the growth mindset. What do you think?
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Be So Prolific, They Can’t Ignore You – The Mission – Medium

Be So Prolific, They Can’t Ignore You – The Mission – Medium | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Creativity is a central source of meaning in our lives. The world needs more creators, not consumers. We have come this far because a few bold innovators and creators chose to create, build, make, do…

Via malek
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The focus is on creativity and teaching. The essence of teaching is to learn. What do I need to know to teach this?
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malek's curator insight, April 17, 7:29 PM

Is being prolific a requirement for being creative? No, not at all. Many great writers and artists create their master works, and then are done. Others, are more prolific.

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The Principles of Adult Learning Theory 

The Principles of Adult Learning Theory  | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
It has long been understood that adults learn differently from children, and from students of traditional university age. With the recent shift toward continuous education and adult learning, especially in the professional sphere, it has become necessary to quantify these differences more closely.

Instructional design’ is a science-based field that synthesizes pedagogical realities and the neurological facts of learning. Although it can be applied to any learning community, the field has attained widespread recognition due to its role in adult-focused pedagogy.

It builds on and implements existing theories of adult learning in modern, effective ways.

Via Carlos Fosca, Dennis Swender, Ines Bieler
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
"As a general rule, adults need to be involved in planning their instruction and evaluating their results. They should be provided with an environment in which mistakes are safe, expected and a basis for continued learning, in keeping with a problem-centered approach to new ideas."

Those creating and implementing educational policy might want to read this article. Teachers can play a vital role in their own learning.
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Carlos Fosca's curator insight, April 17, 9:15 AM

Es bien sabido que los adultos aprendemos de manera diferente que los niños y que incluso los estudiantes universitarios tradicionales. Sin embargo, también es sabido que poco o nada se hace en la mayoría de programas de educación continua para cambiar la estrategia pedagógica del aula universitaria y por ello, una clase para adultos se diferencia poco de una clase tradicional que se ofrece a jóvenes estudiantes de pregrado o incluso de posgrado. La única diferencia radica en que los estudiantes adultos, en este caso, son los que obligan a cambiar la estrategia, cuando introducen preguntas prácticas en clase. El profesor debería planificar su curso y sus clases de una manera diferente, mucho más enfocado a la solución de problemas y a un aprendizaje muy contextualizado, promoviendo el debate y el aprendizaje entre pares. El resto lo ponen los estudiantes que pueden contribuir al aprendizaje de sus compañeros tanto o más que el profesor mismo.

Margarita Saucedo's curator insight, April 21, 10:51 AM
Andragogía: toma este ámbito de conocimiento
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Competency-Based Education - Foundation for Excellence in Education (U.S.) - Is there a path for Ontario?

Competency-Based Education - Foundation for Excellence in Education (U.S.) - Is there a path for Ontario? | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Every student has unique talents and abilities, and every student deserves an education that adapts to their needs rather than requiring conformity to an outdated model of education. Our nation’s goals and expectations for all students have risen. The conventional, one-size-fits-all system of education must evolve and adapt to meet the individual needs of each …

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
What if we placed subjects in the middle? Could we get to a good place? What does mastery mean?
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Margarita Saucedo's curator insight, April 20, 11:25 AM
EBC: un reto su implementación
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The Strange Way Being “Good” Hurts Your Willpower

The Strange Way Being “Good” Hurts Your Willpower | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
When reflecting on the future self, the brain’s activation is identical to when it is considering the traits of another person,” writes Kelly McGonigal in The Willpower Instinct, a book that has helped me change the way I see and move toward my goals. So the Paulette of Next Year can feel like another kind of authority figure, someone trying to make me do something I don’t want to do today.
When I screw myself over, by getting in debt, being hungover, or procrastinating on my work until it becomes a flurry of panic typing, I rail against this person inside. “You’re the worst!” I tell myself.
According to McGonigal, I’m going about this all wrong. Firstly, she says, berating yourself for being “bad,” is only more likely to keep you from acting in the way you want to act. Guilt is a stressor, firstly, and stress weakens your willpower.
Secondly, by moralizing my behavior, labeling it as “good” or “bad,” I’m opening myself up to the risk of moral licensing.

Via David Hain
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
This is an interesting article.
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David Hain's curator insight, Today, 5:59 AM

Why we need top learn to re-frame that inner voice...!

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Why Leaders Think They're Evolving When They're Not

Why Leaders Think They're Evolving When They're Not | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Most businesses have stripped employees of their identities, leading to a leadership identity crisis that infects businesses across America and prevents innovation and initiative. Leaders must encourage employees to passionately go above and beyond.

Via donhornsby
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
"The problem is that most businesses have stripped employees of their identities...."

Insert the word teachers for employees and schools for businesses and you have the essence of my dissertation. How does each teacher inform their particular identity in a sea of constraints? That is a question premised on a Judith Butler quote.
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donhornsby's curator insight, Today, 10:26 AM
Only when you are being your most authentic self, sharing it and consistently living it every day, can you evolve into the inclusive leader most businesses and America needs.
 
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Being treehorned. School sucks.

Being treehorned. School sucks. | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
School Sucks. It Makes Kids Stupid. I'm so pleased that I chose the name TREEHORN as the title to the occasional papers that I used to send to like-minded friends. It's been so prophetic.  He started life as the hero of The Shrinking of Treehorn  by Florence Parry Heide. No adult, even his closest relatives…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
We should always ask what school is for and is it meeting those objectives. School is not just about preparing children for the workplace, although it has become that in many ways. We need to step away from the neo-liberal agenda that permeates schools and make it a space where children and adults enjoy going to.
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Writing and Teaching Writing: By Topics

Writing and Teaching Writing: By Topics | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
One aspect of blogging that is a recurring pleasant surprise is when an older posts pops up in the daily stats; someone has discovered and shared, and then, it resonates, often in a way it did not when I originally posted it. Since my primary focus as an educator has been writing, I have accumulated…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I am not sure what the label means, but the links to resources are extensive. It will take time to go through each of them.
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Five Ways Humor Boosts Creative Thinking and Problem-Solving in the Classroom

Five Ways Humor Boosts Creative Thinking and Problem-Solving in the Classroom | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
When we think about creativity and innovation, the words “humor” and “goofiness” don’t typically come to mind. But I’d argue that this is a critical piece of what it means to cultivate a climate of…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Humor cannot be overstated. Each teacher has to find what works for them, but discovering one's humor is essential. I floundered in my first teaching assignment, until I used humor that fit who I was. The students saw me differently.
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Why Believing in Your Students Matters

Why Believing in Your Students Matters | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
When I hear statements from educators like: “I have the worst class I’ve had in years,” “These kids can’t do it” or “They don’t want to learn” my heart breaks for the students in their classes and in their schools. I know teaching is complex. The work is hard and seemingly never ending. I will…
Via Vicki Moro
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I remember a hug and the kind words a junior high teacher shared with me. It makes all the difference. Differences make a difference. This is the currere method informing who we are as teachers and our teaching.
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Helping Students Find Their Writer’s Voice

Helping Students Find Their Writer’s Voice | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Three exercises to get students writing with vivid detail—a key step to developing a distinctive style of their own.

Via Elke Höfler
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Sam Intrator described how a teacher he observed had students write about a small plot of grass about one square foot. The students did not want to, but, when they did, Intrator said the results were incredible. Students became attentive to small details that usually escaped their attention i.e. bugs.
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Why I write? And you should too. – The Mission – Medium

Why I write? And you should too. – The Mission – Medium | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
My relationship with writing is complicated. I used to write regularly. On startups and life lessons. That was two years back. And then I gave up. Other works got into the way. I told myself that I…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I try spending time each day writing. Some of it is cursive writing in a journal and other aspects are digital i.e. blogging. I discovered in my reseach that the teachers I interviewed reflected a great deal, but spent little time writing. The article raises good points. For me, the least important is creating a network. If it happens, it happens and it does.
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Teaching a Class With Big Ability Differences

Teaching a Class With Big Ability Differences | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Techniques for meeting the needs of students with diverse abilities and interests.
Via Cindy Riley Klages
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Providing choice can be great for students. They begin to take responsiblity for their learning. What works for each of them. "Differences make a difference." Good teachers understand this and still teach
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Where Good Ideas Come From & How Your Classroom Can Respond

Where Good Ideas Come From & How Your Classroom Can Respond | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Steven Johnson discusses where good ideas come from, and TeachThought offers takeaways for teachers.

Via EDTECH@UTRGV, juandoming
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
For me, the key take away was not to get to caught up in the packaged curriculum and policy i.e. using computers. How do the experiences of students and their problems help a teacher? How does a teacher's lived-experiences, their own curriculum, inform them and their teaching
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Karen Bonanno's curator insight, April 23, 6:26 PM

Make them short, sharp and shiny. 

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10 Challenges That Every First-Time Manager Will Face

10 Challenges That Every First-Time Manager Will Face | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
“ Being a first-time manager is tough. Here are 10 challenges that first-time managers are likely to experience and what they can do to get through them.”
Via Ariana Amorim, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD, Vicki Moro
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
One of the challenges that is missed is asking for support from people who work for you. In teaching, school managers are teachers themselves. It seems reasonable that other teachers can help.
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Workplace Bullying: An Act of War Threatening the Health and Safety of Your Employees

Workplace Bullying: An Act of War Threatening the Health and Safety of Your Employees | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Bullying can have a serious impact on health and safety in your workplace. Learn more about its effects and how to identify bullying behavior.

Via george_reed
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
When I was teaching, I experienced and witnessed considerable workplace bullying. It seemed to be the good-to tactic for administrators and teachers. Do we keep good teachers in the fold?
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george_reed's curator insight, April 20, 12:47 PM
"Moreover, 72% of employers deny, discount, encourage, rationalize, or defend the bullying behavior." Don't fight the war with a toxic boss unless you know you can win.