Education, Curiosity, and Happiness
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What Happened to Employee Loyalty?

What Happened to Employee Loyalty? | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
I wrote a Q & A column advising a guy who was conflicted about his work obligations versus his commitments at home.This fellow's job put him in situations where on a moment's notice, he'd have to

Via Danielle M. Villegas, Amy Ragsdale
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

A look at the research tells us that in the early 1980's companies began downsizing. This is a chicken and egg scenario. What loyalty disappeared first: employer or employee?

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Danielle M. Villegas's curator insight, September 18, 2013 12:32 PM

I could relate to this article too well. Having been a consultant or temp for the past five years, and not being able to find permanent work vs. contract work, the same still applies very often. The same expectations are made to do your duties and perform as if you are an employee, yet you don't even get the same benefits or treatment. Some would argue that some consultants make a lot of money, so they can afford to get their own benefits, but I have yet to find that to be true. In two out of three cases of my own, I was actually underpaid by half. But the treatment--even as someone who is technically a non-employee--is the same. We just have even more on the line, at least based on my own experiences. Sometimes we have good experiences, and sometimes we have not so good. Consultants/temps are always on the bottom of the totem pole, as it is. We put in the same work, but given less credit very often. Not always, but usually.  

This is definitely a must-read. It's a dynamic that all companies have to work on getting the right balance.

--techcommgeekmom 

John Michel's curator insight, September 18, 2013 1:54 PM

It isn't difficult to earn the loyalty of our team members. We only need to be loyal, back.

Education, Curiosity, and Happiness
What roles can curiosity and happiness play in learning?
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Fall Reading on Education

Fall Reading on Education | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
The book came out—These Schools Belong to You and Me: Beacon Press—and so I have been busy promoting it on the east coast.  But it reminds me of how much writers are anxious—and not just for moneta…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Deb Meier is a hero of mine. The list is short but includes a book about being addicted to school reform and another by Sonia Nieto.
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The best way to teach: Teacher-directed vs. Student-led. Results will surprise you.

The best way to teach: Teacher-directed vs. Student-led. Results will surprise you. | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

"There is a long-standing, red-hot debate in educational circles about the most effective way to teach kids. 


Some favor more traditional teacher-directed methods, with the teacher presenting materials and responding to questions about it. Others advocate for inquiry-based learning—where students drive their own learning through discovery and exploration, working with peers and developing their own ideas—arguing it results in deeper, and more meaningful learning. 


The two are sometimes pitted against each other as “sage on a stage” (teacher directed) vs. “guide on the side” (student-led, or inquiry based). Both cite ample evidence to prove the superiority of their method (see here for teacher-directed, and here for inquiry-based). 


McKinsey applied machine learning to the world’s largest student database to try and come up with a more scientific answer. 


The bottom line: A mixture of the two methods is best, but between the two, teacher-directed came out stronger. 


In all five regions of the world, scores were generally higher when teachers took the lead. “The more frequently teacher-directed happens, the better students do,” said Marc Krawitz, an associate partner at McKinsey. Conversely, “Student outcomes tend to decline with inquiry-based, as it is increased in isolation.”"


Via Mel Riddile, Nevermore Sithole, iPamba
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
John Dewey argued that traditional/progressive and child-centred/teacher-centered are false dichotomies. The research here points to something like that as well. Teachers teach and are responsible for that element. Students have to grow and become responsible for their learning.
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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 19, 3:08 AM
The best way to teach: Teacher-directed vs. Student-led. Results will surprise you.
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Education Update:10 Ways to Get Your Mojo Back:10 Ways to Get Your Mojo Back

Education Update:10 Ways to Get Your Mojo Back:10 Ways to Get Your Mojo Back | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
At some point in the school year, teachers struggle. These are some ways to get back on track and rejuvenate one's self.

I like pause and reflect and keeping the flame going. Teachers should reflect. Take time, reflect on your experiences, and write them down. This should be an ongoing process i.e a journal. Keeping the flame going can part of this. What brought me into teaching? Why not write that question down at the top of the page each day.
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5 school-improvement tips for civic and community leaders

5 school-improvement tips for civic and community leaders | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
I was down in Shreveport, Louisiana, last week to talk school improvement. I had a chance to visit with the usual mix of thoughtful business, civic, philanthropic, political, and educational leaders…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Point 4 is near and dear to my heart. Include those closest to the action, teachers, parents, and students, who are quite often left out.

We have a consultancy class that just leads around in circles. The result is school deform, rather than transforming schools.
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Learn Like Leonardo da Vinci – The Mission – Medium

Learn Like Leonardo da Vinci – The Mission – Medium | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
It’s hard to talk about accelerated learning without mentioning the impressive genius of Leonardo da Vinci. He was a master artist, anatomist, engineer, scientist, biologist, and experimenter. What…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Learning like Leonardo da Vinci includes learning across disciplines, being curious and asking questions, exploring, be patient and experiment, and record your observations, thoughts, and experiences.

Something to note is that genius, a word used to describe da Vinci, etymologically means love of place and people.
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How To Become a Good Writer: 50 Quotes From The Greats

How To Become a Good Writer: 50 Quotes From The Greats | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
“I think every fiction writer, to a certain extent, is a schizophrenic and able to have two or three or five voices in his or her body. We seek, through our profession, to get those voices onto paper.” ~ Ridley Pearson

Via Penelope
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The list is broken into categories i.e. inspiration, characters, craft, etc.
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Penelope's curator insight, August 29, 12:27 PM
Quotes can be instant inspiration. There are some very unique ones in this article. I like #12. What's your favorite?

“I think every fiction writer, to a certain extent, is a schizophrenic and able to have two or three or five voices in his or her body. We seek, through our profession, to get those voices onto paper.” ~ Ridley Pearson

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***
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Is Homework Helping Students Learn?

Is Homework Helping Students Learn? | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Practice, or reinforcement of a skill, is part of the educational process. Practice in classwork and homework is an important part of guaranteeing students are learning what is being taught. Skilled, targeted practice is what is planned but the art of practice is both complex and simple. 

In sports, theatre, and music programs, a model for how to develop expertise lives right in front of us. To acquire a skill, practice is necessary. Yet, when practice is unsupervised and lacks immediate feedback, frustration can arise, motivation can wane, and bad form can be embedded. Learning is either limited or non-existent without the practice feedback loop ongoing.  In sports, a targeted skill is focused on and the coach gives consistent feedback as the player practices that one skill. In the arts the same is true. Skills are identified, modeled, and the students or players or actors, or musicians are given feedback on the skill(s) identified so that practice becomes both targeted and informed. Feedback is key. Encouragement is essential.

Via Mel Riddile, Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I assigned ver lyittle homework. When I did, it had to be meaningful and the students had to be able to complete it. Quite often, the homework was a project they could do at home and I sent a note/email home letting parents know what was happening. I also checked with my students daily to make sure we were making progress and to help.
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A Survey of Grown Unschoolers: Overview of Findings

A Survey of Grown Unschoolers: Overview of Findings | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
In a study that preceded the one to be described here, my colleague Gina Riley and I surveyed parents in unschooling families — that is, in families where the children did not go to school and were…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Unschooling, like home-schooling, is schooling, albeit a different form. The students do not go to school, but learn and are taught. Although I do not want to generalize there is more choice available for students and parents in unschooling and home schooling.

Deb Meier in an interview said home schoolers were some of the most respectful students she taught.
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The Effect of High School Socioeconomic, Racial, and Linguistic Segregation on Academic Performance and School Behaviors

The Effect of High School Socioeconomic, Racial, and Linguistic Segregation on Academic Performance and School Behaviors | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Content and resources for the education researcher
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Although the research and article are American, I think it raises questions in Canada, as well. One teacher described teaching in a school where 90% of the students were non-Caucasian and how it was uncomfortable.
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Beware of Hype Over Grade Inflation, Educators and Other Experts Warn

Beware of Hype Over Grade Inflation, Educators and Other Experts Warn | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

"A College Board study that says grade inflation is rampant in high schools could be used as an argument for more standardized testing."


Via WEAC
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
There have been universities that admitted students based on portfolios i.e. Harvard. I used rubrics, which are not grade-based. Rubrics are a feedback tool that helps teachers and students understand progress being made. I fussed over my rubrics each time I used them, making changes to better capture progress and not just a one-time event such as a grade.
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Take Notes by Hand for Better Long-Term Comprehension

Take Notes by Hand for Better Long-Term Comprehension | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Data suggest that taking notes by hand beats typing notes on a laptop for remembering conceptual information over time.

Via Les Howard, Luciana Viter
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
It is not only effective for long-term comprehension and retention. There are other benefits. Writing is a right brain activity as we usually are taking short cuts in notes. Keyboarding is a left brain activity. A conversation engages both hemispheres.


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Penelope's curator insight, October 18, 11:37 AM
I've read about many a famous author who writes first drafts in longhand on yellow legal pads. Personally, I like the feel of writing with pen and paper, then transcribing into a Word document. This process seems to fully engage the creative brain.

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***
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Boost Student Engagement and Effort in 6 Simple Steps | Brain Based Learning | Brain Based Teaching | Articles From Jensen Learning

Boost Student Engagement and Effort in 6 Simple Steps | Brain Based Learning | Brain Based Teaching | Articles From Jensen Learning | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
You may not have big challenges getting your students to work hard in school, but many of your colleagues DO have a tough time. At least that’s what they tell me! This is the first of a 4-part series on the real “how to” for student engagement and effort. The first six steps you should know […]

Via Mark E. Deschaine, PhD, Bobby Dillard
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The article points us towards research about relating to students, giving them choice (I think this leads to student responsibility), appreciative inquiry (this is a great way of questioning), etc.

Valuing who students are, their experiences, and their traditions are essential to teachers engaging students in their learning.
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The non-western books that every student should read

The non-western books that every student should read | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Leading authors pick international classics that should be on every students’ bookshelves, but are often neglected by universities

Via iPamba
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
These books would be for high school and beyond. Some of them might prove challenging for high school i.e. Frantz Fanon. They will shake people in ways that will make them think.

An author I might add is bell hooks. I recall the first time I read her work I struggled, feeling attacked as a male. With time, I grew to appreciate that part of her books.
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Education Readings October 20th

Education Readings October 20th | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
By Allan Alach News flash: The new government in New Zealand means that the previous government’s National Standards & associated policies (our version of GERM) will be no more. Sanity is…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Two links that caught my eye were we should let children dawdle and dream. The second one was about daydreaming being essential to learning.
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Building a Community of Learners—and Citizens

Building a Community of Learners—and Citizens | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
A high-needs school in Rhode Island helps close the achievement gap while preparing students for active citizenship.

Via Ove Christensen
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
We do not build community, citizens (they are people), and inclusion. Those form around what we hold in common: our humanity. Divesity, even in homogenous appearing groups, is essential to community.
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Do You Have an Idea Garden? – The Mission – Medium

Do You Have an Idea Garden? – The Mission – Medium | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Where do you plant your idea seeds? How do you give those idea seeds the love and attention they need to become your next great idea? From my experience, most people have the hardest time at the…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
As I read the article, I wondered how I could use an idea garden for other parts of life i.e. teaching, research, reading, etc?
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What Education Ought to Provide Young People – The Mission – Medium

What Education Ought to Provide Young People – The Mission – Medium | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
There are practically as many philosophies of education as there are schools in the United States. There are the Prusso-American schools of Horace Mann’s age, the public schools of the No Child Left…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The Ivan Illich quote is one that makes me stop and think. It does not fit with a concept such as accelerated learning. In fact, that oxymoronic term reduces learning to an instrumental understanding.

Illich says school learning, as it is done, assumes revealing of secrets in an orderly manner from an expert source. Living and learning are exploring mysteries in ways that defy that thinking. I watch a young child at play and witness the time they spend whiling over the worth of their learning in ways that reveal mysteries in anything but an orderly way.

Accelerated learning is the next in a long, sorry list of ways to reform school in ways that deform learning. We want to transform schools into places where we can live the mysteries of living and learning more fully.
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Dodge Ball and Relay Races at Recess are Curbing Bullying at Some Schools

Dodge Ball and Relay Races at Recess are Curbing Bullying at Some Schools | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
NYC schools with structured recess are reporting less aggressive behaviors, studies found.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Although structured time can be useful, unstructured play is essential to children learning. Finding how to integrate these two is a key for teachers, parents, and others.
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How Thinking Works: 10 Brilliant Cognitive Psychology Studies Everyone Should Know - PsyBlog

How Thinking Works: 10 Brilliant Cognitive Psychology Studies Everyone Should Know - PsyBlog | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
How experts think, the power of framing, the miracle of attention, the weird world of cognitive biases and more...

Via John Lasschuit ®™
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
There is interesting research.
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John Lasschuit ®™'s curator insight, March 24, 2015 2:44 PM

 Interesting. #Brain science

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Hayek and Camus Walk Into a School – The Mission – Medium

Hayek and Camus Walk Into a School – The Mission – Medium | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
There are practically as many philosophies of education as there are schools in the United States. There are the Prusso-American schools of Horace Mann’s age, the public schools of the No Child Left…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
F. A. Hayek made two essential points. First, school curriculum should not be centrally planned. Second, pedagogic humility and responsibility is vital for teachers as they are understood as autonomous professionals.

Albert Camus contributed the essential idea that each human being crafts meaning for their particular life as they explore the world, including school.

I think John Dewey and Alfred North Whitehead would have agreed with them. Teachers are learners in these views.
 
Contemporary educators who subscribe to treating teachers as responsible and autonomouns professionals are William Pinar, Gert Biesta, and Maxine Greene.
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TEACHER VOICE: In Finland, it’s easier to become a doctor or lawyer than a teacher — Here’s why - The Hechinger Report

TEACHER VOICE: In Finland, it’s easier to become a doctor or lawyer than a teacher — Here’s why - The Hechinger Report | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
In Finland, teachers are trusted, appreciated and educated in advanced degree programs. Becoming and being a teacher starts with earning a placement at one of the country’s highly selective teacher education programs. I vividly recall the two educational books I was required to study for the first part of Finland’s initial classroom teacher education entrance …
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
"In Finland, teachers are trusted, appreciated and educated in advanced degree programs. Becoming and being a teacher starts with earning a placement at one of the country’s highly selective teacher education programs."

Perhaps if we begin from the premise that trusting, appreciating, and educating teachers is a great starting point we will attract and retain teachers.
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The tao of the Three Little Pigs - The Writer

The tao of the Three Little Pigs - The Writer | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Take heart from the Three Little Pigs: Don’t let an inner critic huff, puff, and blow your work down.

Via Penelope
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I could have used this in my teaching. I used Fractured Fairytales to explore writing and its elements. What surprised me was how little experience some students had with fairytales and satire.
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Penelope's curator insight, October 17, 11:35 AM
You'll love the metaphor of the "Three Little Pigs" children's story to your inner critic. Yes, he/she will huff and puff, but don't let it blow your house down! You keep on writing no matter the obstacles. 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***
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How to use the new 70:20:10 rule for knowledge sharing

How to use the new 70:20:10 rule for knowledge sharing | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
I discovered a new rule for knowledge sharing, the 70:20:10 rule. In any given company 10% of the employees is willing to actively share their knowledge. About 20% of the employees is willing to share knowledge if they are invited, and 70% will not share knowledge at all, they are just consumers. This is something…

Via Marta Torán, Dennis Swender, Ines Bieler
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Teaching students to share is essential. It is how we set up our classrooms. I used tables and this offered students opportunities to share with each other.
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Marta Torán's curator insight, February 10, 3:30 PM

La regla 70:20:10 sobre cómo se comparte el conocimiento en las organizaciones.


El 10% comparte el conocimiento de manera activa - "El voluntario"


El 20% necesita un empujón. Comparten el conocimiento si son invitados - "El capaz"


El 70% se limita a consumir el conocimiento generado por otros -  "El perezoso"


 


Gran explicación de Kasper Spiro

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, February 14, 2:44 AM
How to use the new 70:20:10 rule for knowledge sharing
Daniel Tremblay's curator insight, March 8, 8:07 AM
70:20:10 ...

10% des employés sont disposés à partager leur connaissance.

20% des employés vont interagir avec le premier 10%; donner leurs commentaires, bonifier, etc...

70% vont consommer le contenu sans interagir.

Les chiffres ne sont peut-être pas totalement exacts mais ça donne un ordre de grandeur quand on parle de partage de connaissance.  Il me semble que ça correspond pas mal à mon expérience dans quelques organisations ...

L'auteur, dans un autre article ( https://kasperspiro.com/2016/09/13/702010-and-user-generated-learning-no-way/ ) présente les objections les plus souvent utilisées pour ne pas adopter des stratégies de partage de connaissance et tente d'argumenter ...  Un peu "pitch de vente" mais on se reconnaît quand même dans les objections formulées.
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The integrated curriculum, university teacher identity and teaching culture: the effects of an interdisciplinary activity | Alonso Sáez | Journal of New Approaches in Educational Research

The integrated curriculum, university teacher identity and teaching culture: the effects of an interdisciplinary activity | Alonso Sáez | Journal of New Approaches in Educational Research | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
The integrated curriculum, university teacher identity and teaching culture: the effects of an interdisciplinary activity

Via Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I taught three grades and three core subjects. I integrated the curricula on a regular basis. As an advocate of John Dewey, I also let students use their personal experiences to guide their learning in these situations.

An integrated curriculum overlaps with William Pinar and Madeline Grumet's work with the method of currere. As Dewey would likely argue, school and life are not separte. They are integrated.
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Coaching the Veteran Teacher

Coaching the Veteran Teacher | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Guiding teachers who have years of experience takes sensitivity and a willingness to learn from them at the same time.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I think there are several things lacking in teacher retention, which includes support of veteran teachers. First is isolation. Teachers need to gather, plan together, and teach classes together. I was fortunate. I taught in an environment that gave me opportunities to do this for over a decade. Second is the idea that we need coaches and external experts to sort this out for us. Too often that is just an echo chamber approach that is amplifying the last best idea as if there is one. Each teacher's wisdom counts for something.
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