Education, Curiosity, and Happiness
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Leadership Uses All the Colors

Leadership Uses All the Colors | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Some people, and some organizations, believe that leadership is monochromatic. They act as though leadership comes in one size, one color, one version. There is a right way to lead, and there are n...

Via Elysian Training, Bobby Dillard, Jenny Ebermann
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

True leadership is about the hues and shades that exist. Managment sees in black and white.

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Jenny Ebermann's curator insight, July 10, 2013 10:19 AM

Which colour are you?

Education, Curiosity, and Happiness
What roles can curiosity and happiness play in learning?
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It’s Time To Treat Homework Like Any Other Lesson - by Paul Moss

It’s Time To Treat Homework Like Any Other Lesson - by Paul Moss | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
by Paul Moss

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
If a lesson and, by extension homework, has value, students will want to do it. As well, homework has to be something they can do and their parents can help with if needed.
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How Empathy Is Important For Parents And Teens When Things Get Stressful

How Empathy Is Important For Parents And Teens When Things Get Stressful | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Helping teenagers develop cognitive empathy, the ability to understand another person's perspective, can allow them to cope with stress better. But whether they
Via Vicki Moro
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Adults who can remember what it was like to experience being an adolescent might be able to relate with their children and students experiencing that time in their lives. For adults, currere is about the subjective experiences and how they felt as students and growing up in ways that can inform parenting and teaching
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Why I Stopped Giving Trigger Warnings in Class – Bright

Why I Stopped Giving Trigger Warnings in Class – Bright | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
I gave trigger warnings in my classroom. I never thought about whether they were necessary, or exactly what being triggered meant. I knew that I wanted to be respectful of students’ feelings and that…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I think it is essential to prepare students for the real possibility they will find a topic uncomfortable. What that means varies depending on the age and maturity of students. Within reason, we have to listen to others who have differing views of the world. Notice, I didn't say opinions. Maybe, a way to begin this dialogue is for teachers to talk about what is uncomfortable for them. We are often apt to walk out, attack, retreat, etc.
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Brains, Brains, Brains! How the Mind of a Middle Schooler Works

Brains, Brains, Brains! How the Mind of a Middle Schooler Works | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Blogger Heather Wolpert-Gawron launches this three-part series by advising middle school teachers to read up on brain research which will give insight on how the 'tween brain works.
Via Cindy Riley Klages
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Good research can be helpful for teachers to draw on and inform their teaching.
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Redefining Failure in the classroom by Ben Johnson

Redefining Failure in the classroom by Ben Johnson | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Why encouraging students to get everything right is the wrong direction.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
"Why encouraging students to get everything right is the wrong direction." It is. When we did not get the right answers, I asked students what might have happened to lead to the "failure?" Having students and teachers explore those questions can be quite fruitful.
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Dr. Theresa Kauffman's curator insight, Today, 9:46 PM
A very interesting twist on the growth mindset. What do you think?
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Be So Prolific, They Can’t Ignore You – The Mission – Medium

Be So Prolific, They Can’t Ignore You – The Mission – Medium | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Creativity is a central source of meaning in our lives. The world needs more creators, not consumers. We have come this far because a few bold innovators and creators chose to create, build, make, do…

Via malek
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The focus is on creativity and teaching. The essence of teaching is to learn. What do I need to know to teach this?
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malek's curator insight, April 17, 7:29 PM

Is being prolific a requirement for being creative? No, not at all. Many great writers and artists create their master works, and then are done. Others, are more prolific.

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The Principles of Adult Learning Theory 

The Principles of Adult Learning Theory  | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
It has long been understood that adults learn differently from children, and from students of traditional university age. With the recent shift toward continuous education and adult learning, especially in the professional sphere, it has become necessary to quantify these differences more closely.

Instructional design’ is a science-based field that synthesizes pedagogical realities and the neurological facts of learning. Although it can be applied to any learning community, the field has attained widespread recognition due to its role in adult-focused pedagogy.

It builds on and implements existing theories of adult learning in modern, effective ways.

Via Carlos Fosca, Dennis Swender, Ines Bieler
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
"As a general rule, adults need to be involved in planning their instruction and evaluating their results. They should be provided with an environment in which mistakes are safe, expected and a basis for continued learning, in keeping with a problem-centered approach to new ideas."

Those creating and implementing educational policy might want to read this article. Teachers can play a vital role in their own learning.
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Carlos Fosca's curator insight, April 17, 9:15 AM

Es bien sabido que los adultos aprendemos de manera diferente que los niños y que incluso los estudiantes universitarios tradicionales. Sin embargo, también es sabido que poco o nada se hace en la mayoría de programas de educación continua para cambiar la estrategia pedagógica del aula universitaria y por ello, una clase para adultos se diferencia poco de una clase tradicional que se ofrece a jóvenes estudiantes de pregrado o incluso de posgrado. La única diferencia radica en que los estudiantes adultos, en este caso, son los que obligan a cambiar la estrategia, cuando introducen preguntas prácticas en clase. El profesor debería planificar su curso y sus clases de una manera diferente, mucho más enfocado a la solución de problemas y a un aprendizaje muy contextualizado, promoviendo el debate y el aprendizaje entre pares. El resto lo ponen los estudiantes que pueden contribuir al aprendizaje de sus compañeros tanto o más que el profesor mismo.

Margarita Saucedo's curator insight, April 21, 10:51 AM
Andragogía: toma este ámbito de conocimiento
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Competency-Based Education - Foundation for Excellence in Education (U.S.) - Is there a path for Ontario?

Competency-Based Education - Foundation for Excellence in Education (U.S.) - Is there a path for Ontario? | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Every student has unique talents and abilities, and every student deserves an education that adapts to their needs rather than requiring conformity to an outdated model of education. Our nation’s goals and expectations for all students have risen. The conventional, one-size-fits-all system of education must evolve and adapt to meet the individual needs of each …

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
What if we placed subjects in the middle? Could we get to a good place? What does mastery mean?
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Margarita Saucedo's curator insight, April 20, 11:25 AM
EBC: un reto su implementación
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How Kids Learn Better By Taking Frequent Breaks Throughout The Day

How Kids Learn Better By Taking Frequent Breaks Throughout The Day | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

Excerpted from Teach Like Finland: 33 Simple Strategies For Joyful Classrooms (c) 2017 by Timothy D. Walker. Used with permission of the publisher, W. W. Norton. "Like a zombie, Sami*—one of my fifth graders—lumbered over to me and hissed, “I think I’m going to explode! I’m not used to this schedule.” And I believed him. An angry red rash was starting to form on his forehead. Yikes, I thought, what a way to begin my first year of teaching in Finland. It was only the third day of school, and I was already pushing a student to the breaking point. When I took him aside, I quickly discovered why he was so upset. Throughout this first week of school, I had gotten creative with my fifth grade timetable. If you recall, students in Finland normally take a fifteen-minute break for every forty-five minutes of instruction. During a typical break, the children head outside to play and socialize with friends. I didn’t see the point of these frequent pit stops. As a teacher in the United States, I’d usually spent consecutive hours with my students in the classroom. And I was trying to replicate this model in Finland. The Finnish way seemed soft, and I was convinced that kids learned better with longer stretches of instructional time. So I decided to hold my students back from their regularly scheduled break and teach two forty-five-minute lessons in a row, followed by a double break of thirty minutes. Now I knew why the red dots had appeared on Sami’s forehead."


Via John Evans, Vicki Moro, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The breaks students take can be breaks that teachers take with them. I used to go with students for recess and lunch break. It was time to converse in a more informal way.
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Slow Poisons | Easily Distracted

Slow Poisons | Easily Distracted | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
"1) Get as much labor from workers as you can, in part by decomposing some of the barriers between civic life, home life and work life. 2) Get as much labor for free from workers as you can, in part by taking advantage of older cultures of professionalism and civic obligation. 3) Make transparency a one-way street: encourage (or compel) workers to make as much of their working lives as can be imagined visible to and recorded by management or administration, but strongly restrict the ability of workers to get a transparent accounting of what happens with the information they share or give. 4) Shift workers into contractor positions or other workplace forms that reduce or eliminate the responsibility of employers to provide benefits or any long-term commitments to those workers. 5) Treat employees as psychological/economic models or objects rather than as reasoning citizens; privilege managerial approaches that nudge, manipulate, incentivize, and placate employees rather than engage with them in complex, honest terms."

The author begns by suggesting we might need a better word than neo-liberal to describe the poisons in academia. This is the case at all levels of school. Gert Biesta argued that teaching is relational and Bill Pinar suggested we only prepare children for a work place and not life. This is where John Dewey would fit so well.

What is intriguing is that we allow people who spend little or no time in classrooms to be the arbitors of what should be done in classrooms.
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Ana Cristina Pratas's curator insight, April 18, 1:53 PM

"I understand perfectly well, for example, how a whole series of workplace rules, practices and norms that have become common across the economy, including in academia, are connected by some common propositions or principles even when they seem ostensibly to be concerned with different issues. Among the connections are:

 

1) Get as much labor from workers as you can, in part by decomposing some of the barriers between civic life, home life and work life.
2) Get as much labor for free from workers as you can, in part by taking advantage of older cultures of professionalism and civic obligation.
3) Make transparency a one-way street: encourage (or compel) workers to make as much of their working lives as can be imagined visible to and recorded by management or administration, but strongly restrict the ability of workers to get a transparent accounting of what happens with the information they share or give.
4) Shift workers into contractor positions or other workplace forms that reduce or eliminate the responsibility of employers to provide benefits or any long-term commitments to those workers.
5) Treat employees as psychological/economic models or objects rather than as reasoning citizens; privilege managerial approaches that nudge, manipulate, incentivize, and placate employees rather than engage with them in complex, honest terms."

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Teacher resignation letters paint bleak picture of US education

Teacher resignation letters paint bleak picture of US education | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
As teacher resignation letters increasingly go public - and viral - new MSU research indicates teachers are not leaving solely due to low pay and retirement, but also because of what they see as a broken education system.

Via Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
This is a major and global challenge. We are seeing some of the same issues in Alberta. It will take new thinking and leading to transform schools and keep high quality teachers. We have to move past silver bullet solutions, cliche driven thinking, and people who spent little or no time in classrooms.
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Easter 2017 Reader: Grit, Poetry, Educational Rankings, Poverty

Easter 2017 Reader: Grit, Poetry, Educational Rankings, Poverty | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Grit Forget Grit. Focus on Inequality, Christine Yeh (Education Week) Grit is an easy concept to fall in love with because it represents hope and perseverance, and conjures up images of working-class individuals living the “American dream.” However, treating grit as an appealing and simple fix detracts attention from the larger structural inequities in schools,…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
A wide-ranging post that deals with the falseness of grit without considering the challenges children encounter in their lives, including systemic inequities.
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Homework: Helpful, Harmful, or Otherwise? - A common sense approach via Matt Renwick

Homework: Helpful, Harmful, or Otherwise? - A common sense approach via Matt Renwick | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
As I write this, I am out on our back patio. My kids are in the neighbor's backyard, flying a kite with friends. They had recently recovered the kite from a tree. This time around, they are staying away from the natural hazard. I don't know how they got the kite down previously; they had figured…

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Luciana Viter
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Do the students engage? Can parents help if necessary? I discovered if students were engaged in their homework and it was meaningful they found ways to get it done. If it lacked meaning, it did not get done or could not get done.
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Maria Del Mar Londoño's curator insight, April 15, 7:27 PM
I agree with the concept of homework seen as a policy more than a practice to develop more cognitive skill in students. The assignment of meaningful homework has been lost in the education field. It is seen more as a requirement for collecting grades than as a method for meaningful assessment that contributes not just to their learning process but also to their lives.
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Why Believing in Your Students Matters

Why Believing in Your Students Matters | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
When I hear statements from educators like: “I have the worst class I’ve had in years,” “These kids can’t do it” or “They don’t want to learn” my heart breaks for the students in their classes and in their schools. I know teaching is complex. The work is hard and seemingly never ending. I will…
Via Vicki Moro
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I remember a hug and the kind words a junior high teacher shared with me. It makes all the difference. Differences make a difference. This is the currere method informing who we are as teachers and our teaching.
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Helping Students Find Their Writer’s Voice

Helping Students Find Their Writer’s Voice | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Three exercises to get students writing with vivid detail—a key step to developing a distinctive style of their own.

Via Elke Höfler
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Sam Intrator described how a teacher he observed had students write about a small plot of grass about one square foot. The students did not want to, but, when they did, Intrator said the results were incredible. Students became attentive to small details that usually escaped their attention i.e. bugs.
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Why I write? And you should too. – The Mission – Medium

Why I write? And you should too. – The Mission – Medium | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
My relationship with writing is complicated. I used to write regularly. On startups and life lessons. That was two years back. And then I gave up. Other works got into the way. I told myself that I…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I try spending time each day writing. Some of it is cursive writing in a journal and other aspects are digital i.e. blogging. I discovered in my reseach that the teachers I interviewed reflected a great deal, but spent little time writing. The article raises good points. For me, the least important is creating a network. If it happens, it happens and it does.
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Teaching a Class With Big Ability Differences

Teaching a Class With Big Ability Differences | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Techniques for meeting the needs of students with diverse abilities and interests.
Via Cindy Riley Klages
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Providing choice can be great for students. They begin to take responsiblity for their learning. What works for each of them. "Differences make a difference." Good teachers understand this and still teach
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Where Good Ideas Come From & How Your Classroom Can Respond

Where Good Ideas Come From & How Your Classroom Can Respond | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Steven Johnson discusses where good ideas come from, and TeachThought offers takeaways for teachers.

Via EDTECH@UTRGV, juandoming
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
For me, the key take away was not to get to caught up in the packaged curriculum and policy i.e. using computers. How do the experiences of students and their problems help a teacher? How does a teacher's lived-experiences, their own curriculum, inform them and their teaching
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Karen Bonanno's curator insight, Today, 6:26 PM

Make them short, sharp and shiny. 

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10 Challenges That Every First-Time Manager Will Face

10 Challenges That Every First-Time Manager Will Face | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
“ Being a first-time manager is tough. Here are 10 challenges that first-time managers are likely to experience and what they can do to get through them.”
Via Ariana Amorim, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD, Vicki Moro
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
One of the challenges that is missed is asking for support from people who work for you. In teaching, school managers are teachers themselves. It seems reasonable that other teachers can help.
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Workplace Bullying: An Act of War Threatening the Health and Safety of Your Employees

Workplace Bullying: An Act of War Threatening the Health and Safety of Your Employees | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Bullying can have a serious impact on health and safety in your workplace. Learn more about its effects and how to identify bullying behavior.

Via george_reed
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
When I was teaching, I experienced and witnessed considerable workplace bullying. It seemed to be the good-to tactic for administrators and teachers. Do we keep good teachers in the fold?
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george_reed's curator insight, April 20, 12:47 PM
"Moreover, 72% of employers deny, discount, encourage, rationalize, or defend the bullying behavior." Don't fight the war with a toxic boss unless you know you can win.
 
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The Best Resources To Learn About Finland’s Education System

The Best Resources To Learn About Finland’s Education System | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Finland’s education system is touted by many as one of the best, if not the best, in the world, and its students consistently score at or neat the top of international tests (you might also b…

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
What I learned listening to Pasi Sahlberg was that what we should be doing is taking what can work here and applying it. He argued that what happens in Finland works there, but it cannot be applied lock, stock, and barrel to our situations. Imagine if we began to think that way about best practices (a terrible term) in our schools. What works in one place does not in another. What worked in one time does not in another. Changes are always necessary.
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Students bored out of their Minds

Students bored out of their Minds | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it


What happened in those nine years? Many things. But mainly, like the majority of my fellow Americans, I fell victim to the epidemic of classroom boredom :


1 - An escalating emphasis on standardized tests.

2 - The novelty of school itself fades with each grade.

3 - Lack of motivation.

4 - The transition from the tactile and creative to the cerebral and regimented.


Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Suvi Salo, Laurent BINDEL
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
John Dewey argued that teachers create a school setting where students can learn and apply what they learn. He also suggested education is much broader than the classroom. What appeals to students comes with them and goes home with them.
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CoryWillhite's curator insight, February 10, 9:17 PM

Promoting the idea of project based learning to stimulate student interest. Project based learning is founded on the idea of making the educational experience personal for all students. 

frostyyttrium's comment, February 11, 4:27 AM
Its interesting :)
Pascal Baquet's curator insight, February 13, 4:16 AM

U.S.A. focused but interesting article.

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10 of Our Favorite Poems About Teaching - WeAreTeachers

10 of Our Favorite Poems About Teaching - WeAreTeachers | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
These poems about teaching really nail what it's like to work in a classroom. What are your favorite poems about teaching? Please share!

Via Elke Höfler
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
There are good poems here. 
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Why idle moments are crucial for creativity

Why idle moments are crucial for creativity | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Our brains are at their most innovative when they are resting, so why aren’t we making time for quiet reflection?

Via Peter Mellow
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
When we meditate, it is an opportunity to let things percolate. I find that my thoughts flow and, when I am done, there is usually something new that emerged.
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Books that Changed My Perspective – The Year of the Looking Glass – Medium

Books that Changed My Perspective – The Year of the Looking Glass – Medium | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
This was first published on my mailing list The Looking Glass. Every week, I answer a reader’s question. I need to show some restraint in answering this because I could go on for hours talking about…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I am always interested in what others are reading. A coule of books I have in my library i.e. Daniel Kahneman and Carol Dweck. I am intrigued by a book entitled Sapiens.
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