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The Economics of Happiness

The Economics of Happiness | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

For decades, GDP has been the primary measure of the success of a society. Is it any wonder than we’re ever more prosperous but no more happy?


Via Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This is a great way to see the world. Succes will be measured quite differently if it can be measured at all. It might be we can only describe it.

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Belinda MJ.B's comment, April 30, 2013 1:55 PM
Thanks for sharing this amazing article!

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Education, Curiosity, and Happiness
What roles can curiosity and happiness play in learning?
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Mindfulness training may help stressed-out students

Mindfulness training may help stressed-out students | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Mindfulness techniques may help students focus, reduce stress and improve behavior.

Via Skip Boykin, Dorote Lucci
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

It does and it helps teachers.

 

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Relevant Math For Students’ Lives: Creating Context With Social Justice Issues

Relevant Math For Students’ Lives: Creating Context With Social Justice Issues | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
By examining equity issues through a mathematical lens, students are more engaged in learning about math and their communities.

Via Christopher Tienken
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Learning, thus teaching, should be relevant and that does not mean the same. It depends on (con)text.

 

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Humour in the face of the Horrible

Humour in the face of the Horrible | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Humour in the Face of the Horrible The Horrible The English-speaking countries of the world have little-to-no interest in the social and intellectual health of school children. When large-scale, hi...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The Western world argues using rhetoric i.e. win-win, begin with the end in mind, and individualized learning, as if those things will solve the challenges we face in our schools.

 

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12 Ways Successful People Handle Toxic People

12 Ways Successful People Handle Toxic People | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

To deal with toxic people effectively, you need an approach that enables you, across the board, to control what you can and eliminate what you can't.


Via Bobby Dillard
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I left. That would seem to be a 13th.

 

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The Metamorphosis, Kafka

The Metamorphosis, Kafka | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
“The Metamorphosis, Kafka”

Via Vilma Bonilla
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

It would be nice. Kindergarten students take naps. I wonder if there teachers do?

 

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How To Be Optimistic: 4 Steps Backed By Research

How To Be Optimistic: 4 Steps Backed By Research | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Everyone says you should be positive... but how? Here what science has to say about how to be optimistic.

Via Bobby Dillard
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

What if we looked forward to going to work, going to school, and living in general? It would make such a difference.

 

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He Asked 1500+ Elders For Advice On Living And Loving. Here's What They Told Him.

He Asked 1500+ Elders For Advice On Living And Loving. Here's What They Told Him. | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

Karl Pillemer has spent the last several years systematically interviewing hundreds of older Americans to collect their lessons for living. Pillemer admits he's an advice junkie. He's also a Ph.D. gerontologist at Cornell University.


Via Bookmarking Librarian
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Much of this advice is good for many ages.

 

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Why Teaching Kindness in Schools Is Essential to Reduce Bullying

Why Teaching Kindness in Schools Is Essential to Reduce Bullying | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

Practicing kindness has proven health and psychological benefits, and teaching kindness contributes to behaviour patterns that counteract the impulse toward bullying.


Via Andrea Zeitz, Luciana Viter
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

What if we treated each other kindly every day instead of on special days? This might begin with the way adults treat each other in School.

 

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Top Ten Relaxation Techniques for Children

Top Ten Relaxation Techniques for Children | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Includes: ten great ways to help children relax, and practice these techniques together.

Via Lon Woodbury, Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

These are mindfulness practices and very important for children and adults.

 

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Theory of Awesomeness (infographic)

Theory of Awesomeness (infographic) | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

Via Ali Godding, Jose Luis Yañez
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This is an interesting way of understanding flow theory.

 

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Ali Godding's curator insight, December 6, 2014 5:59 AM

I love that this infographic which highlights so clearly the balance needed to achieve a 'flow state' where everything just seems to feel great and happen naturally.

 

The balance of feeling happy about life as it currently is, as well as a clear vision of what you are working towards can feel paradoxical.

 

"How can I be happy now if I know I want something else?" Asks the life that expects everything immediately, through eyes that can only perceive black or white.I know that is how I first felt upon reading such words. It felt so contradictory!

 

I have been on a tour around each of the squares in that diagram, bouncing from a 'current reality gap' to 'stress' to a total and annihilating 'negative spiral'. I learned that being ok with where we are right now, is a critical element of getting where we want to be next. I saw it happen in my life.

 

The most memorable being totally comfortable with my single status whilst having a vision of meeting my soul mate. Those who know me, know that meet my soul mate I did!  It's as if that balance relaxes us, takes the pressure off, let's the world know 'I'm ok, I'm ready for what's coming next'.

 

The trick is to remember to have this balanced focus in all areas of life, even when it feels as if everything is falling apart.

 

Today I'm still recovering from an acute illness. I still need lots of rest, more than I realised. I need to be kind to myself. I've finally learnt how to do that, to accept 'that's what's going on right now' and that's just fine. I'm alive!

 

I have people around me that love me, a comfortable home and interesting work. At the same time I still have a vision of my future as someone full of vitality, physically strong and vibrant. And I know deep down it will happen, I'll get there.

 

I hope this post gives you some food for thought on your own state of flow, on feeding your own mojo!  

 

To find out more subscribe here: https://aligodding.leadpages.net/scoopit/

Ali Godding's curator insight, December 16, 2014 3:05 PM

I love that this infographic which highlights so clearly the balance needed to achieve a 'flow state' where everything just seems to feel great and happen naturally.

 

The balance of feeling happy about life as it currently is, as well as a clear vision of what you are working towards can feel paradoxical.

 

"How can I be happy now if I know I want something else?" Asks the life that expects everything immediately, through eyes that can only perceive black or white.I know that is how I first felt upon reading such words. It felt so contradictory!

 

I have been on a tour around each of the squares in that diagram, bouncing from a 'current reality gap' to 'stress' to a total and annihilating 'negative spiral'. I learned that being ok with where we are right now, is a critical element of getting where we want to be next. I saw it happen in my life.

 

The most memorable being totally comfortable with my single status whilst having a vision of meeting my soul mate. Those who know me, know that meet my soul mate I did!  It's as if that balance relaxes us, takes the pressure off, let's the world know 'I'm ok, I'm ready for what's coming next'.

 

The trick is to remember to have this balanced focus in all areas of life, even when it feels as if everything is falling apart.

 

Today I'm still recovering from an acute illness. I still need lots of rest, more than I realised. I need to be kind to myself. I've finally learnt how to do that, to accept 'that's what's going on right now' and that's just fine. I'm alive!

 

I have people around me that love me, a comfortable home and interesting work. At the same time I still have a vision of my future as someone full of vitality, physically strong and vibrant. And I know deep down it will happen, I'll get there.

 

I hope this post gives you some food for thought on your own state of flow, on feeding your own mojo!  

 

To find out more subscribe here: https://aligodding.leadpages.net/scoopit/

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George Siemens: ‘Students need to take ownership of their learning’

George Siemens: ‘Students need to take ownership of their learning’ | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
George Siemens

George Siemens is an internationally renowned and highly respected professor and researcher of technology, networks, analytics, and openness

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge, Valary Oleinik
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The etymology of education is twofold. First, educare suggests caring pedagogy leading children towards taking responsibility, rather than just ownership, for their learning. Second, as students become more responsible for their learning, educere is leading in ways that allows students more responsibility in directing their learning.

 

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María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, December 1, 2014 1:22 PM

El poder del estudiante en su propio Aprendizaje ...George Siemens: ‘Students need to take ownership of their learning’ | @scoopit via @eddebainbridge http://sco.lt/...

Alex Enkerli's curator insight, December 2, 2014 2:12 PM

Advocating for educational appropriation, innovative pedagogue George Siemens.

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Are You a Narcissist?: InfoGraphic

Are You a Narcissist?: InfoGraphic | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

Do they have an exaggerated sense of self-importance? Do they expect recognition or praise even when they haven’t earned it? Do they exaggerate their accomplishments? Do they have a sense of entitlement? Expect special favors? Feel envious of others? Act arrogant?

 

All of these traits are listed among the criteria for narcissistic personality disorder.


Via Ivo Nový
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I can think of a number of School managers I worked for this would be an excellent resource for them to look at regularly.

 

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Creating a Culture of Gratitude at Work

Creating a Culture of Gratitude at Work | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

As we approach the holiday season, lots of heart-felt stories about kindness and giving start to appear. Tis’ the season, so to speak. It’s a time when even the busiest people pause (even if only for


Via Jenny Ebermann
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

A simple thank you and a welcoming can be so important for adults and children alike.

 

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Jenny Ebermann's curator insight, November 29, 2014 5:34 PM
Gratitude counts in all cultures!
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10 things non-stressed-out peeps know + do

10 things non-stressed-out peeps know + do | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

"Stress" seems to be an epidemic right now -- emails to answer, activities to attend, houses to clean, groceries to buy, jobs to do... the pressure seems never-ending.

But here's what you need to know:

Stress may be a given in our lives...
but being stressed out doesn't have to be.

What Non-Stressed-Out People Know

1. They know stress is a normal and expected part of life

No one gets a "Get out of Stress Free" card in this game.

In fact, we need a healthy amount of nervous system activation to get through our days -- working and parenting and all the other important things we do require our energy and engagement. You know that list that ranks all the stressful life experiences that people can encounter? There are bad things on that list, like the loss of a job or the death of a loved one. But there are also good things on the list, like getting married, buying a house, and having kids.

Change is constant, and change often creates stress.

Non-stressed-out people know this. They know stress will show up in their lives, so they're less likely to be knocked down when it does.

2. They understand that what makes us stressed out is how we perceive the stressor

Stress researchers Richard Lazarus and Susan Folkman at UC-Berkeley have defined stress as, "a particular relationship between the person and the environment that is appraised by the person as taxing or exceeding his or her resources and endangering his or her well-being" (from Jon Kabat-Zinn's Full Catastrophe Living).

This definition of stress clearly indicates that stress is about our relationship to events and our perceptions of them. If you view a particular event as a threat (to your physical, emotional, or social well-being), then you'll likely experience it as stressful. If you choose to reframe the event, perhaps as an opportunity, then it may not be stressful at all.

Non-stressed-out people know to take a deep breath, and assess the situation. They try to see it like a camera would, noticing what is actually happening, instead of rashly interpreting the event from their limited perspective. And in that short period of time, a whole world of options open up.

3. They know when they are stressed

Has this ever happened to you? You get home from work, make dinner, start getting the kids ready for bed... and then a small infraction by your child sets off a wildly disproportionate reaction from you.

You were probably stressed out all day, and didn't even know it. We often spend our days in a state of low-grade fight-or-flight arousal, and then even the slightest stressor can set us off.

Non-stressed-out people are in tune with their bodies. They notice the tense shoulders, the furrowed brow, the tightening chest, or whatever their stress signals are, and then act (see below) to defuse the stress energy before it explodes.

4. They know they have power and choice

Resilient people have a sense of efficacy. They know they have a choice in how they respond. Jon Kabat-Zinn writes, "They view life as a challenge... and assume an active role in [it]."

They understand the serenity prayer -- they know they can change the things they control, and they choose to live in wise relationship with the things they cannot.

5. They have a sense of meaning

Non-stressed-out people know the why behind their actions. They act with purpose and intention. Even the most mundane task can have meaning -- for example, cleaning our home is a way of honoring our surroundings.

And when things go wrong, Non-stressed-out people find meaning in that, too.

"What we think are our failures are not failures. They are gifts -- revealing extremely useful information -- if we are open to being mindful of everything that unfolds in our lives, in a day, or in a moment, and putting it all to good use as grist for the mill." (Jon Kabat-Zinn)

What Non-Stressed-Out People Do

1. They practice mindfulness

With mindfulness, we learn to pause. We learn to see things as they actually are. We learn to drop the story, which only exacerbates the stress, and choose wise action.

The practice of mindfulness is what allows us to notice and experience the buildup of stress, instead of suppressing it. When we ignore and internalize stress, it never gets released.

Think of the zebra in the wild, who gets startled by a lion, and bolts away in a flight response. Once he's safe, the stress has been released from his body, and he calms down and takes a nap. He doesn't worry about what might have happened had his offspring had been eaten, or agonize over when the lion will return. (See Why Zebras Don't Get Ulcers).

If we ignore our stress, it builds up and we never return to a calm baseline. Mindfulness gives us a basic awareness of our stress. And then we can develop healthy restorative practices.

"Under duress we don't rise to our expectations, we fall to our level of training." -- Bruce Lee

So resilient people train.

2. They exercise

Exercise releases feel-good hormones and a bunch of other chemicals that promote resilience and well-being.

3. They get adequate sleep

How clear-headed are you without good sleep? It probably goes without saying that we're much more likely to resort to habitual reactions when we're tired. Jon Kabat-Zinn says that resilient people build up a "bank account" that they can draw upon during tough times. Sleep, exercise, healthy food, and meditation are the most important deposits we can make!

4. They make time for relationships and intimacy

We are social beings. Simply sharing our frustrations and talking about what's bothering us can relieve a great deal of our stress.

5. They put themselves in timeout

Non-stressed-out people make time for themselves. They nurture the hobbies that fulfill them and give their minds a break from day-to-day busy-ness. They go for a walk or read a good book or savor a delicious meal. They know that self-care is not selfish.

They do the things that feed their bodies, hearts, and minds. Janice Marturano, in Finding the Space to Lead, writes, "Such moments -- when we fully inhabit our bodies and our senses are at work on more than an internal storyline, checklist, or rehearsed conversation -- are what give life true meaning."

*****

Stress may be a given, but being stressed out doesn't have to be!


Via Vilma Bonilla
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The Frankl quote is huge.

 

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50 Awesome Quotes on Risk Taking

50 Awesome Quotes on Risk Taking | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

1. "Whatever you can do, or dream you can, begin it. Boldness has genius, power and magic in it." -- Goethe
2. "Security is mostly a superstition. Life is either a daring adventure or nothing." -- Helen Keller
3. "It's not because things are difficult that we dare not venture. It's because we dare not venture that they are difficult." -- Seneca
4. "Only those who will risk going too far can possibly find out how far it is possible to go." -- T.S. Eliot
5. "What you have to do and the way you have to do it is incredibly simple. Whether you are willing to do it is another matter." -- Peter Drucker


Via Alexander Crépin
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

These are not from obvious contemporary sources and reflect a more classic view of innovation and leadership.

 

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Cathryn Wellner's curator insight, April 10, 4:47 PM

Quotes don't change our life, but sometimes they give us a little hope.

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Being a Kind Boss Pays Off | Mindful

Being a Kind Boss Pays Off | Mindful | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

Emma Seppälä looks at the hard data on being a nice boss.


Via Jenny Ebermann
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

There is  a difference between being a leader and being a manager in the same way being a boss is not the same as the first two. An ethical view, per Aristotle, suggests aiming for the good and beautiful brings kindness along.

 

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Positive Teams Are More Productive

Positive Teams Are More Productive | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Research-based ways to make your employees happier.

Via Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

It makes sense. It does not mean people don't disagree. In fact, they might be more encouraged to speak their minds in a civil conversation.

 

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8 ways you may be encouraging your child to be a bully

8 ways you may be encouraging your child to be a bully | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

Admit it. You've watched and wondered: Is my kid a bully? - New Zealand Herald


Via Peter Mellow
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The one that surprised me was the over sharing. That seems counter-intuitive, but forcing something to happen is learning. It is coercive. The one that is missing, but might be there implicitly is being a good role model and avoiding bullying as an adult.

 

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Frozen Yoga? It’s Snowga

Frozen Yoga? It’s Snowga | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

It seemed as if yoga should have exhausted its opportunities for expansion by now, considering it has already made such unlikely alliances as marijuana, dogs, karaoke and stand-up paddleboards. But the yoga creep carries on with what may be the practice’s strangest bedfellow yet: snow.


This latest incarnation of yoga is called, inevitably, snowga, and it’s done outside in freezing temperatures, that archenemy of stretching, often as a mash-up with snow sports like skiing and snowshoeing.

In Bozeman, Mont., this winter, a company called Flow Outside began a twice-weekly class in which participants snowshoe to their destination as a warm-up, do about a half-hour of yoga, and then snowshoe home. Stowe Mountain Lodge in Vermont offers snowga (calling it Stowega) with both skiing and snowshoeing. And at Finger Lakes Yoga Escapes in Canandaigua, N.Y., an owner, Jennifer Hess, said snowga (her version is with snowshoes) has been such a success that she plans to introduce a class at night, with headlamps...


Via Vilma Bonilla
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This would be popular in many parts of Canada. It reminds about a game I developed with students called snowshoe soccer. They wanted to play soccer and I wanted them to do a winter, individual activity.

 

@ivon_ehd1

 

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Vilma Bonilla's curator insight, March 5, 8:21 PM

"The latest version is often a mash-up with sports like skiing and snowshoeing." ~ This is a thing, lolz. Who knew?

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Childhood Guilt, Adult Depression?

Childhood Guilt, Adult Depression? | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
New research shows differences in the brains of kids who show excessive guilty behavior, which may put them at risk for a host of mood disorders later in life.

Via Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Can we help children work through this?

 

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Which Jobs Have the Highest Rates of Depression?

Which Jobs Have the Highest Rates of Depression? | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Sometimes when I observe someone doing their job, I can't help but think, "Man, that must be hard." Maybe it's a retail worker dutifully leading a customer to the linens aisle for the umpteenth time.

Via Monica S Mcfeeters
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Education is just outside the top 7.

 

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Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, December 22, 2014 4:05 PM

Before students decide a career they might want to check this out.

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Get Happy from Being Present

Get Happy from Being Present | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

There’s been a lot of articles recently about mindfulness (bringing elements of meditation into everyday life). Recent scientific research suggests that those who advocate it are right – it really does improve many aspects of well being. This infographic collates some of the best of that research and shows how being present really can make you happier.


Via Ivo Nový
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

If teachers are present and help students in being present, it could make a difference.

 

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Employee study finds many Australian workplaces lack effective leadership - The Age

Employee study finds many Australian workplaces lack effective leadership - The Age | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Ineffectual leaders who fail to clarify their company's direction are the leading cause of worker disengagement.

Via Professor Jill Jameson
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I found this was the case, In School, one would think that there would be more caring and sympathetic leaders.

 

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The Importance of Being Care-full

The Importance of Being Care-full | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
I often like to make a distinction between caring and care-taking when it comes to leading others. This post, from 2011, gets more specific about what it means to care and why it’s important. =====...

Via donhornsby
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Caring for those we are there to help is an important aspect of pedagogic work.

 

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donhornsby's curator insight, December 1, 2014 10:29 AM

(From the article): No one can produce desired results if they are working with a murky set of expectations. So it is incumbent upon the leader who cares to be able to state what s/he expects, as simply and succinctly as possible and to ensure that the person to whom s/he is speaking understands those expectations in the way they were meant.

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Why Thankful People Are Happier And Healthier

Why Thankful People Are Happier And Healthier | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
It's the time of year where we feel like should feel thankful, but it turns out that gratitude is actually good for you.

Via Bobby Dillard
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The paragraph beginning with "dig for meaning" speaks about savouring life and living. It is a phenomenological experience where we appreciate rather than depreciate the ordinary contained in the extra-ordinary.

 

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