Education, Curiosity, and Happiness
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A High School Where the Students Are the Teachers | TIME.com

A High School Where the Students Are the Teachers | TIME.com | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
If high school students took charge of their education with limited supervision, would they learn? A Massachusetts school is finding out.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

Sam Intrator wrote several years ago the role of the teacher is to figure out who understands them in the classroom and let them serve as teachers along the way. It changes with each moment potentially.

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Education, Curiosity, and Happiness
What roles can curiosity and happiness play in learning?
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Give students individual feedback - Christensen Institute by Heather Staker

Give students individual feedback - Christensen Institute by Heather Staker | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
By: Heather Staker

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Individual feedback leads to a happier classroom. It makes sense.
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Tests Can’t Tell The Future So Quit Giving Them So Much Power

Tests Can’t Tell The Future So Quit Giving Them So Much Power | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
He looked like a 7th-grader’s version of a gangster. Skinny as a minute, practice tattoos from his friend dotting the tops of his fingers, laughing at everything. He wore lots of red: a flat-brimme…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Tests are test one's ability to memorize information long enough to be tested. The real test is what happens as we live life. Teaching is relational. It is about reaching students and inspiring them in profound ways.
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What is school for? – Learning {Re}imagined – Medium

What is school for? – Learning {Re}imagined – Medium | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
This interview was recorded for Renegade Inc on September 7th 2016 and first appeared on the Renegade community. Reposted here with kind permission. Graham: Hello, I’m Graham Brown-Martin. My…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
This is a long transcript of an interview. This is a question we should ask daily. Also ask "what does teaching mean to me?" He makes the point that parents play a vital role in their children's success.
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Assessment as a Map

Assessment as a Map | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
A recent post on assessment by Professor Martin Weller has caused me to think about assessment differently. Though the idea of assessment as a navigation tool may not be new (assessment for direction?), it's the analogy of a new subject as an “alien landscape" and assessment acting (can assessment act? ANT people may smile here) as a…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
John Dewey described the official curriculum as a map. He continued by saying it could not be a clear map with precise markers to one's destination. Derrida and Ricoeur claimed that the permanence of the written word allows it to be continuously interepreted in new settings. Madeline Grumet wrote about this as well.

Teachers interpret the fuzzy and incomplete map. How they do so is partly through assessing students finding their way on the faded and poorly marked map. How are students experiencing their journey. We might want to understand assessing as learning and teaching and learning and teaching as assessing
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How I Eliminated (Almost) All Grading Problems In My Classroom - by Terry Heick

by Terry Heick

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Ines Bieler
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Choose what to summatively assess carefully. I use the word assess because it overlaps with formative assessment and assessing as we learn. Make what students learn visible in the classroom and perhaps beyond. Science Fair was a one activity that students enjoyed and took pride in. No fails; use incomplete. Help the students complete the learning to a point where understanding is in place. That might mean keeping track of who has not handed in an assignment. Create alternative ways to assess. I used projects and rubrics. Most students engaged in those. Some students wanted to write tests. I honoured student strengths.
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School Should Be Impractical – The Synapse – Medium

School Should Be Impractical – The Synapse – Medium | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
When I taught middle school, students worked through this cycle in our rapid prototyping Maker Projects and cardboard challenges. They weren’t always practical. In fact, some of the ideas were downright fantastical. But in the midst of the impractical, students gained long-lasting practical skills. Students who tinker with products and ideas learn to think divergently by using materials in unexpected ways. As they split test their ideas through experimentation, they engage in iterative thinking. In other words, they learn to think like entrepreneurs.

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

Quite an interesting and thought-provoking article. At times, it might seem that Spencer is making a mountain out of a molehill, but if you stop and think about what he's saying, in the macro view, it makes a lot of sense. A good question is then, how do, we in education, get to ponder (and even act upon) the macro view when we are perpetually swamped with micro concerns? 


Via Jim Lerman, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD, Mike Kelly
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Fixed outcomes in a curriculum-as-plan are impractical. Uncertainty and complexity in the curriculum-as-lived are paradoxically practical.

The key headings are embrace confusion and complexity, go outside (Sam Intrator writes about this), tinker more (I like ponder, while over, meditate upon, etc.), and scratch your itch (what are you curious about?)
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Kim Auld's curator insight, May 25, 8:20 PM
Really good ideas for getting the kids to use higher thinking.  It is nice to see mother earth fitting into the playground of wonder again. I love the concepts of tinkering and scratch the itch. 
 
Suzanne Dunn's curator insight, May 27, 8:15 PM
I love this article. Authentic Learning at it's best! We're not doing our students any favours by hand feeding them information or even by making learning too easy.  I appreciate there needs to be a balance but in the real world we have to call on innovation to solve problems, big and small, everyday.  In my former job (as a clothing designer) not a day went by that we weren't having to think completely out of the box and come up clever, often impractical, solutions to making a machinists, cutters or pattern makers mistakes look like they weren't mistakes.  This more often than not resulted in a 'better' end product because we were forced to be really creative to fix the issue.  

After reading this article I'm inclined to take a box of odd bits and pieces into the Visual Arts room and get the students to contribute 5 bits each and then all tinker for a lesson and turn our bits into something useful for a loved one.  I'd also like to take in a defected toy and see what ideas the students could come up with to enable that toy to still be sold or played with successfully.  I think I should also consider some of my real-life experiences and how I can apply these in my Clothing Textiles class.
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A Solution for Student Disengagement

A Solution for Student Disengagement | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

"Tap students’ leadership potential to help them form strong bonds with each other and with their school."


Via WEAC, bsweet
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
" What is one memory you have about a time in school when you felt strongly connected to other students? What is one memory you have about a time in school when you felt strongly disconnected from other students? Think back to someone—an adult or peer—in your school experience who threw you a lifeline. He or she knew you and cared about you, and this person’s caring made a positive difference in your life"

This is the at the heart of currere, which is an autobiographical way to understand curriculum. How do we engage students? First, (re)member what it was like to be a student. Second, learn who you students are and what interestes them.
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Art education / autism / Rip van Winkle / How people learn / handwriting / learning based on students' questions

Art education / autism / Rip van Winkle / How people learn / handwriting / learning based on students' questions | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Education Readings By Allan Alach I welcome suggested articles, so if you come across a gem, email it to me a
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Two articles that got my attention were Life Changing Teachers and Art Education being important.
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School environment key to retaining teachers, promoting student achievement

School environment key to retaining teachers, promoting student achievement | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
New research identifies four organizational and administrative factors that can decrease teacher turnover and lift student test scores in math.

Via Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
"A school is more likely to retain effective teachers, a new study reports, if it is led by a principal who promotes professional development for teachers, is characterized by collaborative relationships among teachers, has a safe and orderly learning environment and sets high expectations for academic achievement among students, a new study reports."

I hope we are not just discovering this. Good teachers leave because their voices are silenced and they are marginalized by administrators, parents, and other staff.
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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, May 28, 12:48 PM
I have understood this for some time. Happiness not salary are essential to wanting to stay on a job. Money is important. If I have it, it is not a guarantee I will stay.

I would have taught for 1/2 of what I made. That is not a popular sentiment. I left because I was not certain I made a difference. I was concerned I would become a cog in the machine just showing up.
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The Key to Improving Teaching and Leading

Making a daily practice of visiting classrooms, observing briefly, and talking with teachers has the greatest potential to improve student learning, help professionals grow, and help schools become more effective learning organizations.
I've come to this conclusion by studying an unlikely role model: Toyota. At Toyota, continuous improvement and employee development happen primarily through interactions between mentors and mentees—employees and their supervisors—on the factory floor or wherever the work is being done. We might assume that leadership in a manufacturing company would be rigidly top-down, numbers-driven, and directive toward frontline staff. But Toyota's focus on conversation is precisely what sets it apart from its competitors.

Via Mel Riddile, Bobby Dillard
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Teachers visiting each other's classrooms and having conversations is a way for them to grow, which is under used.
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Sathi Hd's comment, May 25, 1:34 PM
Online Shopping in Bangladesh,
http://www.ecabbd.com/
Kelly Christopherson's curator insight, May 26, 2:09 PM
Learning, it's about the conversations of the learners and their thinking.  
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Education Readings May 26th

Education Readings May 26th | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
By Allan Alach I welcome suggested articles, so if you come across a gem, email it to me at allanalach@inspire.net.nz What the Fidget Spinners Fad Reveals About Disability Discrimination ‘Autistic people (and others with developmental disabilities) have been fighting a war for decades. It's a war against being forcibly, often brutally, conditioned to behave more…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
There are interesting articles in this edition. What would a question based curriculum look like? I used to mine for questions as I taught. I put them in my lesson plans, distributed those to students and parents.
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We Teach Who We Art

Content and resources for the education researcher
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
This was a premise underlying my dissertation and accompanying research.Yes, we struggle at various times in our careers, sometimes copying others. However, to be successful we have to be who (ipse-identity) we are, not a copy (idem-identity).
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We reviewed 60 studies on what makes for a dream job. Here’s what we found.

We reviewed 60 studies on what makes for a dream job. Here’s what we found. | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
We reviewed over 60 studies. We found a dream job isn't highly paid or easy, and need not involve your "passion". Rather, focus on 6 key ingredients.
Via Edouard Siekierski, Luciana Viter
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I once told a group of teachers I would teach for 1/2 the money. It was not a popular comment. What this articles points out is money is overrated. Yes, we need money to live, but it does not make us happy per se.

To find a dream job, look for: Work you’re good at, Work that helps others, Supportive conditions: engaging work that lets you enter a state of flow; supportive colleagues; lack of major negatives like unfair pay; and work that fits your personal life.
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21st Century Skills Have Always Been “Needed” Skills, But Now We Need Them More Than Ever

21st Century Skills Have Always Been “Needed” Skills, But Now We Need Them More Than Ever | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Communication is changing fast (my 7-yr old daughter and I just exchanged Snaps while I am in Chicago and she is outside of Philadelphia in different time zones, with real-time interaction)…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The four C's are communicating, collaborating (I prefer cooperation), critical thinking, and creating. I changed three to gerunds of verbs. Content becomes a means to these skills. Problem solving helps form these skills.
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What to Say to Your Students Today – Prizmah – Medium

What to Say to Your Students Today – Prizmah – Medium | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Knowing that we are all in the business of educating the next generation of leaders together, this is a learning moment. Our communities represent a wide range of political, religious, and personal…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Education is not a business. School may be, although I hope not. Despite that, the article speaks to teaching being giving hope to students, sharing in a democracy, and that they make a difference.
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Seneca on True and False Friendship

Seneca on True and False Friendship | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
If you consider any man a friend whom you do not trust as you trust yourself, you are mightily mistaken and you do not sufficiently understand what true friendship means… When friendship is settled, you must trust; before friendship is formed, you must pass judgment. Those persons indeed put last first and confound their duties, who … judge a man after they have made him their friend, instead of making him their friend after they have judged him. Ponder for a long time whether you shall admit a given person to your friendship; but when you have decided to admit him, welcome him with all your heart and soul. Speak as boldly with him as with yourself… Regard him as loyal and you will make him loyal.

Via iPamba
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Stoic philosophy is growing on me.
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Rethinking the Lesson Plan

Rethinking the Lesson Plan | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
When I was in my teacher preparation program, I remember being taught to complete extensive lesson plans to ensure I was prepared to engage students in learning the specified content.  I was expected to know how to differentiate for diverse needs of students.  I thoughtfully planned modifications for students with special needs and English language…

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I agree. We need to rethink lesson plans. I don't agree with the empowering being the next step after engaging. I think they overlap. The article goes on to speak of agency. Without personal power/authority, agency might not be possible. However, wtihout continously engaging each student in their learning can agency continue to occur?

I think community is essential in classrooms. It suggests conversation and dialogue are possible. I shared my lesson plans each day with each student. I listened to their feedback. I shared rubrics with them and we had conversations about meaning and how they might use rubrics to guide their learning. I learned from them in those moments. Lesson plans should be understood as lesson planning, the gerund of the verb plan and not the noun plan.
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The Real Reason Teachers and Leaders are Overwhelmed - @ajjuliani

The Real Reason Teachers and Leaders are Overwhelmed - @ajjuliani | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
“ What is true is that change is constant. It’s also getting exponentially quicker. This is not only in education, but in many fields of work. It’s taken a while for change to pick up the speed with which we now see it in the classroom, but it has always been there. So, how do we handle this as teachers and school leaders? How can we keep the frustration and desperation from boiling over and hurting all potential progress? More importantly how can we make sure the frustration and desperation does not trickle down to our students and impact their learning experience in a negative way? Well, we can start with these guiding beliefs: ”

Via John Evans, Vicki Moro
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The teachers I intereviewed spoke about the pace of change and how it could overwhelm them. As well, they spoke about the lack of support during periods of mandated change i.e. new marks programs. They spoke about it was good to gather with other teachers based on age, subject matter, and interests.
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Don't Let Personalized Learning Become the Processed Food of Education 

Don't Let Personalized Learning Become the Processed Food of Education  | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Let's make sure not to break learning into little bits and scraps and bytes of disparate skills, disconnected from an inspiring, coherent whole.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
"What I saw concerned me. The school was obsessed with standards, which were printed everywhere. But teacher-led instruction had become practically verboten. Everything looked like distilled and fragmented test-prep."

What can we do to engage students? Put learning in front of them that arouses their curiosty. Each child will experience it differently. Good teaching is relational and inspires.
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Harvard Student Submits Rap Album As A Thesis And Receives Honors

Harvard Student Submits Rap Album As A Thesis And Receives Honors | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
He was the first in the school's history to do so.

Via Stephania Savva, Ph.D, Jim Lerman, Yashy Tohsaku
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
How students are completing school and degrees is changing.
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Ditch the grammar and teach children storytelling instead

Ditch the grammar and teach children storytelling instead | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Storytelling in its way can have just as much complexity as music or mathematics. That we don’t really understand this craft – or that this is a craft – is partly because of the romantic myth of “inspiration” peddled by authors as much as anyone. It is taught (up to a point) in creative writing degrees – but it can be simplified enough to be taught to schoolchildren as well.

Via Nik Peachey, John Evans, Kelly Christopherson
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
When I moved to activies like Fractured Fairytales, students took considerable care with spelling, punctuation, and grammar. They asked others and me to proofread.
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Ricard Garcia's curator insight, May 25, 6:39 AM
Please, can someone pay attention to what this guy is saying??? In total agreement with his view!
Enrique Facundo Ruiz Blanco's curator insight, May 25, 3:40 PM

Excelente propuesta educativa para enseñar a contar cuentos (y construir desde las palabras) más que una gramática abstracta sin contexto ni sustento. Va con lectura política incluida. 

Viljenka Savli (http://www2.arnes.si/~sopvsavl/)'s curator insight, May 26, 5:25 AM
Great!
 
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Developing a Growth Mindset in Teachers and Staff | #ProfessionalDevelopment #ModernEDU

Developing a Growth Mindset in Teachers and Staff | #ProfessionalDevelopment #ModernEDU | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
An idea that is beginning to gain a lot of favour in educational circles at the moment is the notion of fixed versus growth mindsets, and how they might relate to students and learning. Based on the work of Stanford University psychologist, Carol Dweck, the idea of mindset is related to our understanding of where ability comes from. It has recently been seized upon by educators as a tool to explore our knowledge of student achievement, and ways that such achievement might be improved.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=Growth+Mindset

 


Via Gust MEES, Jim Lerman
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
A growth mindset among teachers is essential to their growth as teachers. John Dewey wrote about this extensively. Keith Haggart points out modelling, new ideas, time for self-reflection, and formative feedback are important. However, these are not in evidence in many schools.
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Kirstin Beckett's comment, May 26, 2:31 AM
Hi please do check out a similar piece on http://www.assignmenthelp.net/blog/growth-mindset-in-classroom/
Jan Swanepoel's curator insight, May 27, 7:02 AM
The notion of fixed versus growth mindsets - and how it relates to students' learning and academic development - is explored further in this article . According to Stanford University psychologist, Carol Dweck, the idea of mindset is related to our understanding of its impact on our abilities and learning, and it is agreed that the notion of developing a growth mindset is as equally applicable to staff and teacher performance as it is to students.
Leah Brosnan's curator insight, May 27, 9:46 PM

I have one student in particular who is struggling with growth mindset. Participates well until he makes a mistake, then removes himself completely. At the start of our next lesson we will be going through a visual representation like this to help with self awareness.

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Start writing by “freewriting” and let yourself dance a little.

Start writing by “freewriting” and let yourself dance a little. | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Freewriting is the act of getting yourself physically moving,
doing writing movements,
loosening your writing apparatus
to engage in the motions that are necessary
to do writing work. Freewriting…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I try spending time each day free writing as part of the method of currere. The questions that emegre do let me dance in truly unexpected ways.
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What Does it Mean to Be Educated? | Alliance for Self-Directed Education

What Does it Mean to Be Educated? | Alliance for Self-Directed Education | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
A treatise on advancing real education by rising above the outdated, coercive schooling model of centuries past
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Blake Boles' lenghty article is a good read. He concludes engaging students is essential, teach by consent, balance offline and online lives, and student responsbility and choice are key.

It is important to note that self-directed education still has structure. Dewey's concept of self-interest is essential to this and leads to conversations. There is still teaching that happens. Instead of it being a free-for-all, self-directed learning and the teaching that accompany it are a conversation focused on the summary points.
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Education that Matters – CJE

Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
One of the challenges pointed out by the Joel Westheimer in the article is how little research may inform teacher practices. There seems to be a dualism between theory and research that should not exist. How do we make research relevant to teachers? How do we make schools relevant, through research, to students and teachers?

Westheimer refers to journal entries about his teaching and interactions with students. Would that be a place to begin? Do teachers keep journals of this nature?
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