Education, Curiosity, and Happiness
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Six steps to effective teacher development and evaluation | eSchool News

Effective teaching is a complex alchemy—requiring command of subject matter, knowledge of how different children learn, and the ability to maintain order and spark students’ interest.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

What if we allowed teachers to work collaboratively? This requires time and a commitment to share in open, honest ways that may not exist presently. Teachers are learners and they might learn best from those around them rather than a distant administrator.

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Education, Curiosity, and Happiness
What roles can curiosity and happiness play in learning?
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Quality Teaching

The Question Mark is a leading provider of free information to guide school thinking about questions and questioning.

Via Malachy Scullion
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Alchemy, craft, and art are essential to good teaching. There is always the transforming of our craft as an art form.
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How I Connect Students Through Project-Based Learning -

How I Connect Students Through Project-Based Learning - | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
One area that I’ve tried to focus on in my teaching recently is collaboration, specifically how students collaborate with one another.

I enjoy having students work together within the same class because I believe in the value of building relationships and establishing a positive classroom culture. I also know how effective it is to take advantage of the time in class for students to become more familiar with each other and to work together towards a common goal.

Understanding that not everything can be accomplished in a classroom is a big reason for this shift in my teaching–and this is where I believe that technology can be extraordinarily useful with a real sense of purpose.

Via Miloš Bajčetić, Jim Lerman
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Project-based learning includes students cooperating in their learning. Frequently, they share common interests and it is essential for a teacher to bring them together.
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There Is No Silver Bullet For Education Reform

There Is No Silver Bullet For Education Reform | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
The "silver bullet" belief assumes that all schools face the same challenges.

Via Mark E. Deschaine, PhD, Stephania Savva, Ph.D
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
There is not. What we need are teachers, students, administrators, politicians, and community members sharing their experiences. Those closest to the classroom have to given a space for their voices to be heard. This means teachers and students have to be genuinely listened to.

PS it is not education reform we are looking for. It is school reform and transforming our schools. Education is a 24/7 phenomenon.
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Critical thinking: how to help your students become better learners

Critical thinking: how to help your students become better learners | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Want your class to make the most out of learning opportunities? Try focusing not just on the task itself, but how they approach it
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Critical thinking is part of a complex of skills i.e. metacognitive, keeping a journal, self-awareness, etc. Costa and Kallick's Habits of Mind are a great way to teach those skills.
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Reading List

Reading List | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
These 25 books helped Tom Bilyeu escape The Matrix and unlock his true potential. Read them if you want to take the red pill.

Via Ariana Amorim, Bobby Dillard
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Viktor Frankl, Joseph Campbell, and Nassim Taleb are part of a diverse list.
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Assessment: Turning a Blunt Instrument Into a Powerful Learning Tool

Assessment: Turning a Blunt Instrument Into a Powerful Learning Tool | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
It’s ironic that assessment in schools is most often “something adults do to students,” as Rick Stiggins puts it, because all humans are highly evolved for learning, and self-assessment is a powerful tool all learners use. Whether you are trying to master a recipe, solve an equation, improve your golf swing, you continually ask yourself questions such as “Have I learned to do what I need to do?” “What did I do wrong?” “How do I improve?” and, most importantly, “How did I learn that?” All, assessment. Wouldn’t it be great if schools didn’t turn a

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Students should be involved in assessing their learning. For example, rubrics serve as a conversation tool. When I design one, I consider what I want to tell students. I engage in conversation about the rubric. I make adjustments based on student feedback. While they are completing an activity, I check in with them and see how things are going. Is the rubric helping them?
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Schools Are Missing What Matters About Learning

Schools Are Missing What Matters About Learning | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Curiosity is underemphasized in the classroom, but research shows that it is one of the strongest markers of academic success.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Curiousity and meaningfullness make a difference in learning and teaching. I want to know more about something that interestes me. It echoes John Dewey's concept of self-interest and Bill Pinar's method of currere.
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Do Principals Really Think All Teachers are Effective? - Education Next

Do Principals Really Think All Teachers are Effective? - Education Next | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
A new study finds that principals do differentiate their teachers’ performance, but formal personnel ratings don’t reflect this differentiation.

Via Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
If you are not in the classroom, do you understand what it means to be effective? This is a challenge.
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Meaningless work threatens job performance

Meaningless work threatens job performance | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

It causes anger and disappointment, and can negatively affect employees' later motivation, write Adrian Chadi, Sabrina Jeworrek and Vanessa Mertins


Via Roger Francis, Meus
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
This makes sense.
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Projects Vs Project Based Learning: What is the difference?

Projects Vs Project Based Learning: What is the difference? | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
All of these resources make sense on the surface, however many teachers fail to recognise that Project Based Learning is a process of sustained and deep inquiry. Rooted in the cognitive architecture of how the brain works and how humans learn. Without fully understanding this process our greatest intentions often result in engaging learning experiences for students, where deep learning fails to prosper.

Via Nik Peachey, Saberes Sin Fronteras OVS
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Project based learning is much more compex than just doing a project. There is a chart part way through that helps differentiate the two.
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Nik Peachey's curator insight, July 15, 12:46 AM

Good article clarifying the differences and giving clear examples.

Margarita Saucedo's curator insight, July 17, 2:21 PM
Claro que hay diferencia, el PBL favorece la metacognición
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Opinion | How the Modern World Made Cowards of Us All

Opinion | How the Modern World Made Cowards of Us All | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

The connotation of prudence as caution, or aversion to risk, is a modern invention. “Prudence” comes from the Latin “prudentia,” meaning sagacity or expertise. The earliest English uses from the 14th century had little to do with fearfulness or habitual reluctance. Rather, it signified righteous decision making that is rooted in acuity and practical wisdom.



Via Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
"The connotation of prudence as caution, or aversion to risk, is a modern invention. “Prudence” comes from the Latin “prudentia,” meaning sagacity or expertise. The earliest English uses from the 14th century had little to do with fearfulness or habitual reluctance. Rather, it signified righteous decision making that is rooted in acuity and practical wisdom."

When applied to teaching and education, Gadamer described prudence (sageness and expertise) and other virtues i.e. care, imagination, and speaking truthfully as central to a concept known as Bildung. Artistotle used the word phronesis.
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Building a Culture of Continuous Learning for Teachers

Building a Culture of Continuous Learning for Teachers | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
We’re all familiar with the traditional model of professional development: an outside consultant comes in during the summer or at the beginning of the school year, spends a few hours or a couple of days introducing the new program or initiative, and leaves teachers with a stack of implementation materials.

And then teachers go back to the classroom, put the materials on the shelf beside the materials from last year’s new initiative, and go back to teaching the same way they always have.

It’s no mystery why this model for PD doesn’t spark lasting change in classroom practice. The mystery is why we ever expected it to in the first place.

The truth is, teachers, much like their students, need more than a one-shot lecture to master and apply new material. Effective professional development takes place within a continuous “Cycle of Learning” that includes targeted instruction, planning, application, and assessment.

Via Edumorfosis, Mark Cottee
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
There are good points made in the article. For example, the current model of teacher education is based on delivery of theory, often as a one time venture and teachers figuring out the practical on their own.

There is no mention of teacher voice and choice in the article. When I have a choice and express that choice in my voice, I want to learn what is being offered. Too often, it is voice and choice that is missing. We do not build cultures. They form.
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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, July 26, 7:34 AM
Building a Culture of Continuous Learning for Teachers
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We’re asking kids all the wrong questions in school

We’re asking kids all the wrong questions in school | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Research, and common sense, show that kids learn more by being actively engaged in what they’re doing. When they engage in discussion, teach others, and grapple with a math problem, they boost their ability to absorb and retain information. The evidence is mounting against schools that fail to take this approach. Most are still built around making sure kids have the right answers to rote questions, rather than the tools to formulate meaningful questions that deepen their learning. In a randomized controlled trial of nearly 2,500 nine and 10 year-olds in the UK, students who were taught the skill of reason—how to formulate questions and thoughtfully explain an argument—performed better on assessments of math, science, and English than kids who had not been exposed to this kind of skill-building.
Via Miloš Bajčetić
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Content is a vehicle to teach skills. With skills, students can adapt to changing situations .
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Indigenous Research Methodologies: Resources and Readings

Indigenous Research Methodologies: Resources and Readings | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Let me start by stating the obvious. I am not an Indigenous person and as such, my understandings of Indigenous ways of knowing and understanding the world are limited. Having said that, I find myself working with students who want to conduct research about Indigenous issues. When that happens, I counsel my students to consider…

Via Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Indigenous education and school curriculum can complement each other when teachers and researchers take time and are thoughtful.
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Avoiding Assessment Mistakes

Assessment is arguably the piece of the learning cycle we get most wrong. 


Whether looked at from the perspective of the learner, the teacher, the
school administrator, the politician or the parent, assessment is
misunderstood and poorly utilised as a tool for learning. The importance of chan....


Via Mark E. Deschaine, PhD, Peter Mellow
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Effective assessment is part of the teaching and learning. It is timely and consists of feedback that can be used by students. It has to be meaningful and involve students and teachers in a conversation about their learning.
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The 2 best tools for building an engaged workforce

Over the last two decades, the relationships that individuals expect to have with their employers and their roles at work have begun to shift. Now, not only do we seek to practice our skills in order to earn a paycheck, we strive to gain recognition for our contributions, and we yearn to experience a deep sense of fulfillment and meaning from our work. In short, we place a whole lot of emphasis on where and how we’re willing to spend that irretrievable 85,000 hours of our professional life; and smart leaders understand that fact.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I once told a group of teachers I would do what I did for 1/2 the price. It is an unpopular stance, but do we want people who enter teaching for money? I know that Alberta based teachers are well paid, so it may be that in other jurisdictions teachers are in the classroom for the right reasons.
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Standards: Why Realizing the Full Promise of Education Requires a Fresh Approach

Standards: Why Realizing the Full Promise of Education Requires a Fresh Approach | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Yong Zhao takes a critical eye to standards and the purposes they serve.

Via Mr. Meade
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The focus of the article based on an interview with Yong Zhao is what purpose do standards serve?
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The Perfect Assessment 

The Perfect Assessment  | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
The Perfect Assessment by Terry Heick Nothing is perfect, but we can dream. So let’s dream about assessment. First, what is an assessment? A measurement? A snapshot? A kind of bar for students to clear?

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Good assessment tools are ongoing.
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Rob Reich of Stanford: Big Philanthropy Empowers Plutocrats

Rob Reich of Stanford: Big Philanthropy Empowers Plutocrats | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Rob Reich,Director of the Center for Rthics in Society at Stanford University, warns that big money is using the guise of philanthropy to advance their personal agenda and bypass democratic institutions. https://qz.com/1035084/philanthropists-dont-deserve-our-gratitude-says-a-stanford-ethicist/ "Exceptionally wealthy people aren’t a likeable demographic, but they have an easy way to boost personal appeal: Become an exceptionally wealthy philanthropist. When…
Via Monica S Mcfeeters
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Big philanthropy is one way of buying something. People feel grateful to a billionaire or billionaires who give them their excess money. What are we really selling them? In eduction, it is more standardization, the use of certain tools, and a curriculum that promotes a neo-liberal agenda. This is more than an economic issue.
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There's No Such Thing as "Just a Teacher"

There's No Such Thing as "Just a Teacher" | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
“ I have been an educator for almost thirty years, which means I have seen new teachers come and go. Some were never meant to be teachers. Teaching, to them, was supposed to be a cushy job with hours from 8-3 and weekends and summers off. Hello!? I am thankful that it didn't take these people twenty, ten, or even five years to figure out that teaching was not their calling. THEN, in walks a new teacher! S/he is the real deal and brings an aura, a presence, a passion, a willingness, a direction, and a drive to reach and teach. The first three to five years will make or break this great educator. It is our responsibility as the lions to help the cubs to mature and become masters! We can help to acclimate them, help them grow, be available when they stumble, encourage and support them, and share our valuable experiences and strategies with them--the positives more than the negatives, please and thank you. ”
Via John Evans, Vicki Moro
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
"Though student teaching does help, it is not enough. The first-year teacher is hired for a specific position, given his/her own classroom (yay!), and overwhelmed with curriculum and "other assigned duties." They are asked to write lengthy lesson plans for every subject taught each day of the week, to keep student grades updated (which absolutely needs to be done), to sponsor clubs or organizations or classes, to contact parents and explain the reasons for little Johnny's failing class (which terrifies a new teacher), to go to meetings and conferences, to give state and district mandated tests! tests! tests! (so they can fret about their upcoming evaluation--no stress there), and attend an immense amount of professional development on top of it all."

Each of the people I interviewed questioned the benefits of undergrad learning, student teaching, and professional development. Teaching is learned by teaching. Deborah Britzman wrote Practice Makes Practice which underscores this.
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Victor Ventura's curator insight, July 16, 2:55 PM
We all have an obligation to assist new teachers in their first few years. This means ongoing PD, mentors, coaches, assignment considerations, appropriate supervision and evaluation, peer support...
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Why play is essential to design thinking

Why play is essential to design thinking | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
"The creation of something new is not accomplished by the intellect but by the play instinct . . . " - Carl Jung, psychologist and psychoanalyst I

Via Stephania Savva, Ph.D, malek
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Play is essential in learning and teaching.
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Another School District Says ‘No’ To Homework

Another School District Says ‘No’ To Homework | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Heidi Maier has directed the teachers at her county’s 31 schools to stop providing homework to their students. “The research showed that students who are given a preponderance of homework do not perform better, or get better grades, than those who do not,” the superintendent stated.

There will be exceptions for special projects and research papers, but gone are the days of time-consuming homework packets being sent home in backpacks every night. Instead, the teachers will encourage parents to read with their children for at least 20 minutes each evening after school lets out.

Via Mel Riddile, Alfonso Gonzalez, Jim Lerman
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Hopefully, this is not the flavour of the day and is sustained. Just like learning, homework has to be meaningful to students. Most of it is not.
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School Isn't Uber And Never Should Be

School Isn't Uber And Never Should Be | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
If the school choice reformers have their way, not only will rural schools suffer, but schools like the high school where I taught will be devastated.

Via Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
How do we meet the needs of each student by standardizing our schools? When we privatize, who do (further) disenfranchise?
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How People Learn: An Evidence-Based Approach

How People Learn: An Evidence-Based Approach | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Deans for Impact believes that teacher educators should focus on how students acquire and retain information to help them build their critical-thinking and problem-solving skills.

Via Stephania Savva, Ph.D, Miloš Bajčetić
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I hope teachers use data and evidence in their teaching and student learning. Otherwise, what are we doing?
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Does the word 'teacher' still describe what educators do in the classroom?

Does the word 'teacher' still describe what educators do in the classroom? | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

In 2008, Heidi Williams, author of the book “No Fear Coding,” began asking herself some retrospective questions about her role as a teacher at an International Baccalaureate School in Racine, Wisc. These questions led her to the conclusion that the career she thought she entered was not the one she was experiencing, and it was time for her to refine her role and mission.

I don’t call myself a teacher anymore.

“I don’t call myself a teacher anymore,” says Williams. The title she prefers is “stretch instructor.” Williams adds: “Even as an administrator, I am a stretch instructor. I strive to reach every child.”

According to the Merriam-Webster Dictionary the word “teach” comes from the Middle English word techen, meaning “to show or instruct.” To Williams, that definition had built up too many negative connotations over time, including the implication that she was simply standing in front of a classroom dictating to children—something she felt was an inaccurate depiction.


Via Edumorfosis, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Actually, our school system was designed in the 19th Century to socialize young people into a factory system. Teaching is teaching despite what the article suggests. We can use new words and phrases, but teaching is responding to children's needs which means multiple roles are performed.
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