Education, Curiosity, and Happiness
2.1K views | +5 today
Follow
Education, Curiosity, and Happiness
What roles can curiosity and happiness play in learning?
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from digital divide information
Scoop.it!

Fairy Tales and Globalisation: Bringing Up the Young in the Values and Virtues of Great Civilisations

Fairy Tales and Globalisation: Bringing Up the Young in the Values and Virtues of Great Civilisations | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

Globalisation affects children’s values, self-images and world outlook through targeted marketing of fairy tales, games and assorted media products. This article analyses these effects and proposes a number of measures to counteract them. Pro-active, grassroots approaches on the part of educators, writers, and artists should help produce specially designed storybooks, animated cartoons, and online games that would introduce the young to a variety of cultures, including aboriginal cultures, without, at the same time ‘Hollywoodising’ them. These approaches should be positive and affirmative rather that fear mongering and alarming.

Particular attention should be given to the difficult task of providing models of behaviour for boys, helping them reach maturity and inner harmony. Educators, above all parents, must critically discuss the values of competitiveness and egoism with their children in spite of the messages broadcast by corporate media.

Empowerment of parents is posited as the main motive force of demands to change educational policies and to circumscribe the scope of advertisement targeting children. Parents must promote sensitivity to their cultural heritage, read bedtime stories, and otherwise be there for their offspring. Children should also be given a chance to hear stories that have shaped their ancestors’ culture for generations. Children should acquire what rightly belongs to them: their cultural heritage.This involvement should produce a generation freed from the belief, actively promoted by business interests, that neoliberal globalisation is natural and inevitable. They should become citizens in spite of the massive globalised efforts to reduce them to consumers. This, in turn, should prompt national governments to resume their duty as protectors of children from undue commercial interests and from the values that underlie such interests. But for this to happen, the change has to come from below.

Via The Planetary Archives / San Francisco, California, Bonnie Bracey Sutton
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
One way to approach learning about the values and virtues of people and great civilizations is through humanities-based learning.
more...
The Planetary Archives / San Francisco, California's curator insight, July 17, 12:17 PM

Seriously, don't let children watch TV, especially alone.....

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from Educational technology , Erate, Broadband and Connectivity
Scoop.it!

Project-Based Learning Research Review

Project-Based Learning Research Review | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Studies have proven that when implemented well, project-based learning (PBL) can increase retention of content and improve students' attitudes towards learning, among other benefits. Edutopia's PBL research review explores the vast body of research on the topic and helps make sense of the results. In this series of five articles, learn how researchers define project-based learning, review some of the possible learning outcomes, get our recommendations of evidence-based components for successful PBL, learn about best practices across disciplines, find tips for avoiding pitfalls when implementing PBL programs, and dig in to a comprehensive annotated bibliography with links to all the studies and reports cited in these pages.

Via Jim Lerman, Bonnie Bracey Sutton
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Project-based learning is a wonderful way to achieve curricular outcomes and engage students.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from Digital Delights - Digital Tribes
Scoop.it!

Global Survey of Educator Effectiveness


Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Forming trusting, compassionate relationships with students, having a kind, caring, and patient personality, and knowledge of learners were among the top five traits. Also in the top five were subject knowledge and professionalism. 23 countries, including Canada, were in the survey.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from Cultivating Creativity
Scoop.it!

On the Edge of Chaos: Where Creativity Flourishes

On the Edge of Chaos: Where Creativity Flourishes | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
How does an educator know if she’s creating space for creativity? The way Bilder describes it, students in a classroom that allowed for creativity would appear to a visitor to be enraptured in what they were doing — they’d be in the zone. “You’d have a hard time distracting them and getting them away from what they’re working on,” Bilder said. He highlighted project-based learning as a way that educators are beginning to introduce choice, and thus freedom, into school work, making space for at least some creativity.

COGNITIVE TRAITS OF CREATIVITY

Generating lots of different ideas is more important to creativity than many people realize. That’s partly because of the free flowing nature of coming up with lots of ideas, no matter how ridiculous they seem, but it’s also because it gets the idea out of the brain, making space for the next idea.

Via Jim Lerman
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
"So, can educators help their students become more creative? Some teachers are moving in that direction, loosening the rules, giving students choice, celebrating ideas and behaviors that challenge the status quo, but without a drastic reimagining of the structures within which educators work, true creativity could be hard to find in school."

The constraints on teaching and learning in school are significant.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from the plastic brain
Scoop.it!

The Potential Benefits of High School Music Classes - Learning and the Brain blog

The Potential Benefits of High School Music Classes - Learning and the Brain blog | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

From Learning and the Brain June Newsletter:


"Should 9th graders start music classes–even if they’ve never played an instrument before? Are there academic benefits to studying music? Is 9th grade too late a start to get those benefits? Should my school’s STEM program become a STEAM program?

A recent study by Adam T. Tierney offers some answers to these compelling questions.

The Short Version

Tierney & Co. followed 19 high school students who enrolled in a high school music ensemble, and compared them to 21 students at the same school who started a JROTC program.

These groups started off nicely matched in various academic and linguistic measures. However, at the end of 4 years, the group that had studied music improved in some suggestive ways.

First, the neural signatures of their response to speech changed meaningfully; oversimplifying a bit here, they were “more mature.”

Second, the musicians improved more than the JROTC participants in their ability to distinguish between and manipulate language sounds."


Via iPamba
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The fine arts benefit learning and the brain. I wonder if there are links to coding?e
more...
GLOBALHACKERS.RU's curator insight, June 22, 3:53 AM

 

GET PAYPAL transfer,WESTERN UNION transfer, BANK TRANSFER, MONEYGRAM TRANSFER/LOGINS, CCTOP UP visit www.globalhackers.ru

100% LEGIT PAYPAL ACCOUNTS/transfers,WESTERN UNION transfers,BANK TRANSFER,MONEYGRAM TRANSFER/LOGINS,CCTOP UP,

>> WWW.globalhackers.ru

**** WE PROVIDE LIVE SCREEN SHARE OR VIDEO PROOF OF ACCOUNTS OR TRANSFERS BEFORE PAYMENT IS MADE!.

****WE DO NOT SELL ANY FAKE WU BUG SOFTWARE, NO DUMB PAYPAL MONEY ADDERS, NO PAID TO CLICK, FOREX,HYIP...

****WE DEAL STRICTLY ON TRANSFERS AND LOGINS.

ALL transfers are legit and backed by secure dedicated offshore servers..

****no charge back or trace backs.

we have moneyback and Rienburstment policy with 24/7 support.

official website---visit http://www.globalhackers.ru

contact email _____ globalhackers01gmail.com
contact skype ______ wu hackerz
contact website_____ www.globalhackers.ru
contact icq ______ 701247445
contact phone ______ +1(251-589-7809
contact fb ______ globalhackers

OR
blogs---http://wubugz.blogspot.com/

https://turbopurchase.wordpress.com/

>>>>>>> *** www.globalhackers.ru*** <<<<<<<>>>>>>>>> Visit *** www.globalhackers.ru *** for real screenshot proof of accounts and transfers.

Scooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD
Scoop.it!

We Teach Who We Art

Content and resources for the education researcher
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
This was a premise underlying my dissertation and accompanying research.Yes, we struggle at various times in our careers, sometimes copying others. However, to be successful we have to be who (ipse-identity) we are, not a copy (idem-identity).
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from Effective Education
Scoop.it!

Challenges Teachers Face in the Classroom

Challenges Teachers Face in the Classroom | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
The pointers to mention the challenges faced by teachers every day in the classroom.

Via EdTechReview (@etr_in), Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
There are several excellent points in the article. One that leapt out and is worth considering is the one about lethargic and sleep deprived students. We know from research children and youth brains do not really get going until about 9:30 AM, yet we get them and start school earlier. There are logistics i.e. buses, but what if we structured the day differently, starting with enjoyable activities that engage students. Would that reduce misbehaviour?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD
Scoop.it!

Why I write? And you should too. – The Mission – Medium

Why I write? And you should too. – The Mission – Medium | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
My relationship with writing is complicated. I used to write regularly. On startups and life lessons. That was two years back. And then I gave up. Other works got into the way. I told myself that I…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I try spending time each day writing. Some of it is cursive writing in a journal and other aspects are digital i.e. blogging. I discovered in my reseach that the teachers I interviewed reflected a great deal, but spent little time writing. The article raises good points. For me, the least important is creating a network. If it happens, it happens and it does.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD
Scoop.it!

Easter 2017 Reader: Grit, Poetry, Educational Rankings, Poverty

Easter 2017 Reader: Grit, Poetry, Educational Rankings, Poverty | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Grit Forget Grit. Focus on Inequality, Christine Yeh (Education Week) Grit is an easy concept to fall in love with because it represents hope and perseverance, and conjures up images of working-class individuals living the “American dream.” However, treating grit as an appealing and simple fix detracts attention from the larger structural inequities in schools,…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
A wide-ranging post that deals with the falseness of grit without considering the challenges children encounter in their lives, including systemic inequities.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from Teacher Tools and Tips
Scoop.it!

What saying 'I' says about you

What saying 'I' says about you | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Researchers say that your usage of the pronoun 'I' says more about you than you may realize.

Via Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

I wonder what it means when the person who overuses "I" has no real authority based on experience?

more...
Sharrock's curator insight, October 10, 2013 10:39 AM

One interesting statement: "Avoiding the first-person pronoun is distancing." I would be interested in the book "The Secret Life of Pronouns" just to find out why people refer to themselves in the third person (techically, using one's name when talking about oneself is not often using a pronoun, but maybe cognitively, it is. 

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from educational implications
Scoop.it!

The Differences between Happiness and Meaning in Life

The Differences between Happiness and Meaning in Life | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

In recent years, a number of studies have further supported the differences between happiness and meaning. In one clever study, Baumeister and colleagues found that factors such as feeling connected to others, feeling productive, and not being alone or bored contributed to both happiness and meaning. However, they also found some important differences:

Finding one’s life easy or difficult was related to happiness, but not meaning.


Feeling healthy was related to happiness, but not meaning.


Feeling good was related to happiness, not meaning.


Scarcity of money reduced happiness more than meaning.


People with more meaningful lives agreed that ‘relationships are more important than achievements’.


Helping people in need was linked to meaning but not happiness.
Expecting to do a lot of deep thinking was positively related to meaningfulness, but negatively with happiness.*


Happiness was related more to being a taker rather than a giver, whereas meaning was related more to being a giver than a taker.


The more people felt their activities were consistent with core themes and values of their self, the greater meaning they reported in their activities.


Seeing oneself as wise, creative, and even anxious were all linked to meaning but had no relationship (and in some cases, even showed a negative relationship) to happiness.


Via Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Happiness and meaning in life can be intertwined, but it is not necessarily so. To find meaning in a concentration camp in WWII as Frankl did does not mean we are happy with our lot. I find meaning in teaching. It does not mean I am always happy.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from Tools for Educational Researchers
Scoop.it!

Are the world’s schools making inequality worse?

Are the world’s schools making inequality worse? | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
by William Schmidt Distinguished  Professor , Michigan State University The answer appears to be yes. Schooling plays a surprisingl

Via Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The short answer is yes.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from Effective Education
Scoop.it!

Peers, more than teachers, inspire us to learn

Peers, more than teachers, inspire us to learn | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
'Why do I have to learn this?' It's a common question among youth, but new research suggests students perform much better academically when the answer is provided by their peers rather than their teachers.

Via Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Sam Intrator wrote about how teachers can learn to use students effectively as translators and interpretors. I had students sitting at tables and the sharing between them came more naturally and it was reciprocal.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from the plastic brain
Scoop.it!

School, Self-Regulation, and the Brain - Learning and the Brain blog

School, Self-Regulation, and the Brain - Learning and the Brain blog | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

From Learning and the Brain June Newsletter:


"A just-published study asks about the effect of schooling on the brain. (A chatty, readable summary by one of the authors can be found here.)

More specifically, it looks at a young child’s ability to self-regulate: a skill that early schooling emphasizes–and, of course, one that’s highly necessary for sustained success in almost any meaningful activity or relationship.

The authors take advantage of the arbitrary cut-off date for schooling, and look at brain development for children who were just old enough–or not quite old enough–to enroll in 1st grade.

The research question was: can we find meaningful differences in self-regulatory areas of the brain after a year of 1st grade (children just within the cut-off date) compared to a year of kindergarten (children just beyond the cut-off date)? Did these brains develop alike over the course of this year, as part of typical human development? Or, did the more academic structure of 1st grade influence brains to develop differently than the more playful freedom of kindergarten?"


Via iPamba
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Yes, school and structure change brains. What role does play play in the structure?
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from E-Learning-Inclusivo (Mashup)
Scoop.it!

Teaching and Learning Research Summaries: A collection for easy access.

Teaching and Learning Research Summaries: A collection for easy access. | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
There are several superb summaries of educational research that have been compiled into easily accessible websites and articles in pdf format that can be read online and shared with staff. Although they are easy to find via an internet search, I am pulling them together into one place for easy access.   I'll keep adding to…

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Javier Sánchez Bolado, juandoming
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
There is a lot of material here. I am not sure all of it is research in the strictest sense of the word.
more...
Stephania Savva, Ph.D's curator insight, June 7, 2:40 AM
This is an incredibly useful resource-pack with research for anyone into teaching, as well as parents and educational psychologists.

Scooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD
Scoop.it!

Education that Matters – CJE

Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
One of the challenges pointed out by the Joel Westheimer in the article is how little research may inform teacher practices. There seems to be a dualism between theory and research that should not exist. How do we make research relevant to teachers? How do we make schools relevant, through research, to students and teachers?

Westheimer refers to journal entries about his teaching and interactions with students. Would that be a place to begin? Do teachers keep journals of this nature?
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from Science, Technology, and Current Futurism
Scoop.it!

Minding the details of mind wandering

Minding the details of mind wandering | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
“Over the years, a number of different constructs have been unified under the single term ‘mind wandering,’ and through that process, the distinction between intentional and unintentional types was lost,” said Seli. “However, if intentional and unintentional types of mind wandering behave differently, and if their causes differ, then it would be exceptionally important to distinguish between the two. Without such a distinction, researchers will effectively conflate two unique cognitive experiences, and as a consequence, our understanding of mind wandering will be incomplete and perhaps even flawed.”


Via Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Is mind wandering good in some cases? I think it can be. It might be in those moments we explore and sow the seeds of creating. It may also point out a pedagogy need to engage each student in different ways. Learning who your students are is essential to teaching them.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from Cool School Ideas
Scoop.it!

Brains, Brains, Brains! How the Mind of a Middle Schooler Works

Brains, Brains, Brains! How the Mind of a Middle Schooler Works | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Blogger Heather Wolpert-Gawron launches this three-part series by advising middle school teachers to read up on brain research which will give insight on how the 'tween brain works.
Via Cindy Riley Klages
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Good research can be helpful for teachers to draw on and inform their teaching.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor
Scoop.it!

Why You Hate Work

Why You Hate Work | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Excessive demands are leading to burnout everywhere.

Via Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

Not only do we hate work, we hate the commute to and from our work. I told colleagues I would teach for 1/2 the price. That was the wrong thing to say to other teachers. Apparently, even limited altruism is not welcome. When we work for money, it is inevitable that we will become unhappy. When we work for the love of what we do, we find ways to overcome the obstacles.

more...
Sharrock's curator insight, June 11, 2014 9:24 AM

excerpt: "A 2012 global work force study of 32,000 employees by the consulting company Towers Watson found that the traditional definition of engagement — the willingness of employees to voluntarily expend extra effort — is no longer sufficient to fuel the highest levels of performance. Willing, it turns out, does not guarantee able. Companies in the Towers Watson study with high engagement scores measured in the traditional way had an operating margin of 14 percent. By contrast, companies with the highest number of “sustainably engaged” employees had an operating margin of 27 percent, nearly three times those with the lowest traditional engagement scores."