Education, Curiosity, and Happiness
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Education, Curiosity, and Happiness
What roles can curiosity and happiness play in learning?
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The Key to Improving Teaching and Leading

Making a daily practice of visiting classrooms, observing briefly, and talking with teachers has the greatest potential to improve student learning, help professionals grow, and help schools become more effective learning organizations.
I've come to this conclusion by studying an unlikely role model: Toyota. At Toyota, continuous improvement and employee development happen primarily through interactions between mentors and mentees—employees and their supervisors—on the factory floor or wherever the work is being done. We might assume that leadership in a manufacturing company would be rigidly top-down, numbers-driven, and directive toward frontline staff. But Toyota's focus on conversation is precisely what sets it apart from its competitors.

Via Mel Riddile, Bobby Dillard
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Teachers visiting each other's classrooms and having conversations is a way for them to grow, which is under used.
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Sathi Hd's comment, May 25, 1:34 PM
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Kelly Christopherson's curator insight, May 26, 2:09 PM
Learning, it's about the conversations of the learners and their thinking.  
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A Solution for Student Disengagement

A Solution for Student Disengagement | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

"Tap students’ leadership potential to help them form strong bonds with each other and with their school."


Via WEAC, bsweet
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
" What is one memory you have about a time in school when you felt strongly connected to other students? What is one memory you have about a time in school when you felt strongly disconnected from other students? Think back to someone—an adult or peer—in your school experience who threw you a lifeline. He or she knew you and cared about you, and this person’s caring made a positive difference in your life"

This is the at the heart of currere, which is an autobiographical way to understand curriculum. How do we engage students? First, (re)member what it was like to be a student. Second, learn who you students are and what interestes them.
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Journaling for Professional Development: Developing Yourself Through Reflection

Journaling for Professional Development: Developing Yourself Through Reflection | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Learn how journaling regularly can help you build new skills, develop self-awareness, and achieve your goals.

Via Ariana Amorim, Kevin Watson, Ricard Lloria
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I journalled when I was teaching. What I discovered was it was not helpful; not because it could not be, but because I just vented. Since retiring, I have journalled and focused on what I felt, what I was doing, and how this informed who I was becoming. It has made a difference.
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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, May 16, 10:40 AM
I discovered that only one teacher I interviewed journaled. Each teacher said they reflected extensively, but only one set it down on paper. It is good to journal to reflect on mistakes and what worked; keep information fresh, solve problems, and grow as a teacher.
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Why children like Louie are disadvantaged by the NSW school system

Why children like Louie are disadvantaged by the NSW school system | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Parents pay a high price for home educating children with a disability whose needs are not met by schools.

Via Peter Mellow
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I discovered that many home school parents did so, because of a concern for their children's well-being. Policy makers, bureaucrats, and school managers outside classrooms talk a good talk, but do not provide the supports to teachers and students. I discovered parents were often quite knowledgeable about what worked for their child(ren) and I only had to ask. They were willing to have conversations and teach me, as were the students.
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5 blogposts about 5 things

5 blogposts about 5 things | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
For some reason bloggers have started writing posts that list 5 things this weekend. So here's my list of 5 blogposts that do that. 1) 5 principles of education by @greg_ashman 2) Five Things I Wish I knew When I started Teaching by @C_Hendrick 3) The 5 worst education arguments by graphics by @JamesTheo 4) Practice vs. talent: Five principles for effective teaching by @DavidDidau…
Via Ines Bieler
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
There are interesting links to five posts that outline things teachers wished they knew, key principles of teaching, practice and talent in teaching, etc.
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Accreditation: “‘relatively superficial, extremely time-consuming and doesn’t lead us to a goal of significant improvement'”

For well over three decades, I have been both a full-time educator (high school English teacher for 18 years and currently a college professor, going on 16 years) and a writer. As a high school teacher, I also taught journalism and was the faculty sponsor for the school newspaper and literary magazine over about 10-11…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Teachers are qualified (accredited) to teach and socialized into existing orders and are identified as teachers. Some remain there with little change. They accept what they were taught and socialized into as young teachers. Others (Ivor Goodson suggested about 20%) reorder what qualifies and socializes them into teaching subjectively. If each teacher does not move past the first two stages to the third, accreditation is relatively superficial. When they do, a complex Venn diagram emerges of how we each experience becoming a teacher.
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Why Leaders Think They're Evolving When They're Not

Why Leaders Think They're Evolving When They're Not | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Most businesses have stripped employees of their identities, leading to a leadership identity crisis that infects businesses across America and prevents innovation and initiative. Leaders must encourage employees to passionately go above and beyond.

Via donhornsby
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
"The problem is that most businesses have stripped employees of their identities...."

Insert the word teachers for employees and schools for businesses and you have the essence of my dissertation. How does each teacher inform their particular identity in a sea of constraints? That is a question premised on a Judith Butler quote.
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donhornsby's curator insight, April 25, 10:26 AM
Only when you are being your most authentic self, sharing it and consistently living it every day, can you evolve into the inclusive leader most businesses and America needs.
 
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Why I write? And you should too. – The Mission – Medium

Why I write? And you should too. – The Mission – Medium | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
My relationship with writing is complicated. I used to write regularly. On startups and life lessons. That was two years back. And then I gave up. Other works got into the way. I told myself that I…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I try spending time each day writing. Some of it is cursive writing in a journal and other aspects are digital i.e. blogging. I discovered in my reseach that the teachers I interviewed reflected a great deal, but spent little time writing. The article raises good points. For me, the least important is creating a network. If it happens, it happens and it does.
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10 Challenges That Every First-Time Manager Will Face

10 Challenges That Every First-Time Manager Will Face | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
“ Being a first-time manager is tough. Here are 10 challenges that first-time managers are likely to experience and what they can do to get through them.”
Via Ariana Amorim, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD, Vicki Moro
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
One of the challenges that is missed is asking for support from people who work for you. In teaching, school managers are teachers themselves. It seems reasonable that other teachers can help.
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Uh-Oh... Got More Passion Than Talent?

Uh-Oh... Got More Passion Than Talent? | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Find a way to work at the intersection of these four circles.

But be careful... don't stray too far from what you love. There's a Japanese concept called ikigai, which means "reason for being." You have one, but it can take a great deal of effort, experimentation, and self-inspection to find it.

In my experience, people often get pushed away from their "reason for being" by a strong interest that overshadows other of their interests. That is, you have a strong interest that is not supported by your talents, and this fact causes you so much disappointment that you stop examining your other interests. But if you look deeply, you will likely find other interests that are supported by your talents.

Via David Hain, Ian Berry
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I loved teaching, people paid me to teach, and I did it well. The concept of ikigai has merit through effort, experimenting, and self-reflection. As well, it might be we have to find the right people who are willing to lift us up.
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David Hain's curator insight, April 14, 5:04 AM

How to find your Ikigai - your reason for being!

Ian Berry's curator insight, April 15, 7:53 PM
good insights into living on purpose
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Teaching Your Students How to Have a Conversation

Teaching Your Students How to Have a Conversation | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Guest blogger Dr. Allen Mendler presents eight strategies for helping your students reclaim and master the lost art of conversation.

Via Arizona State University, Claire McLaughlin, Pilar Moral
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The use of board and card games can be a great prop for having conversations.
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Arizona State University, Claire McLaughlin's curator insight, April 5, 4:20 PM
I often tell students to practice their English by having conversations with the cashier at the supermarket, the person waiting at the bus stop, classmates waiting for class to start.  Often time, they reply with a well-deserved "How?"  I like this article because it sets up how to actually have a conversation.  It addresses the physical and not just the language.
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Building collective leadership from the central office | CTQ #CTQCollab

Building collective leadership from the central office | CTQ #CTQCollab | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
This reads like another top-down mechanism. Yet, the author argues that collective leadership is a human enterprise that can be unravelled by mechanistic systems.
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To Be An Effective Leader Keep A Leadership Journal

To Be An Effective Leader Keep A Leadership Journal | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

Teddy Roosevelt did it. Harry Truman did it. Want to be an outstanding leader? Keep a leadership journal. As part of my executive coaching work, one of the most effective tools I recommend that powers up the coaching process is a leadership journal.  The exercise of leadership is not unlike a sport you play. When you review your actions in the field you learn what worked, what didn’t, and adjust along the way. Leadership guru Peter Drucker said: “ Follow effective action with quiet reflection. From the quiet reflection will come even more effective action. ”


Via The Learning Factor, Disera Doss, donhornsby, Roy Sheneman, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I think this is an underused tool in many professions. Moreover, we do not journal about what we experience and how we feel about those experiences. We want to shape the world without reshaping ourselves.
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Begoña Pabón's curator insight, April 4, 7:40 AM
Mejorar en tu liderazgo requiere de intensas reflexiones sobre cada una de tus acciones que te permitan ser cada vez mas efectivo 
drula eric's curator insight, April 4, 2:33 PM
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donhornsby's curator insight, April 5, 9:20 AM
Follow effective action with quiet reflection. From the quiet reflection will come even more effective action
 
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from Effective Education
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School environment key to retaining teachers, promoting student achievement

School environment key to retaining teachers, promoting student achievement | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
New research identifies four organizational and administrative factors that can decrease teacher turnover and lift student test scores in math.

Via Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
"A school is more likely to retain effective teachers, a new study reports, if it is led by a principal who promotes professional development for teachers, is characterized by collaborative relationships among teachers, has a safe and orderly learning environment and sets high expectations for academic achievement among students, a new study reports."

I hope we are not just discovering this. Good teachers leave because their voices are silenced and they are marginalized by administrators, parents, and other staff.
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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, Today, 12:48 PM
I have understood this for some time. Happiness not salary are essential to wanting to stay on a job. Money is important. If I have it, it is not a guarantee I will stay.

I would have taught for 1/2 of what I made. That is not a popular sentiment. I left because I was not certain I made a difference. I was concerned I would become a cog in the machine just showing up.
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Lifting All Leaders - ASCD Express

Lifting All Leaders - ASCD Express | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

A recent New York Times op-ed makes the case that the national school improvement debate over-focuses on teachers and should consider how school leaders set the conditions that enable great teaching and learning. In a blog post ("Teachers Quit Principals, Not Schools"), literacy coach Shawnta Barnes simply states, "Yes, teacher development is important, but a great teacher under a poor leader is a teacher who is likely to leave and a school that is not likely to succeed." This issue looks at elevating the knowledge and skills of school leaders, who have so much riding on their shoulders, in ways that directly benefit the school community.

Go and See: The Key to Improving Teaching and Leading
Why observing and talking with teachers is the best professional development for instructional leaders—and the best way to improve schools.
Six Keys to Successful Change Management
The most common reason many edtech projects fail is that district leaders pay too little attention to the need for change management. Here are six strategies that are crucial for success.
10 Dimensions of Holistic Leadership
A British school uses 10 qualities of good leadership—and their opposites—as a self-reflection and evaluation tool for school leaders.


Via Jim Lerman
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
It is challenging for good teaching to exist in the midst of weak leading. I left teaching because what we call leading is managing. Teachers having a voice in their professional growth is essential.

The point that is missing is what role do teachers play in leading in schools? Teaching and leading overlap in many ways.
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Bringing a Growth Mindset to Professional Development

Bringing a Growth Mindset to Professional Development | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
A veteran educator shares a new vision for professional development that ditches the PowerPoint and involves teachers in their own learning.

Via Mel Riddile, Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Teachers should be involved in their own learning and choose what is important to their teaching. Andragogy, which is teaching adults, and pedagogy are different. With lived-experiences adults can choose in responsible ways. Will they make mistakes? Yes, but part of learning is becoming responsible for those mistakes and learning.
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Critical Digital Pedagogy and Design

Critical Digital Pedagogy and Design | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it

Critical instructional design moves toward learning that blends a new form of rigor with agency through a practice of inquiry, empathy, and emergence.


Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
How do we bring schools and campuses to life with interdisciplinary dialogue? How do we have teachers share in dialogic ways with each other? How do they grow? How do they model their growth with their students?
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Shannon Rasmussen's curator insight, May 13, 11:23 PM
Very interesting and insightful read!
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Can learning like a child combat cognitive aging?

Can learning like a child combat cognitive aging? | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Rachel Wu, a psychology professor at University of California, Riverside has proposed that we can dramatically increase our cognitive health as adults if we continue to learn new skills the way we did as children.

Via Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The "renaissance person" is essential to combating cognitive aging. Have broad interests and learning new things is essential.
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Suvi Salo's curator insight, May 6, 9:14 AM
via @alexanderwear 
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The Difference Between Pedagogy, Andragogy, And Heutagogy

The Difference Between Pedagogy, Andragogy, And Heutagogy | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
The Difference Between Pedagogy, Andragogy, And Heutagogy

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Sarantis Chelmis
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
It is essential to know the difference. For examp.le, teacher education should follow andragogical principles and heutagogy as they gain experience.
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Liberal Learning as Conversation

Liberal Learning as Conversation | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
By John B. Bennett The values of liberal learning can be represented by the values that mark conversation: participation, engagement, openness to others.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I would add Hans-Georg Gadamer and David Bohm to the references, but this is a great article. Conversation and dialogue are different than discussion and debate. This can be used with care in K-12 school settings with teachers and students.
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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from Assessment | Learning and Teaching | Coaching
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The Principles of Adult Learning Theory 

The Principles of Adult Learning Theory  | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
It has long been understood that adults learn differently from children, and from students of traditional university age. With the recent shift toward continuous education and adult learning, especially in the professional sphere, it has become necessary to quantify these differences more closely.

Instructional design’ is a science-based field that synthesizes pedagogical realities and the neurological facts of learning. Although it can be applied to any learning community, the field has attained widespread recognition due to its role in adult-focused pedagogy.

It builds on and implements existing theories of adult learning in modern, effective ways.

Via Carlos Fosca, Dennis Swender, Ines Bieler
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
"As a general rule, adults need to be involved in planning their instruction and evaluating their results. They should be provided with an environment in which mistakes are safe, expected and a basis for continued learning, in keeping with a problem-centered approach to new ideas."

Those creating and implementing educational policy might want to read this article. Teachers can play a vital role in their own learning.
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Carlos Fosca's curator insight, April 17, 9:15 AM

Es bien sabido que los adultos aprendemos de manera diferente que los niños y que incluso los estudiantes universitarios tradicionales. Sin embargo, también es sabido que poco o nada se hace en la mayoría de programas de educación continua para cambiar la estrategia pedagógica del aula universitaria y por ello, una clase para adultos se diferencia poco de una clase tradicional que se ofrece a jóvenes estudiantes de pregrado o incluso de posgrado. La única diferencia radica en que los estudiantes adultos, en este caso, son los que obligan a cambiar la estrategia, cuando introducen preguntas prácticas en clase. El profesor debería planificar su curso y sus clases de una manera diferente, mucho más enfocado a la solución de problemas y a un aprendizaje muy contextualizado, promoviendo el debate y el aprendizaje entre pares. El resto lo ponen los estudiantes que pueden contribuir al aprendizaje de sus compañeros tanto o más que el profesor mismo.

Margarita Saucedo's curator insight, April 21, 10:51 AM
Andragogía: toma este ámbito de conocimiento
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Teacher resignation letters paint bleak picture of US education

Teacher resignation letters paint bleak picture of US education | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
As teacher resignation letters increasingly go public - and viral - new MSU research indicates teachers are not leaving solely due to low pay and retirement, but also because of what they see as a broken education system.

Via Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
This is a major and global challenge. We are seeing some of the same issues in Alberta. It will take new thinking and leading to transform schools and keep high quality teachers. We have to move past silver bullet solutions, cliche driven thinking, and people who spent little or no time in classrooms.
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How difficult is it finding ourselves within the fog of education?

How difficult is it finding ourselves within the fog of education? | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
Bird Droppings April 13, 2017 How difficult is it finding ourselves within the fog of education?   “The more sand that has escaped the hourglass of life, the clearer we should see through it.” Jean Paul Sartre   As I was looking for thoughts and ideas to start, I actually was going a different direction…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Who we are as a person and a human subject is expressed to the vocation that calls us and we express our self through those callings.
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Teaching: Not for Introverts

Teaching: Not for Introverts | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
In some ways, today’s teachers are simply struggling with what the Harvard Business Review recently termed “collaborative overload” in the workplace. According to its own data, “over the past two decades, the time spent by managers and employees in collaborative activities has ballooned by 50% or more.” The difference for teachers in many cases is that they don’t get any down time; they finish various meetings with various adults and go straight to the classroom, where they feel increasing pressure to facilitate social learning activities and promote the current trend of collaborative education.

This type of schedule and expectation for constant social interaction negates the possibility to psychologically “recharge” in relative solitude, something that’s crucial to many introverts. Lovgren described his lunches alone in the sunshine as a place “to be alone and recharge … to think about big ideas and prepare something worthwhile to say to the kids during discussion.” Spencer wrote that introverted teachers in general may eat alone at lunch because they’re “tired of being ‘on’ all the time … [and] they simply need time to recharge.” Brian Little, a widely acclaimed speaker and psychology professor at Cambridge University, refers to these opportunities to recharge as “restorative activities.” In a 2005 article, he wrote that “for a biogenic introvert who has been protractedly acting out of character as a ‘pseudo-extravert’ the best restorative niche would be one of solitude and reduced stimulation.”  

Via Steve Krogull, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
As an introvert, the key for me was recharge. I turned to reading, writing, hiking, etc. It is not as simple as saying teaching is not for introverts. How many good teachers do we lose because of that flawed reasoning?
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How to Distinguish Fact From Fiction From Your Employees  

How to Distinguish Fact From Fiction From Your Employees   | Education, Curiosity, and Happiness | Scoop.it
As a leader, it's your job to recognize that not everything you hear and read from others is true. Feel confident about the decisions you make. Here's how.

Via donhornsby
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
As a teacher, I experienced the opposite of what is proposed in this article. Too many school managers want people to agree with them.
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donhornsby's curator insight, April 5, 9:52 AM
When your people are doing a great job at providing you important facts or if they’re courageously speaking up about important truths, make a point to reward those people and honor their actions. Don’t just say “Great job getting me all the facts,” but do let them know how their activities empowered you to make a great decision or shaped your leadership responsibility in a way that’s better for the organization at large. Make it relevant and meaningful, and this will reinforce those positive behaviors you appreciate and consistently need from your people. - See more at: https://www.mapconsulting.com/blog/how-to-distinguish-fact-from-fiction-from-your-employees#sthash.fFtAF8nl.dpuf