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Scooped by Vanessa Chaparro
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The Press Dropped the Ball on the Common Core

The Press Dropped the Ball on the Common Core | Education | Scoop.it
During the past couple months, newspapers and cable news have had a field day analyzing Obamacare's troubles. Firestorms over HealthCare.gov or President Obama's unfounded assurances seemingly sprung from out of the blue.
Vanessa Chaparro's insight:

Most of the article deals with how many Americans still do not know exactly what is the purpose of Common Core. Three years later, people and teachers have realized that common core has its hidden ideas. As a future educator, I think it is important to completely understand anything that can affect our jobs. Especially if it involves our abilities or limitations that we will be able to have in our classrooms.

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Rescooped by Vanessa Chaparro from College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders
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Math Standards: Dr. William Schmidt's Presentation

Math Standards: Dr. William Schmidt's Presentation | Education | Scoop.it

Dr. William Schmidt today released key conclusions from his research detailing how the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) for mathematics can potentially improve the performance of U.S. students if implemented appropriately. In an event co-sponsored by Achieve, Chiefs for Change and the Foundation for Excellence in Education, Dr. Schmidt presented a briefing on his work: Common Core State Standards Math: The Relationship Between High Standards, Systemic Implementation and Student Achievement. Download the PowerPoint.


Via Mel Riddile
Vanessa Chaparro's insight:

Common Core is a topic that has been in the news a lot lately because it has promises and flaws that are beginning to show. Yes it is nice to have the same curriculum being taught on the east and west coast of the U.S. , but that is not sufficient because not every teacher may have had the proper training. Even if mathematics is standarized, it does not mean that students will be standarized to intake the information. Some students like math and those will succeed no matter what level they are taught. Math standards will however establish a descent level to seem appropriate for the general student.

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Rescooped by Vanessa Chaparro from Common Core Online
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CCSS Instructional Shifts in Elementary Reading - practical steps

CCSS Instructional Shifts in Elementary Reading - practical steps | Education | Scoop.it

Instructional shifts for the CCSS are coming. What should we keep? What might we add? What can we ditch? (#education CCSS Instructional Shifts in Elementary Reading - By Janice McClureInstructional shifts for the CCSS ...


Via Darren Burris
Vanessa Chaparro's insight:

This article deals with the reading aspect of the common core in elementary school and what should be kept, added, or taken away. I can see how independent reading in a classroom can be seemed unuseful, but at the same time if feedback is always required on readings, then the student is not reading for pleasure. A student will begin to think that reading is only meant to get something out of it rather than just feeling good about oneself. Strong outcomes are promised with the elementary reading curriculum, but is it worth it to absolutly take away the minor activities that allow students to be independent by making thier own choices without having to give anything back in return?

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Columbia elementary school learns how to 'Move This World' - Baltimore Sun

Columbia elementary school learns how to 'Move This World' - Baltimore Sun | Education | Scoop.it
Baltimore Sun Columbia elementary school learns how to 'Move This World' Baltimore Sun With the help of an organization founded by a Howard County native, students at Longfellow Elementary School in Columbia are learning how to enact social change...
Vanessa Chaparro's insight:

This article truely explains how these students 'move this world' because it builds  student's social skills through movement. Students are able to see kids from other parts of the world move which allows them to see that other kids are also doing what they are doing. These exchanges may be recorded or even seen live by the kids of the other country. I believe this organization is working well as far as globalizing education goes. Students have gained confidence and knowledge about others who are also the sme age but live in a different country. These elementary schoolers are brought together by learning about themselves by expressing themselves and watching others do the same.

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Rescooped by Vanessa Chaparro from :: The 4th Era ::
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Teachers: Why so many kids are flunking final exams in Montgomery County | Washington Post

Teachers: Why so many kids are flunking final exams in Montgomery County | Washington Post | Education | Scoop.it

By Valerie Strauss

Summary by Public Education NewsBlast

 

"In an open letter to the students and parents of Montgomery County, Maryland and the Montgomery County Department of Education, teachers in the math department at Poolesville High School explain what they see as the systemic reasons behind widespread exam failures in their content area by students (letter reprinted by Valerie Strauss in The Washington Post). The failures proceed from policies in place for many years having a cumulative effect, they write. Students have been accelerated through the math curriculum as teachers and principals have been pressured to meet unrealistic targets, with the result that students have gaps in understanding. As many students as possible have been placed in honors math classes, so higher-performing students lack sufficient challenges, and those not in honors find themselves in classes with no peer role models and a culture of failure. The ubiquitous use of calculators in the early grades has resulted in students who lack number sense and basic skills, and thus cannot make the leap to algebra. And Algebra I de-emphasizes algebraic manipulation, leaving students unprepared for Algebra II and beyond. The teachers also recommend that students be required to pass a final exam to receive credit for a course, and teachers be allowed to assign grades that truly reflect mastery of content."


Via Jim Lerman
Vanessa Chaparro's insight:

This is true as a student who went through honors classes, one tends to forget the basic skills needed for many standarized tests. I have experienced this when taking the math placement test for college, I felt that I needed a calculator for problems that when i was in middle school I could compute by hand. As a student gets ahead in math, the student becomes more dependable on the graphing calculator. The calculator also has the capacity of simply giving an answer from inputing a formula. As a student who went to school in Montgomery County, I remember having this issue in high school when it was assumed that AP NSL students could pass the government HSA without studying which is not true. The AP course did not cover some cases and laws that were tested on the HSA.  Even though we may have good teachers in the beginning, we will eventually forget the basics in order to retain the more advanced information.

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