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Rescooped by Steph's Journalism Group 2013 from Education
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Windows tablets in education: They plug right in | ZDNet

Windows tablets in education: They plug right in | ZDNet | Education | Scoop.it
Like any other enterprise, large educational institutions have existing computing infrastructures which are likely built around Windows networks.

Via Courtney Dodge
Steph's Journalism Group 2013's insight:

It is common belief that the most commonly used tablet in the education industry is the IPad. Although this is currently true, things are changing! Education institution are now finding that using windows  8 tablets are far more effective and convient. Unlike IPad, these tablets often link directly to a windows 8 PC and so work can be directly transferred quickly and easily. While IPad definetly has some cool gadgets on it, having a windows 8 tablet is literally like carrying around your computer. This makes it far more user friendly (as most of us already know how to use a PC) and it eliminates the fuss of having to get the work off your ipad. 

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Courtney Dodge's curator insight, October 7, 2013 1:13 PM

It is common belief that the most commonly used tablet in the education industry is the IPad. Although this is currently true, things are changing! Education institution are now finding that using windows  8 tablets are far more effective and convient. Unlike IPad, these tablets often link directly to a windows 8 PC and so work can be directly transferred quickly and easily. While IPad definetly has some cool gadgets on it, having a windows 8 tablet is literally like carrying around your computer. This makes it far more user friendly (as most of us already know how to use a PC) and it eliminates the fuss of having to get the work off your ipad. 

Courtney Dodge's curator insight, October 7, 2013 1:14 PM

It is common belief that the most commonly used tablet in the education industry is the IPad. Although this is currently true, things are changing! Education institution are now finding that using windows  8 tablets are far more effective and convient. Unlike IPad, these tablets often link directly to a windows 8 PC and so work can be directly transferred quickly and easily. While IPad definetly has some cool gadgets on it, having a windows 8 tablet is literally like carrying around your computer. This makes it far more user friendly (as most of us already know how to use a PC) and it eliminates the fuss of having to get the work off your ipad.

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GCSE results: Schools end up teaching to the test rather than improving subject knowledge, warns headteachers' leader

GCSE results: Schools end up teaching to the test rather than improving subject knowledge, warns headteachers' leader | Education | Scoop.it
Schools are teaching to the test during GCSE years rather than concentrating on improving their pupils' subject knowledge, a headteachers' leader warned today.

Via Courtney Dodge
Steph's Journalism Group 2013's insight:

Due to the previous low marks of students in the Cambridge, GCSE results, teachers are now trying their best to improve them. They are however, going about this the wrong way. Teachers are now teaching for the exam and not  for the knowledge and understanding of the subject. Not only is this causing student to resent takin certain subject, but it is also not technically forming part of their education as much of the information taught is forgetten shortly after the exam. Teachers should encourage students to have an understanding of the information, not simply a knowledge of it.


 

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Courtney Dodge's curator insight, October 7, 2013 1:58 PM

Due to the previous low marks of students in the Cambridge, GCSE results, teachers are now trying their best to improve them. They are however, going about this the wrong way. Teachers are now teaching for the exam and not  for the knowledge and understanding of the subject. Not only is this causing student to resent takin certain subject, but it is also not technically forming part of their education as much of the information taught is forgetten shortly after the exam. Teachers should encourage students to have an understanding of the information, not simply a knowledge of it.

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Science centres seek to address the crisis in education | West Cape News

Science centres seek to address the crisis in education | West Cape News | Education | Scoop.it
03.09.2013 The lack of science laboratories at schools in the Western Cape is challenge the University of the Western Cape is helping to address, opening four new science centres at schools in Mitchell’s Plain on Monday.
Steph's Journalism Group 2013's insight:

I agree with the fact that having a lack of science laboratories is a huge disadvantage to the schools in the Western Cape, the schooling system, the students as well the as the future overall pass rate at the end of each year.

 

I believe that the opening of the new science centres at the schools will help the student’s immensely with this subject because of the lack of supplies and facilities that they are struggling to learn with in Science classes at this time. This is a step forward in what the country should be trying to do, one step at a time, even if it is in small parts of the education system. One department at a time is better than nothing and no progress at all. 

 

- Tyler Whilshire Duncan

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Conduct Nationwide School Census- Jonathan Tells Minister Of Education - Edification

Conduct Nationwide School Census- Jonathan Tells Minister Of Education - Edification | Education | Scoop.it
President Goodluck Jonathan on Monday directed the Federal Ministry of Education to conduct a nationwide school census by November 2013 to aid proper planning in the nation’s education sector. Mr.
Steph's Journalism Group 2013's insight:

This article tackles the issues of education in countries like Nigeria. It raised issue based on the lack of skills development there is available for the youth and ways in which Nigeria can collaborate with countries like America to get the resources needed to help develop their education system. Finacial offers have been made by the Prime Minister of Britian to help Nigerias education system get to the level in which it needs to be at. President Goodluck Jonathen made it his priority to ensure that a census be conducted in Nigerain education.

 

This artilce is a great read in that it speaks of the ways in which education can be improved through the assistance of  Educational Departments and partntering with other countries. It is a well written article with journalistic standards and research

Thina Hlatshwayo

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Mommie Dearest: Don't Turn Public School Vs. Private School Into A Battle In The Mommy Wars

Mommie Dearest: Don't Turn Public School Vs. Private School Into A Battle In The Mommy Wars | Education | Scoop.it
This week, many kids, including my own, are headed back to school. And, like anything parenting-related, school brings along with it its own heaping pile of
Steph's Journalism Group 2013's insight:

The above article speaks of issues concerning children in private vs public schools and how mothers are concerned with the education levels. It is a good article in that it's autobiographical because we get the point of view of different women and how they are affected with the issue.

 

It aims to lure peoples attemtion espically women by publishing their point of view and their arguement on the issue or battle between private and public schools.

 

The article can however be improved through applying more journalistic aspects and more research as it doesn's seem to have much supporting substance and the structure is more of a blog than an article.

Thina Hlatshwayo

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Public Schools Are Failing, And That's A Healthy Sign For Good Teachers

Public Schools Are Failing, And That's A Healthy Sign For Good Teachers | Education | Scoop.it
The tide is turning on teacher tenure.
Steph's Journalism Group 2013's insight:

The following article speaks of the failures of the learning system that's causing teachers to want to move into higher advanced and better paying schools. The need for good teachers becomes a necessity when the system and lack of good teachers is lost to overseas schools. 

 

Due to the failing system teachers of education just like in businesses teachers are searching for greener pastures to further their teaching environment. The reforms being made in schools are making it difficult for good teachers to stick around as well as the learners.

 

It's a thought provoking article in that it looks at the teachers point of view and how the education is failing them and the changes that need to occur to secure our teachers across the board.

Thina Hlatshwayo

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3 Hawaii public schools earn National Blue Ribbon award

3 Hawaii public schools earn National Blue Ribbon award | Education | Scoop.it
Blanche Pope Elementary, Nuuanu Elementary, and Waikiki Elementary schools have been named 2013 National Blue Ribbon Schools for their outstanding performance and improvement efforts.
Steph's Journalism Group 2013's insight:

The above article is a great read in that it speaks about the positive outcomes of education in three elementary schools in Hawaii as well the government benefits that these children get.

 

Children who come from poor backgrounds are offered the chances to learn though financial assistance and awards are offered to schools that perform the best. Schools that are under achieving make it an effort to rise to the top with all the other schools that are doing well.

 

Its a well witten article and takes a different approach on education compared to all the latest news that we've been hearing about the issues in the education system. It shows that there is still hope within the education system in other countries and small islands such as Hawaii. Well written story that provides great intel information on the schools achievements and benefits.

Thina Hlatshwayo

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Crisis in SA schools

Crisis in SA schools | Education | Scoop.it

Startling statistics show huge disparities between provinces when it comes to education.

 

Principal Bonginkosi Gumede is not keen to admit it, but he is all out of ideas. Too many girls in his rural KwaZulu-Natal school do not complete their education – and after eight years of trying various interventions, he now expects that to be the case this year, and the next, and probably the year after that.

"We have lots of girls who fall pregnant here," says Gumede. "Some drop out for six months, then they come back, but most do not come back. They become mothers, they stay at home, they never learn more."

In 2012, Gumede's school had 814 pupils. Seventy of them were pregnant during the year. Of those, 26 were under the age of consent, 16 years.


Via Andrew van Zyl, Daniella Broomberg
Steph's Journalism Group 2013's insight:
Daniella Broomberg's insight:

An interesting correlation between provinces, education and socio-economic conditions.

 

Statistics show that there are enormous disparities between the health and well-being of school children in differnet provinces. This reinstates a belief of mine that norms and standards must be implemented on a national level. Each province should look towards a target of educational standards, specefific to their provincial needs.

 

It's depressing to read these statistics, but the alternative of choosing ignorance is simply not an option.

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Brandon Yates's curator insight, October 1, 2013 5:56 AM

Some mind-blowing statistics on display here. It is really sad to see that a lot of girls in this rural KwaZulu-Natal school do not complete their education. Young girls who are pregnant(some below the age of cinsent) as well as a significant amount of young ladies who are dropping out after 6 months is quite disturbing and should be a major area of concern for the education department, especially if cases such as this are common amongst rural schools in Natal and throughout South Africa.

Daniella Broomberg's curator insight, October 6, 2013 9:49 AM

An interesting correlation between provinces, education and socio-economic conditions.

 

Statistics show that there are enormous disparities between the health and well-being of school children in differnet provinces. This reinstates a belief of mine that norms and standards must be implemented on a national level. Each province should look towards a target of educational standards, specefific to their provincial needs.

 

It's depressing to read these statistics, but the alternative of choosing ignorance is simply not an option.

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Daily Maverick :: Neville Alexander - a linguistic revolutionary

Daily Maverick :: Neville Alexander - a linguistic revolutionary | Education | Scoop.it

He’s been a Robben Island prisoner and more recently one of South Africa’s most eminent educationists. He’s also a linguistic revolutionary.  KHADIJA PATEL lent Neville Alexander an ear. - Alexander is a vocal proponent of multilingualism in education. He acknowledges that his views on language are construed by some as the “idle musings of an out-of-touch eccentric”, but he believes the dominant opinions of multilingualism in education in South Africa suffer from the disposition to see everything through the prism of English. He is quick to clarify that it would be “silly” to be anti-English, but believes the role of South Africa’s African languages must be enhanced to ensure no South African is robbed of democracy.


Via Charles Tiayon, Daniella Broomberg
Steph's Journalism Group 2013's insight:
Daniella Broomberg's insight:

An interesting contrast to the opinion of Prof Jansen. The question of which (if any) national medium of instruction is needed in education. Prof Jansen believes English should be promoted to level the playing field. Neville Alexander disagrees.

 

Alexander believes that low levels of productivity and efficiency can be attributed to the way in which people are forced to communicate in languages they do not understand. Alexander believes South African's are in the habit of "seeing everything through the prism of English." I agree with this, but I am uncertain of how multilingual education will rectify English as a gloabal medium of communication.

 

Alexander believes that we are imprisoned by "neo-apartheid" language policies. In order to rectify this, he believes that English cannot be the de facto official language. He believes children should be taught African languages from a primary level of education in order to enhance South Africa's African languages.

 

The question on my mind, as communicated by Prof Jansen, is whether or not the language of instruction is as pertinent as the quality of teaching?

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Daniella Broomberg's curator insight, October 6, 2013 8:04 AM

An interesting contrast to the opinion of Prof Jansen. The question of which (if any) national medium of instruction is needed in education. Prof Jansen believes English should be promoted to level the playing field. Neville Alexander disagrees.

 

Alexander believes that low levels of productivity and efficiency can be attributed to the way in which people are forced to communicate in languages they do not understand. Alexander believes South African's are in the habit of "seeing everything through the prism of English." I agree with this, but I am uncertain of how multilingual education will rectify English as a gloabal medium of communication.

 

Alexander believes that we are imprisoned by "neo-apartheid" language policies. In order to rectify this, he believes that English cannot be the de facto official language. He believes children should be taught African languages from a primary level of education in order to enhance South Africa's African languages.

 

The question on my mind, as communicated by Prof Jansen, is whether or not the language of instruction is as pertinent as the quality of teaching?

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Time for radical change in education [South Africa]

Time for radical change in education [South Africa] | Education | Scoop.it

[...] Fourth, academics need to rise above the parapets of the ivory towers of teaching and learning. Academia ought to lead the charge in proposing radical change to both content and process of teaching and learning. Why are African languages dying on our watch? Why are our children being denied the wonders of African history, culture and literature?

Why are innovation and experimentation not promoted in our education system from early childhood to tertiary levels? [...]


Via Reitumetse, Firoze Manji, Daniella Broomberg
Steph's Journalism Group 2013's insight:
Daniella Broomberg's insight:

 Mamphela Ramphele is brilliant.

 

In this article she addresses our education crisis in 5 points and provides solutions that can be accomplished through active participations.

 

Ramphele outlines the following problems:

1. A lack of accountability and a culture of impunity in governement

2. Poor policy coherence and implementation

3. The habit of the private sector to act as complacent spectators

4. Academic elitism

5. A low level of proffessionalism in teachers

 

Ramphele addresses each problem with a viable solution, her outlook is positive and embracing. Such an attituide should be seen more in discussions of education in South Africa. I believe she addresses the crucial issues of South African education. The solutions she provides are logical and doable. 

 

She encourages active leadership at all levels, an embracing attituide towards IT infused learning and a focus on African tradition, language and culture. 

 

I wholeheartedly agree that in order to transend the past, our education system must be ACTIVE and INNOVATIVE

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Daniella Broomberg's curator insight, October 6, 2013 8:30 AM

 Mamphela Ramphele is brilliant.

 

In this article she addresses our education crisis in 5 points and provides solutions that can be accomplished through active participations.

 

Ramphele outlines the following problems:

1. A lack of accountability and a culture of impunity in governement

2. Poor policy coherence and implementation

3. The habit of the private sector to act as complacent spectators

4. Academic elitism

5. A low level of proffessionalism in teachers

 

Ramphele addresses each problem with a viable solution, her outlook is positive and embracing. Such an attituide should be seen more in discussions of education in South Africa. I believe she addresses the crucial issues of South African education. The solutions she provides are logical and doable. 

 

She encourages active leadership at all levels, an embracing attituide towards IT infused learning and a focus on African tradition, language and culture. 

 

I wholeheartedly agree that in order to transend the past, our education system must be ACTIVE and INNOVATIVE.

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New anti-bullying rules announced by Department of Education

New anti-bullying rules announced by Department of Education | Education | Scoop.it
Cyber-bullying, homophobic and racist bullying all form part of the Department of Education's new anti-bullying measures. (New anti-bullying rules announced by Department of Education: Cyber-bullying, homophobic and racist bullying a...

Via Courtney Dodge
Steph's Journalism Group 2013's insight:

With the increase in the avaliability of technology, cyber-bullying has also been on the rise. Although this does not directly involve the school, it can lead to effect that cause the people involved to behaive differently in the school environment.

The new anti-bullying rules enfore the schools involvement in the issue and attempt to act against it in anyway they can. However this is a very long shot. Unless the childs education is directly influenced by the cyber-bullying, many may argue that the school has no right to get involved and that it is the responsibility of the students as well as their parents. 

With this in mind, i believe that the new anti-bullying rules will either be embraced by all those involved or completly shunned and abandoned.

 

- Courtney Dodge

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Courtney Dodge's curator insight, September 13, 2013 7:39 AM

With the increase in the avaliability of technology, cyber-bullying has also been on the rise. Although this does not directly involve the school, it can lead to effect that cause the people involved to behaive differently in the school environment.

The new anti-bullying rules enfore the schools involvement in the issue and attempt to act against it in anyway they can. However this is a very long shot. Unless the childs education is directly influenced by the cyber-bullying, many may argue that the school has no right to get involved and that it is the responsibility of the students as well as their parents. 

With this in mind, i believe that the new anti-bullying rules will either be embraced by all those involved or completly shunned and abandoned.

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Weakest pupils 'suffer crisis of confidence in top schools' - Telegraph

Weakest pupils 'suffer crisis of confidence in top schools' - Telegraph | Education | Scoop.it
Parents should avoid sending their less intelligent children to top-performing schools to prevent them languishing at the bottom of the class, researchers warned today.

Via Courtney Dodge
Steph's Journalism Group 2013's insight:

It has been a common belief among many parents that sending your child to a prestigious school is a positive thing. However, if the child is being emotionally traumatised by the fact that they cannot keep up with the other individuals at this school, is this still the case? The research done in this article suggests that children, boys in particular find it hard to cope with being at the bottom half of the class and they may even become emotionally depressed by it. Feeling like you are not good enough is a common issue in today's society and inflicting this on children is even worse. 


- Courtney Dodge

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Courtney Dodge's curator insight, September 23, 2013 12:12 PM

It has been a common belief among many parents that sending your child to a prestigious school is a positive thing. However, if the child is being emotionally traumatised by the fact that they cannot keep up with the other individuals at this school, is this still the case? The research done in this article suggests that children, boys in particular find it hard to cope with being at the bottom half of the class and they may even become emotionally depressed by it. Feeling like you are not good enough is a common issue in today's society and inflicting this on children is even worse. 

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U.S. Department of Education Awards Nearly $32 Million to Local Education Agencies and Community-Based Organizations for Nutrition and Physical Education | U.S. Department of Education

Today, the U.S. Department of Education awarded 60 grants totaling nearly $32 million to Local Education Agencies (LEAs) and community-based organizations (CBOs) under the Carol M. White Physical Education Program (PEP).

Via Courtney Dodge
Steph's Journalism Group 2013's insight:

Physical education is said to be of vital importance to a child education.it is said to aid them in concentration and assist them in feeling better about themselves in general and therefore gaining more self confidence. The US government recently invested $32 million in physical fit ess and nutrition programmed acrothe on country. The question as to weather this money be better spent is one of great controversy. The US is rife with money related issues and spending $32 million on a service that is essentially a personal choice seems a bit excessive.


- Courtney Dodge

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Courtney Dodge's curator insight, October 1, 2013 7:43 AM

Physical education is said to be of vital importance to a child education.it is said to aid them in concentration and assist them in feeling better about themselves in general and therefore gaining more self confidence. The US government recently invested $32 million in physical fit ess and nutrition programmed acrothe on country. The question as to weather this money be better spent is one of great controversy. The US is rife with money related issues and spending $32 million on a service that is essentially a personal choice seems a bit excessive.

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Committee questions special education formula - Albuquerque Business First

Committee questions special education formula - Albuquerque Business First | Education | Scoop.it
Too many schools are identifying students as having special needs in order to obtain more state funding, according to a report by the New Mexico Legislative Finance Committee.

Via Courtney Dodge
Steph's Journalism Group 2013's insight:

It is rather disturbing to think that education institutions are lying about the amount of students with special needs in their school in order to obtain more funding. Not only is it an insult to those students who do infact have special needs, but it is just morally wrong, plain and simple! Recently several schools in New Mexico were found to have abnormally high units and it was later discovered that they did this in order to get the facilities that a special needs child would require installed in their school for free. While i am definetly for the provision of children with special needs in school i think there needs to be more careful accessment done in order to assess the severity of the situation in the particular school

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Courtney Dodge's curator insight, October 7, 2013 1:42 PM

It is rather disturbing to think that education institutions are lying about the amount of students with special needs in their school in order to obtain more funding. Not only is it an insult to those students who do infact have special needs, but it is just morally wrong, plain and simple! Recently several schools in New Mexico were found to have abnormally high units and it was later discovered that they did this in order to get the facilities that a special needs child would require installed in their school for free. While i am definetly for the provision of children with special needs in school i think there needs to be more careful accessment done in order to assess the severity of the situation in the particular school

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Learning World: Still too many Children not Getting an Education

Learning World: Still too many Children not Getting an Education | Education | Scoop.it
This edition of Learning World looks at the UN’s Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) which include getting all the world’s primary aged children into school by 2015 Two years from the deadline, 61 ...
Steph's Journalism Group 2013's insight:

As aspiring Journalist, it is heart-warming to know that there are programmes like this out there, running and aiming to help the less fortunate to get an education, especially because every child deserves an opportunity to be given the chance to learn and give to the world in a positive way.

 

I truly believe that the programme, Forest of Peace is doing this, and is contributing to education, especially to those lives of the orphans’ think that without these kinds of programmes there would be no hope for the less fortunate, and as people who regarding our career have relied a lot on our education and would be no-where without it, would agree that education for everybody is very important, even in the smallest ways. 


-Tyler Wilshire Duncan

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Forest of Peace's curator insight, October 7, 2013 10:08 PM

Forest of Peace is an international non-profit initiative for the balance, understanding and friendship between all cultures, religions, philosophies, economy and compatibility of environment all over the world.

Mission:

Advocacy science & nature: managed & Care Environment - independent to well-being. It is the starting point for our work which is structured around everything that has been said, written or organised on the subject of this "Fluo'

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Malala says that UK girls take education for granted

Malala says that UK girls take education for granted | Education | Scoop.it
Malala Yousafzai, 16, who now attends Edgbaston High School for Girls in Birmingham, said she is having to get used to seeing women go outside without a man.
Steph's Journalism Group 2013's insight:

This story is a great and very inspirational one to read about, especially regarding education. It’s so good to know that there are some people out there still fighting so very hard for their education, to have an education, like this Pakistani girl, Malala did. She is a strong teenager having being shot three times and still believing in what she got shot for so strongly today. It may not be this hard for us particularly but it is important for us to know and realise what other people are going through to get and experience what we are receiving without too much of a fight. As such a young girl, having such high goals and ambitions regarding education and not just for herself but for all young girls and boys is admirable. As aspiring journalists, I think it is important to take note of stories such as these.

 

-Tyler Wilshire Duncan

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Steph's Journalism Group 2013's curator insight, October 8, 2013 5:41 AM

This story is very differnt to the ones usually found on education. It is both inspiring and heartbreaking to see how hard people fight for their education. It is inspiring to know that someone is trying so hard for something that we often take for granted. It is heart breaking to know that we take something for granted that we have that other people try so hard to get. Malala is a very strong, muture teenager. To be shot more than once and still believe in her cause is amazing. I do not think i would have had that kind of strength and perseverance at her age. It is admirable that she has her goals in perspective instead of just worrying about trivial tennager things. 

- Abby Fellows - Smith

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To curb rape, Muslim group calls for end to co-ed schools in India

To curb rape, Muslim group calls for end to co-ed schools in India | Education | Scoop.it
Many Muslims are rejecting the suggestion made by Jamaat-e-Islami Hind and argue that it runs counter to recent trends in the Indian Muslim community.
Steph's Journalism Group 2013's insight:

The above article writes of the issues of segregation amongst females and males in schools in the Islamic culture. It states that co-eduaction should not be allowed and the boys and girls should be thought seperatley. Most people argue that instilling this change would cause major issues for women wanting to further their studies in universities and colleges.

 

The change would only bring about more division amongst men and women and women in turn would be deprived the ability of getting an education that can further assist society in it's development. The article also states that instilling this law will make it difficult for women to be able to be treated equally in the workplace due to the segregation of co-education.

 

The article is however well written and provides and well structured format of the arguement and its points of the issue of co-education in the Muslim culture.

Thina Hlatshwayo

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Super Coder Mom Disrupts K12 Education System With New Online Homeschool Platform, Palomar K12

Super Coder Mom Disrupts K12 Education System With New Online Homeschool Platform, Palomar K12 | Education | Scoop.it
San Diego, CA (PRWEB) September 23, 2013 -- New online learning platform and curriculum, Palomar K12, makes it easy for students and parents to homeschool.
Steph's Journalism Group 2013's insight:

The following article on homeschooling speaks of the ways in which learning has been made much more interesting and engaging through a program called Palomar K12 which aids learners from 0 grade to 12th grade to learn online. 

 

Sheri Wells developed this program with her children and felt the need to share it with other homeschooling parents as well as kids in public school to enable them to learn more from the net than just their usual textbooks which in most cases never get delivered on time. Studying online forms as a skill acquiring tool which involves self-study as well as the guidance of parents.

 

It is a well written article in that it has a target market is speaking more of the developing digital media world. It states what all parents and students would like to know about and the benefits of studying online. It is also a great read for those looking into technological education rather than textbook and classroom situation of leaning.

Thina Hlatshwayo

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Coalition denies change in position over caps on university places

Coalition denies change in position over caps on university places | Education | Scoop.it
Education Minister Christopher Pyne has denied he is planning to renege on a promise not to restore limits on university places, but has ordered a review because he says evidence suggests
Steph's Journalism Group 2013's insight:

The above article speaks on the issue of education and how it's failing it's students. In Australia the levels of pass rates have dropped in high school due to the tests in which students are being meant to do as well as the requirements for university have dropped. The amount of students being enabled to go into university has dropped due to that the fees for support are being cut down. 

 

I find this article very thought provoking in that it blames the school system and the level at which children are being thought as the main cause of faliure and students not being abled to go to university indicating that governemnt and ministers of education need to do more to change the system even though its not easy. 

 

Many eductators in the artilce have their opinion on the issue as well as a video that helps the reader understand the arguement even more and what needs to be done. It's well written and provides evidence and stastitcs on how pass rates have dropped across places like Austrialia and ACT. 

 

Education is failing our youth and the goverment and departments of education need to step up and come up with a strategic plan that will help the struggle of schools and getting into unversities.

Thina Hlatshwayo

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A Year of 1-to-1 in Grade One

A Year of 1-to-1 in Grade One | Education | Scoop.it
Primary teacher & connected educator Kathy Cassidy summarizes 1st year of one-to-one Apple iPads in her grade one classroom. Great details!
Steph's Journalism Group 2013's insight:

The follwing article speaks of the wonders of Ipads in learning and the advantages that have come with the use of the technology. Students are able to study independently and strive to succeed at their own expense.

 

The leaners are able to share knowledge as well as learn about things that are not part of the curriculum which is a great way of advancing education and shows that learners are learning more than what is expected of them.

 

The use of technology in the classroom is a great tool as the worl is moving up with technology and the media world is advancing showing schools that there's more to education than just text books and written work. This way children don't have to fight for computers in that they all have access to the device and are able to share facts and disocover new things while learning the required curriculum.

 

It is a great article on how school systems should advance with technolgy creating a better learning environment.

Thina

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In defiance of schooling stereotypes

In defiance of schooling stereotypes | Education | Scoop.it

So-called 'struggling' schools that nevertheless succeed convey lessons we need to understand.

 

I have spent the past year on a journey around South Africa, chronicling the stories of 19 disadvantaged but top-performing schools across the country —from the barren Northern Cape to the green hills of the Eastern Cape and densely populated townships. Through my camera, I attempted to understand what makes these schools work as well as they do.

On this journey, I have met committed principals such as Phadiela Cooper, Bonginkosi Maphanga and Linda Molefe; dedicated teachers such as Sherron Mukwevho, Scara Nkosi and Rere Tlou; and determined pupils such as Andile Makhowana, Prince Kobedi and Lebogang Mgwanya. 

They opened up to me and my camera, shared their stories and moved me as they also pushed me to reflect on my own perceptions.


Via Andrew van Zyl, Daniella Broomberg
Steph's Journalism Group 2013's insight:
Daniella Broomberg's insight:

Schools That Work is a video series that looks at 19 schools across South Africa that are defying the odds by achieving academic success while serving some of the country's most disadvantaged students. The videos seek to understand and highlight what these schools, and in particular, their leadership, are doing differently. The hope is that these videos can help to educate and inspire other principals and promote school change. The project was commissioned by Jonathan Jansen, Vice Chancellor at the University of the Free State. The videos are being produced and directed by filmmaker Molly Blank.

 

In this article, Molly Blank discusses her experiences while filming Schools that Work. What I gathered from her is that strong leadership and pupil determination and willingness to get involved is essential to success. 

 

It's a nice change to see a perspective of the South African education crisis through a different lens. It is equally important to address the positive as it is the negative.

 

I personally believe that a pass rate of 35% as stated by the government is too low. Not only does it encourage compliance and poor student performance but it closes off oppurtunities to access tertiary education and for students to become active participants in their communities by furthering their education.

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Daniella Broomberg's curator insight, October 6, 2013 10:00 AM

Schools That Work is a video series that looks at 19 schools across South Africa that are defying the odds by achieving academic success while serving some of the country's most disadvantaged students. The videos seek to understand and highlight what these schools, and in particular, their leadership, are doing differently. The hope is that these videos can help to educate and inspire other principals and promote school change. The project was commissioned by Jonathan Jansen, Vice Chancellor at the University of the Free State. The videos are being produced and directed by filmmaker Molly Blank.


In this article, Molly Blank discusses her experiences while filming Schools that Work. What I gathered from her is that strong leadership and pupil determination and willingness to get involved is essential to success. 


It's a nice change to see a perspective of the South African education crisis through a different lens. It is equally important to address the positive as it is the negative.


I personally believe that a pass rate of 35% as stated by the government is too low. Not only does it encourage compliance and poor student performance but it closes off oppurtunities to access tertiary education and for students to become active participants in their communities by furthering their education.

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Not even colonial born: England, the English and the problem of education in South Africa by Jonathan Jansen

Not even colonial born: England, the English and the problem of education in South Africa by Jonathan Jansen | Education | Scoop.it

Jonathan Jansen delivers the 2013 English Academy’s Percy Baneshik Memorial Lecture at the UFS campus.


"In his speech Not even colonial born: England, the English and the problem of education in South Africa,' Prof Jansen addressed the dilemma of the politics of language in both school and university education today.

Talking about the dominance of English in schools, Prof Jansen said it is the language of choice because indigenous languages are so poorly taught. "Simply learning in your mother tongue is absolutely no guarantee of improved learning gains in school. The problem is not the language of instruction; it is the quality of teaching, the knowledge of curriculum and the stability of the school."

Prof Jansen told the audience in the CR Swart Hall that Afrikaans-exclusive, or even Afrikaans-dominant white schools represent a serious threat to race relations in South Africa. "You simply cannot prepare young people for dealing with the scars of our violent past without creating optimal opportunities in the educational environment for living and learning together."


Via Andrew van Zyl, Daniella Broomberg
Steph's Journalism Group 2013's insight:
Daniella Broomberg's insight:

Prof Jansen offers an interesting perspective that strips down the problem of education in South Africa to the issue of language. He believes there are disparities between those who are fluent in English and those who speak indigenous languages. In order to achieve an inclusive democracy, Prof Jansen believes the issued behind the use of English as a medium of instruction need to be openly discussed. I agree with his belief that English is suitable as a medium of instruction but in order to secure its success, it must be incorporated in learning as early as possible. It is also essential that our education system produces competetent citizens that can 'speak-back' in a variety of languages. 

 

It seems to me, like the introduction of English as a national medium of instruction will offer great benefits if offered correctly but must address many disparities in order to do so. Moreover, I strongly agree with Prof Jansen's notion that our education crisis is rooted in a low quality of teaching, not in the language of instruction.

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Andrew van Zyl's curator insight, October 4, 2013 3:06 AM

Here is the full text of the "lecture that caused all the trouble" kindly reprinted by Rapport. UFS itself has provided the full text here as well, if you want a nice Word doc version.

Daniella Broomberg's curator insight, October 6, 2013 7:47 AM

Prof Jansen offers an interesting perspective that strips down the problem of education in South Africa to the issue of language. He believes there are disparities between those who are fluent in English and those who speak indigenous languages. In order to achieve an inclusive democracy, Prof Jansen believes the issued behind the use of English as a medium of instruction need to be openly discussed. I agree with his belief that English is suitable as a medium of instruction but in order to secure its success, it must be incorporated in learning as early as possible. It is also essential that our education system produces competetent citizens that can 'speak-back' in a variety of languages. 

 

It seems to me, like the introduction of English as a national medium of instruction will offer great benefits if offered correctly but must address many disparities in order to do so. Moreover, I strongly agree with Prof Jansen's notion that our education crisis is rooted in a low quality of teaching, not in the language of instruction.

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Innovation and Education: Young Serial Entrepreneur sets out to Transform South Africa’s Education System

Innovation and Education: Young Serial Entrepreneur sets out to Transform South Africa’s Education System | Education | Scoop.it
Coined by CNN.com as one of Africa’s Marissa Mayers, Rapelang Rabana is founding CEO of Yeigo Communications and ReKindle Learning. Yeigo is credited with creating ground-breaking applications and ...

Via Daniella Broomberg
Steph's Journalism Group 2013's insight:
Daniella Broomberg's insight:

 Rapelang Rabana is another strong believer that technology has a critical role to play in solving Africa's education problems. Rabana is the CEO of a company called ReKindle Learning.  

 

ReKindle Learning is an innovative technology-driven education company seeking to use and integrate the power of mobile and internet technology to improve and complement learning for students and corporate employees.

 

I like the idea to solve our education crisis with an increase or improvement in technology, but I'm not sure that this is a realistic or even a crucial goal. However, if implememnted correctly it could move towards active change. Still - I can't help feeling that their are other more desperate issues to attend to with regard to education. Teacher accountability, educational infrastructure and government policy to name but a few. 

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Daniella Broomberg's curator insight, October 6, 2013 8:50 AM

 Rapelang Rabana is another strong believer that technology has a critical role to play in solving Africa's education problems. Rabana is the CEO of a company called ReKindle Learning.  


ReKindle Learning is an innovative technology-driven education company seeking to use and integrate the power of mobile and internet technology to improve and complement learning for students and corporate employees.


I like the idea to solve our education crisis with an increase or improvement in technology, but I'm not sure that this is a realistic or even a crucial goal. However, if implememnted correctly it could move towards active change. Still - I can't help feeling that their are other more desperate issues to attend to with regard to education. Teacher accountability, educational infrastructure and government policy to name but a few. 

 

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Chicago Public Schools Mandates Sexual, Health Education For ...

Chicago Public Schools Mandates Sexual, Health Education For ... | Education | Scoop.it
Chicago Public Schools Mandates Sexual, Health Education For Kindergarten.

Via Courtney Dodge
Steph's Journalism Group 2013's insight:

Kindergarden is meant to be a time for play and development, however Chicago is now enforcing a new, rather controversial, subject. From the age of 5, children will now have a lesson on sexual health and education.

Learning about sexual development in the classroom not only goes against may traditions but also exposes children at a very young age to things that, for the most part, they do not need to be concerned with. 

I believe that the learning of topics such as sexuality, innapropriate touching, body parts etc. should be dealt with by the parents or gardians of that child in a way that they see fit. This newly introduced system robs parents of doing so and in turn interrupt specific traditions or morals that they might have. 

 - Courtney Dodge
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Courtney Dodge's curator insight, September 13, 2013 8:55 AM

Kindergarden is meant to be a time for play and development, however Chicago is now enforcing a new, rather controversial, subject. From the age of 5, children will now have a lesson on sexual health and education.

Learning about sexual development in the classroom not only goes against may traditions but also exposes children at a very young age to things that, for the most part, they do not need to be concerned with. 

I believe that the learning of topics such as sexuality, innapropriate touching, body parts etc. should be dealt with by the parents or gardians of that child in a way that they see fit. This newly introduced system robs parents of doing so and in turn interrupt specific traditions or morals that they might have. 

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28.5 million conflict-hit children denied education: UN News - By indiaonline.in

28.5 (28.5 million conflict-hit #children denied #education: #UN. http://t.co/NJ34I1OGJC)

Via Courtney Dodge
Steph's Journalism Group 2013's insight:

A recent report by the United Nations shows that 28.5 million children are without education due to conflict happening in their contries. This shocking figure proves that education is not at the forefront of everyones mind. Education should be encouraged and motivated and should have the backing of the governement. The conflict, war or disaster in many countires of today is preventing the leaders of tomorrow from being well rounded, educated individuals and in so doing is stunting the growth of our world. 

 

- Courtney Dodge

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Courtney Dodge's curator insight, September 24, 2013 7:54 AM

A recent report by the United Nations shows that 28.5 million children are without education due to conflict happening in their contries. This shocking figure proves that education is not at the forefront of everyones mind. Education should be encouraged and motivated and should have the backing of the governement. The conflict, war or disaster in many countires of today is preventing the leaders of tomorrow from being well rounded, educated individuals and in so doing is stunting the growth of our world.