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Rescooped by Steph's Journalism Group 2013 from Education
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How a Radical New Teaching Method Could Unleash a Generation of Geniuses

How a Radical New Teaching Method Could Unleash a Generation of Geniuses | Education | Scoop.it
Students in Matamoros, Mexico weren't getting much out of school -- until a radical new teaching method unlocked their potential.

 

Mitra’s work has roots in educational practices dating back to Socrates. Theorists from Johann Heinrich Pestalozzi to Jean Piaget and Maria Montessori have argued that students should learn by playing and following their curiosity.

 

Einstein spent a year at a Pestalozzi-inspired school in the mid-1890s, and he later credited it with giving him the freedom to begin his first thought experiments on the theory of relativity.

 

Google founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin similarly claim that their Montessori schooling imbued them with a spirit of independence and creativity.

 


Via Gust MEES, Lynnette Van Dyke, Daniella Broomberg
Steph's Journalism Group 2013's insight:
Daniella Broomberg's insight:

I really enjoyed this article. Finally a postivive slant on education that provides teachers with a way of improving and changing the way they interact with students. I wholeheartedly agree with the notion that as the world changes and expects different qualities and skills from students, so too must the education system reform. 

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Daniella Broomberg's curator insight, October 15, 2013 10:44 AM

I really enjoyed this article. Finally a postivive slant on education that provides teachers with a way of improving and changing the way they interact with students. I wholeheartedly agree with the notion that as the world changes and expects different qualities and skills from students, so too must the education system reform. 

Karla Luetzow's curator insight, October 16, 2013 11:22 AM

 

The main focus of this article is discovering the most effective way to learn. In Mexico, a school José Urbina López Primary School 

 changed their curriculum and allowed children the freedom to explore and learn on their own. The new curriculum was modeled after Sugata Mitra’s “school in the cloud.” In today’s age of constant information, “school in the cloud” challenged if a computer can teach students as well as a teacher.

 

I found this article incredibly intriguing. The model of education has been the same since the 1800’s. A teacher instructs a classroom of pupils with routine tests to analyze  each student's progress. I have heard of online high schools and college classes, but the idea that seven year olds can learn on their own astonishes me. I never even thought of changing the standard teacher-student classroom in elementary school.  Replacing a teacher with a computer is an extraordinary idea for the future. It is very difficult to imagine. However, our society is changing with this new technology. Therefore, it makes sense to me that our education system should change along with it.

 

Most people would agree that it is easier to learn material that one finds interesting. The type of learning in this article plays into this strength. I wonder if this type of learning would work in an area with distractions such as television, video games, and cell phones. I would be interested to see if the outcome would show the same positive results. I do not think it would. 

 

 This article ties in with the TedTalk by Sugata Mitra. To further learn about this type of learning, I suggest watching the video

 

 http://www.npr.org/2013/06/21/179015266/how-much-can-children-teach-themselves

 

AnnKatherine Brito's curator insight, April 3, 2014 11:59 AM

Students in control of their own education. This is amazing! Will this revolutionize education?

Rescooped by Steph's Journalism Group 2013 from Education
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New study reveals most important skills for students

New study reveals most important skills for students | Education | Scoop.it
Research indicates Microsoft Office applications rank 3 of 20 top in demand skills for high-growth, high-pay careers.

Via Gust MEES, Daniella Broomberg
Steph's Journalism Group 2013's insight:
Daniella Broomberg's insight:

Interestingly, this articel does highlight the mportance of technological skills but emphasizes that 'soft skills' like communication  are equally important to hireability. It is important that students do not base their education on a technological knowledge that may not neccecarily guarentee them a job in the future. The education system needs to be integrated between soft and hard skills that teach students how to interact successfully with technology AND people.

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Gust MEES's curator insight, October 15, 2013 9:24 AM

 

The only software package called out within the top 20 skills across all occupations is Microsoft Office, explicitly required in 15 percent of high-growth, high-salary positions. Microsoft Office is No. 3 on the list of skills most required, and Microsoft PowerPoint and Word are No. 11 and No. 13 most required skills.


Daniella Broomberg's curator insight, October 15, 2013 10:33 AM

Interestingly, this articel does highlight the mportance of technological skills but emphasizes that 'soft skills' like communication  are equally important to hireability. It is important that students do not base their education on a technological knowledge that may not neccecarily guarentee them a job in the future. The education system needs to be integrated between soft and hard skills that teach students how to interact successfully with technology AND people.