education
Follow
Find
16 views | +0 today
 
Rescooped by Sarah-Jane Davies from E-Learning and Online Teaching
onto education
Scoop.it!

10 things I love about using iPad's in my classroom

10 things I love about using iPad's in my classroom | education | Scoop.it
Introducing one-to-one iPad's into classrooms has become one of the hottest topics of conversation. I thought I would share with you the benefits I see of this new form of technology in schools. Th...

Via Dennis T OConnor
Sarah-Jane Davies's insight:

The introduction of iPads into the classroom is a very controversial topic. Many people believe that it is not suitable for school children. For examlpe, people say that children lose their ability to write since they are no longer using pens or paper. However, this article fives many exampls of why it is actually a positive thing. The article is fun to read since it is written in a concise llist and contains interesting cartoon pictures at each point. Each point is also extended by reasons and examples of why the specific point is positive.  The viewpoint is legitimate since it is coming from a teacher. The teacher has a good perspective since he deals with children everyday.

more...
Abby Fellows - Smith's curator insight, October 3, 2013 7:05 AM

I loved this article. It broke down ten ways in which iPads are productive in aiding children how to learn. The aid of pictures with headlines and quotes made it enjoyable to read. Instead of one long story it was broken down nicely so that it is easy to retain the information that you read. I particularly enjoyed the insight into the "the risk - taker" aspect of using the iPad. It is great to know that technology is aiding in the education of future generations

Steph's Journalism Group 2013's curator insight, October 4, 2013 3:52 AM

I loved this article. It broke down ten ways in which iPads are productive in aiding children how to learn. The aid of pictures with headlines and quotes made it enjoyable to read. Instead of one long story it was broken down nicely so that it is easy to retain the information that you read. I particularly enjoyed the insight into the "the risk - taker" aspect of using the iPad. It is great to know that technology is aiding in the education of future generations

Steph's Journalism Group 2013's curator insight, October 4, 2013 11:05 AM

Sarah-Jane Davies's insight:

The introduction of iPads into the classroom is a very controversial topic. Many people believe that it is not suitable for school children. For example, people say that children lose their ability to write since they are no longer using pens or paper. However, this article fives many examples of why it is actually a positive thing. The article is fun to read since it is written in a concise list and contains interesting cartoon pictures at each point. Each point is also extended by reasons and examples of why the specific point is positive.  The viewpoint is legitimate since it is coming from a teacher. The teacher has a good perspective since he deals with children every day.

Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Sarah-Jane Davies
Scoop.it!

US education gets low marks: City Year provides better model - The Georgetown Voice

US education gets low marks: City Year provides better model - The Georgetown Voice | education | Scoop.it
US education gets low marks: City Year provides better model
The Georgetown Voice
The dropout rate and lack of quality education are pandemics in the United States. ...
Sarah-Jane Davies's insight:

It is quite surprising to find out that a highly developed country like the USA has large education issues. The drop out rate in public schools in America seems to be astonishingly high. Therefore, South Africa is clearly not the only country who has a large gap between public and private schools. Forunately there are organizations like CityYear who can possibly make the needed change in improving education. This organization benefits both students and teachers. The students will be taught the basic things that they need to know in order to pass. The corps members assist teachers in essential things like lesson plans. The corps members are mostly gap year students and graduates; therefore they are also learning new knowledge by tutoring students. Another positive fact about CityYear is that it is very widespread and even has a site in Johannesburg. Therefore hopefully CityYear will also have a large impact on South Africa's education system.

more...
Steph's Journalism Group 2013's curator insight, October 15, 2013 9:35 AM

It is quite surprising to find out that a highly developed country like the USA has large education issues. The drop out rate in public schools in America seems to be astonishingly high. Therefore, South Africa is clearly not the only country who has a large gap between public and private schools. Fortunately there are organizations like CityYear who can possibly make the needed change in improving education. This organization benefits both students and teachers. The students will be taught the basic things that they need to know in order to pass. The corps members assist teachers in essential things like lesson plans. The corps members are mostly gap year students and graduates; therefore they are also learning new knowledge by tutoring students. Another positive fact about CityYear is that it is very widespread and even has a site in Johannesburg. Therefore hopefully CityYear will also have a large impact on South Africa's education system.

Scooped by Sarah-Jane Davies
Scoop.it!

SA all set for final exams, confirms Umalusi - BDlive

SA all set for final exams, confirms Umalusi - BDlive | education | Scoop.it
SA all set for final exams, confirms Umalusi
BDlive
Jonathan Snyman, a researcher at the South African Institute of Race Relations, said the ratio of maths literacy students to those taking mathematics had gone from 0.9:1 in 2008 to 1.3:1 by 2012.
Sarah-Jane Davies's insight:

With the final Grade 12 exams approaching a large emphasis is made on the quality of South Africa's education levels. Although everyone is ready and prepared for the exams, one cannot ignore certain issues. The National Senior Certificate firstly only requires a 30% in order to pass Grade 12. Many people believe that this percentage is too low. The fact that the ratio of students taking maths literacy to pure maths has increased is a negative thing since the level of difficulty between the subjects is very high. The fact that exam papers were leaked last year is also a negative thing since it results in some people earning a certificate that they may not deserve.

However, it is good that there is a high ratio of markers to students since it means that marking will be more accurate. The fact that more students are writing may also result in more people passing. However, South Africa still has a long way to go in order to increase the quality of education.

more...
Steph's Journalism Group 2013's curator insight, October 15, 2013 9:39 AM

With the final Grade 12 exams approaching a large emphasis is made on the quality of South Africa's education levels. Although everyone is ready and prepared for the exams, one cannot ignore certain issues. The National Senior Certificate firstly only requires a 30% in order to pass Grade 12. Many people believe that this percentage is too low. The fact that the ratio of students taking maths literacy to pure maths has increased is a negative thing since the level of difficulty between the subjects is very high. The fact that exam papers were leaked last year is also a negative thing since it results in some people earning a certificate that they may not deserve.

However, it is good that there is a high ratio of markers to students since it means that marking will be more accurate. The fact that more students are writing may also result in more people passing. However, South Africa still has a long way to go in order to increase the quality of education.

Scooped by Sarah-Jane Davies
Scoop.it!

The Wemstroms: Educate young workers, welcome immigrants - Freeport Journal-Standard

The Wemstroms: Educate young workers, welcome immigrants - Freeport Journal-Standard | education | Scoop.it
The Wemstroms: Educate young workers, welcome immigrants Freeport Journal-Standard The fertility gap is the goofy idea that advanced countries, because of the decline in their birth rates, will run out of young workers to replace the aging baby...
Sarah-Jane Davies's insight:

Thid article deals with two extremes. Namely: overpopulation and increasing underpopulation. The effect of overpopulation is specifically affecting the youth. Many European youth are unable to find jobs simply because they are not available. The other issue is related to underpopulation. Underpopulation can cause advanced countries to not have enough youth to fill jobs. This will ultimately cause a decrease in a country's development rate. Therefore it is important to allow immigrants easy access into countries like the US. Immigrants can be trained and it may result in them working productively. 

more...
Steph's Journalism Group 2013's curator insight, October 15, 2013 9:42 AM

This article deals with two extremes. Namely: overpopulation and increasing under population. The effect of overpopulation is specifically affecting the youth. Many European youth are unable to find jobs simply because they are not available. The other issue is related to under population. Under population can cause advanced countries to not have enough youth to fill jobs. This will ultimately cause a decrease in a country's development rate. Therefore it is important to allow immigrants easy access into countries like the US. Immigrants can be trained and it may result in them working productively

Rescooped by Sarah-Jane Davies from africa development
Scoop.it!

Is the power of parent talk enough to close the school readiness divide? - The Hechinger Report

Is the power of parent talk enough to close the school readiness divide? - The Hechinger Report | education | Scoop.it
The Hechinger Report
Is the power of parent talk enough to close the school readiness divide?
Sarah-Jane Davies's insight:
Education does not begin at school level. Education starts as soon as a child is born. Suskind's method of teaching a child over 300 million words is very effective.  Children can only become smart if their parents speak to them constantly. This occurs because children will then learn how to communicate and listen. These are fundamental aspects of education. It is also important that parents  speak to their child as if they were an adult. Therefore the child will be able to learn difficult words at a much easier and faster rate.  
more...
Sarah-Jane Davies's curator insight, October 3, 2013 8:16 AM

Education does not begin at school level. Education starts as soon as a child is born. Suskind's method of teaching a child over 300 million words is very effective.  Children can only become smart if their parents speak to them constantly. This occurs because children will then learn how to communicate and listen. These are fundamental aspects of education. It is also important that parents  speak to their child as if they were an adult. Therefore the child will be able to learn difficult words at a much easier and faster rate.  

Steph's Journalism Group 2013's curator insight, October 4, 2013 11:12 AM

Education does not begin at school level. Education starts as soon as a child is born. Suskind's method of teaching a child over 300 million words is very effective.  Children can only become smart if their parents speak to them constantly. This occurs because children will then learn how to communicate and listen. These are fundamental aspects of education. It is also important that parents speak to their child as if they were an adult. Therefore the child will be able to learn difficult words at a much easier and faster rate.  

Scooped by Sarah-Jane Davies
Scoop.it!

Matric pass rate under review - Independent Online

Matric pass rate under review - Independent Online | education | Scoop.it
Independent Online
Matric pass rate under review
Independent Online
Pupils having to choose between maths and maths literacy was the best option in preparing pupils for the workplace and higher education.
more...
Sarah-Jane Davies's curator insight, October 4, 2013 10:47 AM

Sarah-Jane Davies's insight: Increasing the required pass rate of 30% would be a positive thing to do since it already a very low requirement. By passing with 30% it means that the students were only able to retain 30% of the information that they had learned. One needs to think about the importance of the other 70%. By having a low pass rate students are not ready for any form of tertiary education. There are also many other aspects of daily life that will not be reached. As stated by Motshekga 98% of the students do not pass with 30%. Therefore the overall results will not be heavily effected by the increase. If the quality of teaching, working levels and determination are improved then there is a possibity that the would not be a decrease in the pass rate. There may even be an increase in the pass rate.

Steph's Journalism Group 2013's curator insight, October 4, 2013 11:01 AM

Sarah-Jane Davies's insight: Increasing the required pass rate of 30% would be a positive thing to do since it already a very low requirement. By passing with 30% it means that the students were only able to retain 30% of the information that they had learned. One needs to think about the importance of the other 70%. By having a low pass rate students are not ready for any form of tertiary education. There are also many other aspects of daily life that will not be reached. As stated by Motshekga 98% of the students do not pass with 30%. Therefore the overall results will not be heavily effected by the increase. If the quality of teaching, working levels and determination are improved then there is a possibity that the would not be a decrease in the pass rate. There may even be an increase in the pass rate.

Scooped by Sarah-Jane Davies
Scoop.it!

350 Pupils Stranded As Central Equatoria School Collapses - AllAfrica.com

350 Pupils Stranded As Central Equatoria School Collapses - AllAfrica.com | education | Scoop.it
350 Pupils Stranded As Central Equatoria School Collapses
AllAfrica.com
A number of pupils expressed concerns about their future following the unexpected collapse of the 60-year old school.
Sarah-Jane Davies's insight:

This article shows people's dedication to education. The unfortunate event of the school collapsing is not stopping the community from rebuilding a new one. This shows that the impotance of education is known even amongst a community that barely have the resources to keep the school going. The fact that children are currently being taught underneath trees only adds to the inspiration. Hopefully the community will be able to get the funds to rebuild the school and that it will be able to withstand heavy rains. However, the fact that the school is partly made of grass and that it was already 60 years old shows that the structure must have been quite strong. Hopefully this communities like this one will be aided by either the government or other organizations to help with global education.

more...
Steph's Journalism Group 2013's curator insight, October 4, 2013 11:02 AM

Sarah-Jane Davies's insight: This article shows people's dedication to education. The unfortunate event of the school collapsing is not stopping the community from rebuilding a new one. This shows that the impotance of education is known even amongst a community that barely have the resources to keep the school going. The fact that children are currently being taught underneath trees only adds to the inspiration. Hopefully the community will be able to get the funds to rebuild the school and that it will be able to withstand heavy rains. However, the fact that the school is partly made of grass and that it was already 60 years old shows that the structure must have been quite strong. Hopefully communities like this one will be aided by either the government or other organizations to help with global education.

Scooped by Sarah-Jane Davies
Scoop.it!

No-fee school review under fire - Independent Online

No-fee school review under fire - Independent Online | education | Scoop.it
Independent Online No-fee school review under fire Independent Online “They (Cubans) were able to improve the literacy rate to 96 percent in just one year through public funding… the mass democratic structures are going against this policy because...
Sarah-Jane Davies's insight:

Motshekga is justified in believing that parent's whose children go to no-fees schools should make donations. If the parent's can afford to buy material things they can certainly afford to make small donations to their child's schools. They would not have to pay an amount that a parent would have to pay for a school that does have to pay school fees. A donation would aid their child's education and therefore it may increase the child's possibility of him or her having a promising future. 

However, there is another side of the story. One needs to ask why donations are needed in the first place. The no-fee schools should have all the basic utilities without help from donations. The government is supposed to fund the schools efficiently. Therefore it seems as though Motshekga could be ignoring the actual problem by focussing on smaller issues.

more...
Steph's Journalism Group 2013's curator insight, October 4, 2013 11:07 AM

Motshekga is justified in believing that parent's whose children go to no-fees schools should make donations. If the parent's can afford to buy material things they can certainly afford to make small donations to their child's schools. They would not have to pay an amount that a parent would have to pay for a school that does have to pay school fees. A donation would aid their child's education and therefore it may increase the child's possibility of him or her having a promising future. 

However, there is another side of the story. One needs to ask why donations are needed in the first place. The no-fee schools should have all the basic utilities without help from donations. The government is supposed to fund the schools efficiently. Therefore it seems as though Motshekga could be ignoring the actual problem by focussing on smaller issues.

Rescooped by Sarah-Jane Davies from E-Learning and Online Teaching
Scoop.it!

How To Start Using iTunes U In The Classroom - Edudemic

How To Start Using iTunes U In The Classroom - Edudemic | education | Scoop.it
Ready to take the plunge and start using iTunes U in the classroom? It's not as scary as you think - and many aren't yet using the tool!

Via Dennis T OConnor
Sarah-Jane Davies's insight:

Technology is advancing continously; therefore it makes sense for educational systems to keep up with technology. This should be done because its is predominately the youth who enjoy advancing with technology. Therefore if more education systems use iTunesU students will be able to learn their work efficiently since they will understand it more easily than a dull textbook. If institutions adopt this new tool it will make vast changes in both the teacher's and students's education. This tool is very easy to use and is more convenient than compiling numerous notes and books. The only downside is that iTunesU is an Apple product. Therefore only those with iPads,iPhones or any other Apple products will be able to use iTunesU. Apple products are not necessarily cheap; therefore not all institutions would be able to use this new handy tool.

more...
Mary Starry's curator insight, September 17, 2013 10:02 PM

Author has lots of links and resources to assist you in preparing an iTunes U course. 

Steph's Journalism Group 2013's curator insight, October 4, 2013 11:09 AM

Sarah-Jane Davies's insight:

Technology is advancing continously; therefore it makes sense for educational systems to keep up with technology. This should be done because its is predominately the youth who enjoy advancing with technology. Therefore if more education systems use iTunesU students will be able to learn their work efficiently since they will understand it more easily than a dull textbook. If institutions adopt this new tool it will make vast changes in both the teacher's and students's education. This tool is very easy to use and is more convenient than compiling numerous notes and books. The only downside is that iTunesU is an Apple product. Therefore only those with iPads,iPhones or any other Apple products will be able to use iTunesU. Apple products are not necessarily cheap; therefore not all institutions would be able to use this new handy tool.

Scooped by Sarah-Jane Davies
Scoop.it!

Teaching vernaculars in school - News24

Teaching vernaculars in school - News24 | education | Scoop.it
Teaching vernaculars in school
News24
Lastly, the only thing that scholars, teachers and fellow South Africans should be advocating for is home literacy not introducing vernaculars to all subjects.
Sarah-Jane Davies's insight:

Sustaining South Africa's vernaculars is very important as it causes heritages to not be forgotten. Therefore, if vernaculars are taught in certain schools this will aid this cause. I wholly agree with Shisinga when he states that other subjects such as Geography should not be taught in vernaculars since it will cause too much disruption. The quality of teaching needs to improve; therefore it needs to be ensured that teachers are well trained. I agree with Shisinga when he states that learners' languages need to also be practiced at home since they spend most of their time at home. Furthermore, Shisinga's idea of graduate students assisting learners in teaching them languages is a very good idea; however implementation will not be easy.

more...
Steph's Journalism Group 2013's curator insight, October 15, 2013 9:37 AM

Sustaining South Africa's vernaculars is very important as it causes heritages to not be forgotten. Therefore, if vernaculars are taught in certain schools this will aid this cause. I wholly agree with Shisinga when he states that other subjects such as Geography should not be taught in vernaculars since it will cause too much disruption. The quality of teaching needs to improve; therefore it needs to be ensured that teachers are well trained. I agree with Shisinga when he states that learners' languages need to also be practiced at home since they spend most of their time at home. Furthermore, Shisinga's idea of graduate students assisting learners in teaching them languages is a very good idea; however implementation will not be easy.

Scooped by Sarah-Jane Davies
Scoop.it!

State of SA's education a concern - BDlive

State of SA's education a concern - BDlive | education | Scoop.it
BDlive
State of SA's education a concern
BDlive
In its latest Global Competitiveness Report, the World Economic Forum rates South African primary schools 132nd out of 144 countries, and 115th in access to primary school education.
Sarah-Jane Davies's insight:

South Africa's education is not in a good state. Considering South Africa's level of development, our primary schools should not be rated 132nd out of 144 countries. Primary schooling forms the basis of education; therefore this does not show a positive future for South Africa. The fact that only 6% of the national budget is spent on education is not good enough. Education is the most important factor in our country since it influences the level of future development. There should also not be a solid divide between dependent and independent schools. By improving the quality of dependent schools South Africa's education will improve as a whole.

more...
Steph's Journalism Group 2013's curator insight, October 15, 2013 9:38 AM

South Africa's education is not in a good state. Considering South Africa's level of development, our primary schools should not be rated 132nd out of 144 countries. Primary schooling forms the basis of education; therefore this does not show a positive future for South Africa. The fact that only 6% of the national budget is spent on education is not good enough. Education is the most important factor in our country since it influences the level of future development. There should also not be a solid divide between dependent and independent schools. By improving the quality of dependent schools South Africa's education will improve as a whole

Scooped by Sarah-Jane Davies
Scoop.it!

Mobile Internet in the Developing World - Flip the Media

Mobile Internet in the Developing World - Flip the Media | education | Scoop.it
Flip the Media Mobile Internet in the Developing World Flip the Media But the students Donner and his research associates studied in Cape Town, South Africa, continue to frequent neighborhood libraries, larger central libraries, and some cybercafés...
Sarah-Jane Davies's insight:

Using the internet as a source of education is vital. Therefore it is a positive thing that internet is being introduced to developing countires through mobile phones. Using mobile networks to access internet is more convenient and buying a phone is cheaper than buying a PC. Having internet in the developing world allows for small businesses to grow and it allows for more diverse citizen journalism. Developing countries also have access to public internet venues; although there are not many places that offer this. 

However, there are a few problems that occur. Using mobile networks causes some cell phones to have slow internet and they easily run out of data or air time. The internet also does not accommodate  for some languages.

more...
Steph's Journalism Group 2013's curator insight, October 15, 2013 9:41 AM

Using the internet as a source of education is vital. Therefore it is a positive thing that internet is being introduced to developing countries through mobile phones. Using mobile networks to access internet is more convenient and buying a phone is cheaper than buying a PC. Having internet in the developing world allows for small businesses to grow and it allows for more diverse citizen journalism. Developing countries also have access to public internet venues; although there are not many places that offer this. 

However, there are a few problems that occur. Using mobile networks causes some cell phones to have slow internet and they easily run out of data or air time. The internet also does not accommodate for some languages

Rescooped by Sarah-Jane Davies from education
Scoop.it!

Matric pass rate under review - Independent Online

Matric pass rate under review - Independent Online | education | Scoop.it
Independent Online
Matric pass rate under review
Independent Online
Pupils having to choose between maths and maths literacy was the best option in preparing pupils for the workplace and higher education.
Sarah-Jane Davies's insight:

Sarah-Jane Davies's insight: Increasing the required pass rate of 30% would be a positive thing to do since it already a very low requirement. By passing with 30% it means that the students were only able to retain 30% of the information that they had learned. One needs to think about the importance of the other 70%. By having a low pass rate students are not ready for any form of tertiary education. There are also many other aspects of daily life that will not be reached. As stated by Motshekga 98% of the students do not pass with 30%. Therefore the overall results will not be heavily effected by the increase. If the quality of teaching, working levels and determination are improved then there is a possibity that the would not be a decrease in the pass rate. There may even be an increase in the pass rate.

more...
Steph's Journalism Group 2013's curator insight, October 4, 2013 11:01 AM

Sarah-Jane Davies's insight: Increasing the required pass rate of 30% would be a positive thing to do since it already a very low requirement. By passing with 30% it means that the students were only able to retain 30% of the information that they had learned. One needs to think about the importance of the other 70%. By having a low pass rate students are not ready for any form of tertiary education. There are also many other aspects of daily life that will not be reached. As stated by Motshekga 98% of the students do not pass with 30%. Therefore the overall results will not be heavily effected by the increase. If the quality of teaching, working levels and determination are improved then there is a possibity that the would not be a decrease in the pass rate. There may even be an increase in the pass rate.

Rescooped by Sarah-Jane Davies from E-Learning and Online Teaching
Scoop.it!

10 things I love about using iPad's in my classroom

10 things I love about using iPad's in my classroom | education | Scoop.it
Introducing one-to-one iPad's into classrooms has become one of the hottest topics of conversation. I thought I would share with you the benefits I see of this new form of technology in schools. Th...

Via Dennis T OConnor
Sarah-Jane Davies's insight:

The introduction of iPads into the classroom is a very controversial topic. Many people believe that it is not suitable for school children. For examlpe, people say that children lose their ability to write since they are no longer using pens or paper. However, this article fives many exampls of why it is actually a positive thing. The article is fun to read since it is written in a concise llist and contains interesting cartoon pictures at each point. Each point is also extended by reasons and examples of why the specific point is positive.  The viewpoint is legitimate since it is coming from a teacher. The teacher has a good perspective since he deals with children everyday.

more...
Abby Fellows - Smith's curator insight, October 3, 2013 7:05 AM

I loved this article. It broke down ten ways in which iPads are productive in aiding children how to learn. The aid of pictures with headlines and quotes made it enjoyable to read. Instead of one long story it was broken down nicely so that it is easy to retain the information that you read. I particularly enjoyed the insight into the "the risk - taker" aspect of using the iPad. It is great to know that technology is aiding in the education of future generations

Steph's Journalism Group 2013's curator insight, October 4, 2013 3:52 AM

I loved this article. It broke down ten ways in which iPads are productive in aiding children how to learn. The aid of pictures with headlines and quotes made it enjoyable to read. Instead of one long story it was broken down nicely so that it is easy to retain the information that you read. I particularly enjoyed the insight into the "the risk - taker" aspect of using the iPad. It is great to know that technology is aiding in the education of future generations

Steph's Journalism Group 2013's curator insight, October 4, 2013 11:05 AM

Sarah-Jane Davies's insight:

The introduction of iPads into the classroom is a very controversial topic. Many people believe that it is not suitable for school children. For example, people say that children lose their ability to write since they are no longer using pens or paper. However, this article fives many examples of why it is actually a positive thing. The article is fun to read since it is written in a concise list and contains interesting cartoon pictures at each point. Each point is also extended by reasons and examples of why the specific point is positive.  The viewpoint is legitimate since it is coming from a teacher. The teacher has a good perspective since he deals with children every day.

Scooped by Sarah-Jane Davies
Scoop.it!

Male and Female Literacy Rates by Country | IndexMundi Blog

Male and Female Literacy Rates by Country | IndexMundi Blog | education | Scoop.it
Most African countries have very low literacy rates, with few exceptions: South Africa, Lesotho, Kenya, and Namibia. This entry was posted in Africa, Argentina, China, Countries, Demographics, Europe, India, Ireland, Italy, ...
Sarah-Jane Davies's insight:

From the article it seems as though Africa is lagging behind in the world literacy rates. It also shows that developing countries are the countries who have the low literacy rates. This always leads to the main global issue: education. Developed countries such as America, Australia and Europe have substantially high literacy rates. This is due to there good structures and wealth. However many developing countries are on the other extreme. This issue is not easy to eradicate and it will unfortunately not happen over night. However, if countries unite and more effort is put in there will definitely be a change.

 

The other issue revolves around the fact that the literacy rates in some countries are not equal amongst men and women. This shows that gender equality is still a massive issue that needs to be solved. Women deserve to be literate just as much as men. However, luckily an issue like this is increasing in awareness. This potentially brings hope to the developing countries since an increase in awareness will drive the action at reducing this issue.

more...
Steph's Journalism Group 2013's curator insight, October 4, 2013 11:08 AM

From the article it seems as though Africa is lagging behind in the world literacy rates. It also shows that developing countries are the countries who have the low literacy rates. This always leads to the main global issue: education. Developed countries such as America, Australia and Europe have substantially high literacy rates. This is due to their good structures and wealth. However many developing countries are on the other extreme. This issue is not easy to eradicate and it will unfortunately not happen overnight. However, if countries unite and more effort is put in there will definitely be a change.

 

The other issue revolves around the fact that the literacy rates in some countries are not equal amongst men and women. This shows that gender equality is still a massive issue that needs to be solved. Women deserve to be literate just as much as men. However, luckily an issue like this is increasing in awareness. This potentially brings hope to the developing countries since an increase in awareness will drive the action at reducing this issue.

Scooped by Sarah-Jane Davies
Scoop.it!

Learning to read in Madagascar - IRINnews.org

Learning to read in Madagascar - IRINnews.org | education | Scoop.it
Learning to read in Madagascar
IRINnews.org
... adult literacy class.
Sarah-Jane Davies's insight:

Illteracy is a serious global problem and continues to thrive, especially in developing countries. It prevents people from getting good jobs and it even hinders their personal life. However, if more schools, as seen in the article, are built for adults illiteracy will decrese. There are many adults, like Marie Louise, who did not have the opportunity to get a simple education when they were younger. Luckily some adults have been given the opportunity by the United Nation Development Programme and NGO's to learn how to read. As it is stated in the article, these programmes allow individuals to learn how to read personal letters and get jobs that they previously could not get. It is also very encouraging to see that certain people are learning simple arithmetic which will help people like fishermen and vendors to create a sufficient income. This article is good in that it focuses on adult education and not educating children which often too much emphasis is made. It is undeniably important for children to be educated; however one should not forget about adults. Hopefully more schools like the one in the article will emerge in order to annihilate the increasing illiteracy rates.

more...
Steph's Journalism Group 2013's curator insight, October 4, 2013 11:10 AM

Illiteracy is a serious global problem and continues to thrive, especially in developing countries. It prevents people from getting good jobs and it even hinders their personal life. However, if more schools, as seen in the article, are built for adults’ illiteracy will decrease. There are many adults, like Marie Louise, who did not have the opportunity to get a simple education when they were younger. Luckily some adults have been given the opportunity by the United Nation Development Programme and NGO's to learn how to read. As it is stated in the article, these programmes allow individuals to learn how to read personal letters and get jobs that they previously could not get. It is also very encouraging to see that certain people are learning simple arithmetic which will help people like fishermen and vendors to create a sufficient income. This article is good in that it focuses on adult education and not educating children which often too much emphasis is made. It is undeniably important for children to be educated; however one should not forget about adults. Hopefully more schools like the one in the article will emerge in order to annihilate the increasing illiteracy rates.

Scooped by Sarah-Jane Davies
Scoop.it!

Rural KZN school gets A+ for pass rates - Mail & Guardian Online

Rural KZN school gets A+ for pass rates - Mail & Guardian Online | education | Scoop.it
Rural KZN school gets A+ for pass rates Mail & Guardian Online Recently I wrote about how the selection of pupils studying either maths or maths literacy is being manipulated by certain schools and provinces in order to boost their matric pass...
Sarah-Jane Davies's insight:

This article shows that South Africa's future education has hope to improve. The fact that over 90% of the pupils pass matric and many of them have distinctions even though the overall conditions of the school are not satisfactory is inspiring. In order to change South Africa's education system the matric pass rate needs to improve. If there are more principals like Dr Ngoyi Mahaye there would be many more positive changes in the entire education system. 

One negative fact about the article is that it should focus more on the pupils. The article focuses too much on the principal's and teachers's dedication. However, their contribution is undenaibly true and positive. There should be more of a focus on the students dedication to achieving their excellent results.

more...
Steph's Journalism Group 2013's curator insight, October 4, 2013 11:11 AM

This article shows that South Africa's future education has hope to improve. The fact that over 90% of the pupils pass matric and many of them have distinctions even though the overall conditions of the school are not satisfactory is inspiring. In order to change South Africa's education system the matric pass rate needs to improve. If there are more principals like Dr Ngoyi Mahaye there would be many more positive changes in the entire education system. 

One negative fact about the article is that it should focus more on the pupils. The article focuses too much on the principal's and teachers's dedication. However, their contribution is undenaibly true and positive. There should be more of a focus on the students dedication to achieving their excellent results.