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Constructive Classroom Rewards to Support Child's Health

Michaela Vila's insight:

Two types of routines that is really predominate and potentially harmful in the classroom is how teachers reward and punish students in the classroom. Too many times teachers use food as a reward or punish and/or use physical activity as a punishment, this creates negative perceptions of food and physical activities.

 

To help promote child's health food should not be used as a reward and physical activity should not be used as a punishment but it should be used as a reward. One specific way to use physical activity as a reward is having a dance party be a reward; this is slightly mentioned in this article but I have linked at the bottom more details and teachers reactions to dance parties. To help make having dance parties become a routine way of rewarding the class, the teacher can create a point system of how the class can get points and have to work as a class to get a certain number of points. This also helps foster the necessary skills for PBL to happen because this forces students to work as a whole group by collaborating and communicating on how to keep the whole class on track as well as establishing conference when there is a problem with the group efforts (e.g. one student reminding another student to behave so they can get points for the dance party). 

 

 

https://www.scholastic.com/teachers/top-teaching/2013/09/dance-party-kindergarten

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Mrs. Terhune's First Grade Site!: Organization

Mrs. Terhune's First Grade Site!: Organization | Education | Scoop.it
Michaela Vila's insight:

This link really addresses all the questions for this project on space, as it shows what kind of spaces to create and materials needed but there are links below that I used to help support my findings and to define the purpose of learning centers. This link shows that a classroom should have separate spaces (centers) for a small group to work with a teacher, computers, literacy, math, science, and writing; also link one adds the need for a whole group area and a listening area, while link two has many more such as an art center. In this original link it shows that students are assigned to a particular activity for the literacy and math center and the other centers are free centers with many activities and games that they can freely pick from. Each activity in the center is put into labeled boxes on shelves with any additional materials needed and students names are on clips that are put on paper plates that are posted on the wall. 

 

Link two gives an amazing detailed descriptions of the purpose of each center and the skills that are gained from each center; this document breaks it down by how centers can help students with sensory, cognitive, emotional, social and physical skills.  For example the art center allows student to use sensory skills through seeing and feeling different materials of art, cognitive skills through decision making and problem solving, emotional skills through expressing their feelings through art, social skills through group activity or side by side play, and physical skills though fine motor development by painting and drawing. 

 

My purpose of having such a variety of centers is to help encourage students to do what they like, as well as encouraging the whole child development by the way students always have engaging activities that they can work on at almost any time and they have challenging activities to learn from that have been personalized and supported by the teacher. All the activities in these centers are changed weekly and the literacy and math center activities are personally assigned to help give students appropriately challenging work. This also creates a resilient worker because students know that when they are done with their work early they are to persist their learning and go to a learning center. Students need to be adaptive, empathetic and flexible (resilient dispositions) because they might not be able to go to the center they want (i.e. too many people are at one center or didn't finish their literacy and/or math center work). The centers forces students to practice resilient skills as they problem solve with the math and science centers and are creative in the art center, as well as the whole time students are using reasoning, communication, and decision making skills to be able to choose and work within a center with other people.  

 

General purpose for each center: 

1) Small Group Area - teachers need an area to help give about four or five students on the same ability level individual attention to help reenforce learning. 

2) Computers - students need to learn 21st centers skills and should have the exposer to computers. 

3) Literacy - students need a reading area to encourage independent reading and to give extra practice. 

4) Math - for students that like math this is an opportunity for extra math and often students need extra practice with math no matter how proficient they are. Also can help encourage STEAM.  

5)Science - encouraging STEAM is now very important even though time for science has be continually minimized. Students need the extra time and encouragement to enjoy and engage in science. The teacher in this original link only had literacy and math centers be centers with required work, but I might include science and writing as well in my classroom. 

6)Writing - it is an important practice and this center would encourage creative writing which is becoming more and more rare in schools. 

7)Listening Center - fun way to practice reading and comprehension (I would include comprehension questions to the recordings). 

8)Art - this is also something becoming rare in schools and I think it is important to try and support any students aspirations to art. 

 

 

Also another mention from this original link is that the seats are in grouped in pods which will help PBL because they are constantly working in groups. I found another link on seating arrangement that I did not link but it suggested using zip-ties to hold desks together. I thought that was a good idea because these pods have a lot of group baskets that can fall through the cracks or as the link says desks can become a mess by being all moved around with the group work. Zip-ties are a ways to create a table to help assist PBL but each student will have their own learning space. 

 

1) http://www.eduplace.com/rdg/res/classroom.html

2)  http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=9&ved=0CGkQFjAI&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.discountschoolsupply.com%2Fcontent%2Flearning_centers.doc&ei=F3pBU5uJOsuksQT77oAI&usg=AFQjCNF1vY64b79DQ7Uow_tla6Mcn1ytEg&sig2=bPncNdn0YyTPlwxTJD77FQ&bvm=bv.64125504,d.cWc



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Routines and Procedures for Managing Your Classroom

Michaela Vila's insight:

So I feel that routines is hardest group of this project to sum up because there are so many routines that go on in the classroom. This is quite a long list of mostly "must have routines" in the classroom, the list is long but limiting! Having all of these routines, plus a few other necessary ones, are all extremely imperative for supporting a classroom that uses a lot of PBL because it is necessary for students to be able to walk around the class and know how to get their materials. With set routines, students know how to move around in the classroom without creating conflicts and will have the access the things they need to anything. This link did not provide steps on how to implement these routines so I found a video page (link one, at bottom) that talks about many of these routines and some additional routines. Also my link on space (link two here) has a lot of pictures that imply how I would implement a lot of these routines on this original link. 

 

Link one has four videos; one about morning routines and the others about attendance and schedules, through out the day routines, and ending the day. The video on morning routines says that the teacher posts the morning routine outside of the classroom so students always know what to do as they walk in. As the student walk in they are to unpack their backpacks (put lunches in a lunch bin, turn in homework and hand in any notes from home), put away backpack and jacket, move their attendance pin (or person) to "present," make sure they have two sharpened pencils, and check the front board for further instruction. The front board will then have instructions about the morning work; I would have morning work already at their desk waiting for them (in my experience this has worked the best). The attendance video says that as students walk in they should mark themselves into the classroom because then it is quick to see who is missing and then the teachers don't have to take the time to check in students individually (in addition to this, for spacial reasoning the markers should be away from the backpacks to avoid major over crowding in the class).

 

For routines through out the day video, most of the video talked about how students leave to and from the class room and how to walk in the halls. When students need to go to the bathroom they are to see if there is a boy bathroom pass or a girl bathroom pass and they are allowed to go to bathroom as long as there is a pass for them and the teacher has not otherwise said no bathrooms; also students are to sign out when they go to the bathroom so they can be thinking about time management and for the teacher to be overseeing their time management. Also when students with special services have to leave the classroom for those services they are to sign themselves out as well. As for when students line up, there should be a specific order to the line that the teacher has created. The front and back of the line should have the students that have not had any behavioral problems because they can help move by the line and don't create problems with holding the door. To help students remember the order the teachers can assign students a number and put a number on a tile on the floor so they know their space in line. 

 

The end of the day video is when they gave a description of all the jobs that students should do because most of the jobs should be done at the end of the day so everyone comes to the class the next morning totally fresh because they have all just helped clean up the classroom. So at the end of the day there will be time for students to do their jobs which can be jobs like pencil monitor, floor monitor, board cleaner, librarian and so on. Then they will grab their homework folders and check their mailbox for any notices that need to go home. Then they will pack up all their belongings and wait in their space in line. 

 

The link two shows how some more specific routines that would be carried out. For example with pencil sharpening, students are to not bother sharpening their pencil and should just get a new sharp pencil from the pencil box and return unsharpened pencils in the unsharpened pencil box. Also when students miss work they can use the morning time to go over to the baskets (individual baskets for each day of the week) that have all the work that students did that day; I would ask the students to go get their work themselves and then come to me for further instructions. This tactic is also beneficial if someone has to leave early for the day without notice or if someone is going to be out for the next few days because then students can still grab all the work they need and can just ask the teacher for the extra details. I think that they most important routine that link two had was the mailboxes. Students need mailboxes to get their work back and teachers need a mailboxes to receive homework and letters from home. Students will know to turn in their mail to their teacher and to go pick up mail from their mailbox as part of the morning routine; part of the end of the day routines will include someone being a mailman and putting students work into their mailboxes so they can be collected the next morning. 

 

All of this helps the class be more functional for PBL because students will know all the routines of when it is okay to get out of their desks and will know where recourses are. When students feel what they need to do is outside of all the normal routines and expectations then they can signal to the teacher that they are in need of assistance. 

 

1) http://www.scholastic.com/browse/media.jsp?id=268

2) http://mrsterhune.blogspot.com/search/label/Organization

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Setting Expectations on the First Day of School

Setting Expectations on the First Day of School | Education | Scoop.it
By setting clear expectations on day 1, students understand what you're looking for from the start. Allowing them to help set expectations increases their engagement and gives them sense of ownership over classroom rules.
Michaela Vila's insight:

Trying to look for ways to establish these dispositions in the class room, I found this video on how the teacher sets expectations in the classroom with the students on day one. First the teacher tells the students about a classroom management device he uses called "give me five." When the teacher says "give me five" students are expected to keep hands to themselves, keep their feet still, be silent, have their eyes on the speaker, and have a ready mind. I thought this was useful because this is a really basic expectation of the students to help keep the class calm before they have begun to do any work; it is simple, easy to learn, and has a catchy phrase to help students remember the five things, so even though this isn't talking about dispositions I would like to use this idea to just create the initial classroom management tactic and then focus on generating the dispositions that are important for our class. 

 

After the teacher taught them "give me five," he had the students work in groups to come up with rules that they think are important in the classroom. With the group's work, they had a whole class discussion about what are the most important rules that they came up with. To tailor this so it focuses on dispositions rather than rules, I would have the class discussion talk about what those rules means and what dispositions they are connected to. I would let this conversation help raise all the dispositions that I want to have in the classroom. The rules that they create are usefully examples of what this dispositions mean and if they come up with rules that support more dispositions than I had originally in mind, I will still add that those dispositions to the list that year because it is important that children feel that they are creating the rules (allows them to be more engaged and feel safe) but I will make sure that they still are mentioning all the dispositions that I want to have in the classroom. 

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Educational Leadership:Building a Community for Learning:Teaching Students to Be Peer Mediators

Educational Leadership:Building a Community for Learning:Teaching Students to Be Peer Mediators | Education | Scoop.it
Michaela Vila's insight:

I found this article as following up to the class management article on inclusive classrooms, because this is all new to me. This article makes it more clear to me how to do this peer mediators. Now only does there need to peer relations but everyone in the classroom must be apart of the "peacemaker program" and it starts with all students learning how to negotiate conflict which is a very important life skill. I think that this a great way to create a classroom climate for inclusive classrooms and regular classrooms. My insight major from this is that maybe all classrooms should have these peer mediators because it seems to stimulate many important life skills! 

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Want Better Project-Based Learning? Use Social and Emotional Learning

Want Better Project-Based Learning? Use Social and Emotional Learning | Education | Scoop.it
Today's guest blogger is Thom Markham, a psychologist, educator, and president of Global Redesigns, an international consulting organization focused on project-based learning, social-emotional learnin
Michaela Vila's insight:

Before reading this article most of the time when I thought about or visualized social-emotional education, I saw it as something totally separate from normal classroom instructions and mostly revolving around a class meeting, where students work out their own problems. After reading this article I realized that social-emotional learning can very easily be apart of the normal classroom instruction, as it parallels with PBL very nicely and it does not have to be the students working out their own problems because social-emotional education can also be about teaching social-emotional issue from around the world that do not have to directly effect the student. Using PBL can facilitate social-emotional learning into the classroom because teachers can provide students with projects that moves them emotionally to want to learn more or be active about a topic and it can teach them how to live amongst this highly globally socialized world. I learned how these type of projects can establish a "drive and thrive" culture where students feel emotionally driven to thrive in this social world by using PBL and because of this social-emotional education does not have to be limited to class meetings and helping students through their own problems. 

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How to Become a Socially Inclusive School

How to Become a Socially Inclusive School | Education | Scoop.it
In its comprehensive case study report on socially inclusive schools, Special Olympics'
Project UNIFY identified the common factors across schools that had created a bridge from social inclusion pro
Michaela Vila's insight:

One thing that I have been particularly interested in this semester in learning about how to effectively handle an inclusive classroom. I thought this article was very interesting because it might suggest that using project-based learning can help inclusive classrooms be more socially oriented. The article says that activities are to be interesting to the student and student centered, which are some of the main attributes of project-based learning. I thought that suggestion #5 was very insightful because it changed my idea that in an inclusive classroom we should focus on having students help other students with disabilities. Now I see that we should find ways to have everyone play an active part in the learning process; if everyone feels like they have their own contributing part in the classroom then there is a more positive social environment created in this inclusive classroom rather than the inclusive students feeling like they have to always be helped. I liked this articles idea on how to use the buddy system. I liked that using the buddy system didn't have to use pairs, it could use trios as well. In my future classroom, if I had a lot of students with disabilities in it I would use this idea of a trio buddy system to help there be more of a positive social dynamic in the class between the students with disabilities and regular students. 

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What's Global about the Common Core Standards?

What's Global about the Common Core Standards? | Education | Scoop.it
See how the skill development and acquisition of core content needed to develop globally competent citizens comes together with the rigorous skills and core content needed for college and careers.
Michaela Vila's insight:

After reading this I was surprised by how closely related Common Core is with global competence. I wish that CCSS made global competence and awareness more explicit, but this article points out how Common Core allows teachers to have many opportunities to use global competence and awareness as a tool to incorporate these standards. As I have been finding readings for content curation, I found a lot of people stating that CCSS allows for global competence but I didn't understand how till now. Common Core's standards require students to perform skills that are needed in each of the four domains of global competence but there is no direct mention of global competence, so I am really left wondering why isn't this more explicit when there is so much connection! 

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A Global View: The Adventure of Kid-Friendly Foreign Films

A Global View: The Adventure of Kid-Friendly Foreign Films | Education | Scoop.it
For many of us, Oscar week can serve as the annual reminder of how many great grown-up films we have yet to see, and how many kids' movies we've already seen -- over and over and over. Next time you
Michaela Vila's insight:

I think this is a really great way for teachers to make the best use of the "down time" or extra indoor time in their classrooms. Showing children foreign films lets children analysis culture in a way that is easily understandable for them. I would like to use this in my own future class time because children always get excited over movies but I am left wondering, after the movie how can I get them to want to investigate the new part of the world that is being discovering on their own and get them to take action beyond what we do in the classroom. I think this would be a good outlet to inspire global competency at home because maybe if students are introduced topics at school they can go home to do the investigations on their own. 

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A Global School for a Global Age

A Global School for a Global Age | Education | Scoop.it

At the Vaughn Next Century Learning Center in Pacoima, a low-income area of Los Angeles, California, we began thinking seriously about all of these issues six years ago. Since then, we have globalized the curriculum for the K-12 students at our five schools. The result is that the 2,700 students from our low-income, mostly Hispanic community have recently become some of the nation's most globally-savvy young people.


Via iEARN-USA
Michaela Vila's insight:

We are in a Global Age! This article does a really great job of highlighting why we need to make children globally competent. What I need to do in my classroom is not just raise global awareness, but I need to stress why all countries are so interrelated and then inspire students to take action. In my future class I will use this term a Global Age to help stress the need for global awareness and competence.

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The Convergence of Math, Science, and ELA Practices | Stanford

The Convergence of Math, Science, and ELA Practices | Stanford


Via Mel Riddile
Michaela Vila's insight:

In class we talk a lot about how PBL calls for many subject areas to come together. This is a very useful chart that I should be using in my future classrooms when creating a PBL project that facilitate CCSS. This chart is limiting but I think this is a great example of what I should be doing in the future to best combine PBL and CCSS. 

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Common Core State Standards

Common Core State Standards | Education | Scoop.it
Actively engage students with our ELA (English Language Arts) and Math Common Core State Standards (CCSS) kits! Each kit includes a “best-in-class” assortment of CCSS-aligned tools to cover all the domains for kindergarten through grade 4.

Via etiEdge
Michaela Vila's insight:

Wow this is something new to me. The company Learning Resources created kits for teachers and parents that have games and workbooks to support the CCSS. The company identifies what items go with what CCSS and has example activities. Great resource if you are unsure how to make a CCSS fun. 

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10 Tips for Raising a Global Child - Huffington Post

10 Tips for Raising a Global Child - Huffington Post | Education | Scoop.it
10 Tips for Raising a Global Child Huffington Post As our children become adults, going off to college or into the workforce, we must help them apply these skills so they can become the global workers that organizations demand whether they're in...

Via Lauren Lakey
Michaela Vila's insight:

This connects what we have been talking about in class but goes deeper and focuses about the home. A key take away is that children must feel confident in their home in order to help understand other cultures and to feel comfortable in different places around the world. Teachers should understand the importance of home when trying to teach global competency because the home acts as an explore base. 

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Lauren Lakey's curator insight, February 13, 2014 11:20 PM

This article is really helpful, not just for parents but for teachers as well.  This article provides great tips for raising and educating globally competent children for the future.  I personally hope to employ some of these practices in my future classroom as a teacher because I believe that in today's technology driven world, people need to be globally competent.

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Yoga to Elementary Schools

Yoga to Elementary Schools | Education | Scoop.it
Yoga article: Yoga teachers, parents, and educators team up to bring yoga to elementary schoolchildren.
Michaela Vila's insight:

For another unique activity that I would like to have in the classroom is yoga. With the decrease in physical education, despite younger students need to move around and have physical activity, I thought that yoga was an important activity to put in the classroom. It gets students to do (and be encouraged to do) physical activity which is important for students in elementary education because it is getting students to have a healthier life style through exercise and yoga can do a lot for mental health by learning how to relax and mediate (whole child development). A teacher could chose to use yoga to help build global competence because yoga originated in a foreign country and has a lot of language and references based off of another culture. I thought that this was a really fun and potentially a really culturally fun activity to put into the classroom. The link suggests doing yoga once every other week but I think I would want to do it at least once every week to reinforce the importance to physical activity. For each yoga lesson I would want to do a warm up, introduce or continue working on two poses and then finish with a game and/or an activity talking about its cultural relevance. 

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Peer Mediation

Michaela Vila's insight:

With PBL being in the classroom and calling for so much collaboration and communication, I thought that peer mediation was an important unique routine to put into the classroom. Peer mediation allows students to work on the conflict resolution skills and thinking about someone else's perspective (a skill needed for global competency). I thought that was partially useful for PBL because with PBL the teacher is going to be having to do a lot of overseeing projects, making sure students are on the right path, and making interjections and comments about what students should be doing next. Students should take it upon themselves to try and solve the conflict first before they ask for the assistance of the teacher. This link was rather specific and seemed to be for more serious conflict but I would like to adapt a more general approach to peer mediation to serve for both minor and more serious conflicts. 

 

Steps for my peer mediation. 

 

1) Identify there is a problem between two parties and agree for the need of mediation. 

2) Call on mediator.

3) Both sides tell the mediator what happened. Mediator asks if there is anything that either party would like to add. 

4) Mediator asses the situation and proposes a few alternatives. 

5) If no settlement can be made then they can tell the teacher that there is a problem. 

6) If the teacher feels the need to address the conflict in that moment they can, otherwise then they can ask all three groups to fill out a mediation sheet (shown in the link) about what has been done for the mediation so far and sign an agreement to "keep cool" until a solution has been agreed to. 

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Pin by Michaela Vila on Miss. Vila - Education | Pinterest

Pin by Michaela Vila on Miss. Vila - Education | Pinterest | Education | Scoop.it
Classroom Rules - RESPECT Change the C to Clean Up! Great for Art room
Michaela Vila's insight:

I feel like this is how teachers displayed rules a lot in the classrooms that I had growing up, but I think it is an even better way to display dispositions in the classroom because you can have the one disposition up at the top like "respect" and then spell out the disposition vertically and have rules that are examples of the disposition (I think rules are necessary even when you have a focus on dispositions just because the classroom calls for many specific expectations and having rules with dispositions makes it clear what the overall expectation is). In this example for respect, the R which stands for "respect yourself and others" is an example of what respect is in the classroom. This tactic allows children to have a reminder of what they are striding to perform and learn (e.g. respect) and specific rules of what they need to do to allow for this performance and learning. This allows adults to actively support how children are learning the depositions and students can feel this support with the abundance of visuals of what the expectations are in the classroom (whole child development). 

 

When I was looking for ways to display rules, I think that this kind of chart was one of the most common ways that I saw teachers displaying rules and I liked it because one thing that I found interesting about my findings was how specific some teachers got. If you look at link one below, you can see an example of a teacher that did one of these charts that was rules just for group work. So instead of writing a disposition vertically you would write the topic that rules apply to (e.g. groups). I like this idea because it highlights the specific expectations for particular situations. Other examples that I saw were charts for when a sub was there or rules for a learning center. I think it is important to have a lot of these expectations written around the room because it acts as a constant reminder for students and is a good point of reference when addressing a conflict in the classroom. 

 

Because I think it is important to build student's autonomy so they can feel safe and engaged in the classroom, I really liked this idea of a class creating a venn diagram of the expectations of the teacher and the expectations of the students with hula hoops, link two; to make this an autonomy building activity I would make sure that the students are generating the expectations of the teacher themselves. It is my belief that in order to create a positive learning environment students must feel that teachers need to follow the rules too so they don't have the attitude that the teacher is only telling them what to do because students are not going to want to respond well to that. If students see that teachers also have expectations to uphold, then they will be more understanding that they are both working together to create this learning environment. From this I liked the idea of it's visual representation, as well as the idea that teachers need to have explicit expectations that students know they are being upheld to. 

 

1) http://www.pinterest.com/pin/405535141418318134/ ;

2) http://www.pinterest.com/pin/268386459013211514/

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Why Children's Dispositions Should Matter to All Teachers By DaRos-Voseles.pdf

Michaela Vila's insight:

After our discussion in class, I think that it is important to establish and create a focus on dispositions in the classroom (even when working with the younger elementary students). This article extends on our class discussion by saying if teachers were to teach specific rules and skills (i.e. wait to talk when someone else is talking) important dispositions (i.e. respect) become ignored. The article claims that learning dispositions is what facilitates the motivation to be a life-long learner. This claim shows why dispositions are so important to our mission, creating a life-long learner allows students to be continually expanding their knowledge of the rapidly changing world and thus allowing them to sustain and/or find a place for themselves in the world. Also being a life-long learner supports people being resilient because it creates the persistence of learner and it makes them take initiative and responsibility for their own learning. From this life-long learning, students can also gain important skills of resilience such as problem solving, creativity, and decision making. Also life-long learning can arguably help establish global competence because it can create the desire to investigate the world, recognize perspectives, communicate ideas, and take action as they are aware of the world being in constant change. 

 

This article highlights four of the dispositions that I would like to establish in my classroom, independence, creativity, self-motivation, and resilience, but I would also like to add respect and responsibility in my classroom. These specific dispositions helps assures whole development of children because students learn how to be and feel safe through practicing respect and responsibility, they learn to be engaged though practicing creativity, self-motivation, and resilience and they learn to be challenge themselves through practicing self-motivation and resilience. 


Finally creating these dispositions in the classroom will help support PBL because these dispositions are important to put into place in order for PBL to work smoothly by having the class most effectively collaborate, create, communicate, discover, and publish content together. For example, teaching the dispositions of respect and responsibility will teach children to work more constructively with each other because the will be polite and understanding of the people they are working with. Another example is resilience, PBL calls for a lot of resilience because most PBL projects don't give students explicit instructions and forces children create the type of finished products that they chose to design; students will need resilience to get through the problem solving, organizing, reasoning, communication and decision making that is needed for creating a final product in PBL. 

 

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Don’t Listen to Music While Studying

Don’t Listen to Music While Studying | Education | Scoop.it
I notice several students listening to music while busy at work. I have no good reason to ask that they remove their headphones and turn off their devices. As I walk around the room, I admire the ele
Michaela Vila's insight:

What a controversy that seems to be created over whether listening to music helps study or hinders it (Read comments to this article as well)! I really did not like this article because it was too one sided and it about older students, but I found it on my tweetdeck and I think the idea of music in the classroom is very interesting. The one argument in this article had that is important to keep in mind is that listening to music can decrease memory capacity on other tasks done at the same time; I would have to agree with this on a minor note. In the comments in the article and from my own experience it is also said that music helps to distress the studying process and allows people to keep working when they don't want to, so I wanted find an article that talks about music being a good thing in the classroom. This was a surprising difficult task. I did find this article linked below that says it can be a good way for students to block out other students and it keeps them focused; I would also agree with this and go one further to say that it probably keeps more students quite because they are listening rather than talking.The article focuses on allowing students to use their iPods in a classroom and also mentions that it is a good reward system. Even though I really did not like this first attached article, I am so glad it left me thinking about how to approach using music in the classroom because I think it is a great idea. http://www.centerdigitaled.com/classtech/Music-in-the-Classroom-Distraction-or-Study-Tool.html

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The Power of the Morning Meeting: 5 Steps Toward Changing Your Classroom and School Culture

The Power of the Morning Meeting: 5 Steps Toward Changing Your Classroom and School Culture | Education | Scoop.it
"The whole morning meeting not only sets a really good tone for the students, but it sets a tone for me." - Teacher in Louisville, Kentucky

When I first learned about the Morning Meeting model, I wa
Michaela Vila's insight:

Before this article I viewed a morning meeting as a tool for organizing the classroom, to establish a plan, make any clarifications and to start things off on a positive note, but after reading this article I was surprised on how much is can help create a positive classroom climate. I think that this gives students a chance to work out issues at the begin of the day on their own in a constructive environment, maybe before they rise into a bigger conflict later in the day. I use morning meetings at the camp I work at, but again it has been only for organization and a pick-me-up starter activity. From now on I want to use this time to focus on any issues in the classroom to give students a chance to work out their own issues in the morning before they arise into a bigger conflict. 

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Beyond Zero Tolerance: Achieving a Balance in School Discipline

Beyond Zero Tolerance: Achieving a Balance in School Discipline | Education | Scoop.it
Disruptive behavior continues to be one of the most challenging issues that schools face today. Even one seriously incompliant student can threaten teaching and learning for the rest of the class. An
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This is an amazing persuasive article that left me thinking we should never expel or suspend students. After this read, I gained insight on the shocking racial discrepancies between the expulsion and suspensions of African American students and white students. At first African American students doubled white students in expulsions and suspensions, but now it more like three and a half times. The zero tolerance is not working, but creating a positive classroom climate does help (in some cases by over 50%). At the end of this article is nine helpful alternative approaches. I was really interested in number nine, by having peer mediation to resolve classroom conflicts. I want to look more into peer mediation because I think it potentially something I want to use in my classroom. 

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Tips for Teaching Grade School Students How to Make Global Impact

Tips for Teaching Grade School Students How to Make Global Impact | Education | Scoop.it
How you can encourage global perspectives in your students: Teachers from John Stanford International School in Seattle share a few favorite strategies.
Michaela Vila's insight:

This video gives me insight on how to give meaning to raising global competency and awareness, by asking students to reflect on why it is important to examine cultures outside of their own. In my future classroom I would like to foliow this teacher's practice of not always telling the students why they are investigating an essential question, but asking them to reflect and share why they think this investigation is important. Also there is a really interesting "festival of lights" project to help examine religions in this video that I would like to learn more about. I liked that the teacher used this project to focus on global competence and told them to take action by creating presentations. This gave me insight that "taking action" doesn't always have to be big and elaborate, just as long as the child are engaged and teaching others. I liked this video in particular because think that learning religion is a lot an important part of global competence and awareness when often teachers find it a touchy subject and refrain from teaching it.  

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How do Students Interact with Teachers in Online IBDP courses? - YouTube

Have you ever wondered how a student could interact with a classmate who lives on the other side of the world? This video explains just some of the ways in w...
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This is a very literal sense of global competence in a classroom because student's peers and teachers can all be from different countries. In this video one of the students highlights how culturally rich her classroom becomes since her classes are online with people in other countries. I feel like the chances of me working in an environment like this is slim, but this video helps me understand that it maybe more of a possibility than I think. One would think after watching these videos that these types of classrooms are effective and might gain popularity, College Park Academy has a model that is very similar to this, so future teachers like me should become familiarized with these kinds of schools. Though some of us like myself might find this classroom a little too futuristic, but lets think the opportunities to build globally competent/aware classrooms is endless. Maybe this is a good thing for our future! 

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A Bit of Research

Educational Leadership: Teaching Students to Think.

 

1) Role of facilatator

2) Typical projects include . . .

3) Challenges of implementation

 

Findings suggest "caution in embracing this practice . . ."


Via William Eaton
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Wow so many little weird things about this article! It says that charter schools are focus on PBL more than traditional public schools and that elementary school grades are more likely to combined subject areas for PBL projects. I wish this article talked more about how we should challenge this! Not to mention I hate this last line "Together these findings suggest caution in embracing this practice unless the conditions for success are in place." I think we need more of a practice makes perfect attitude here! 

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Where in the World Will You Go Next with PBL?

Where in the World Will You Go Next with PBL? | Education | Scoop.it
Previously in this series on going deeper with project-based learning, we've explored the importance of teacher reflection in teacher reflection in PBL, considered how to plan interdisciplinary proje...

Via JackieGerstein Ed.D.
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This article addresses how to bring together global competency and PBL. It contains links to on going projects that teachers can get their classes involved in. It make take some time, but pulling all of this together will help create meaningful experiences for children. 

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Resources and Downloads for Global Competence

Resources and Downloads for Global Competence | Education | Scoop.it
Educators from the John Stanford International School, in Seattle, Washington, have provided these resources and tools for teaching global competence.
Michaela Vila's insight:

These are some great example units starting at 3rd grade. These units allow students to learn tolerance of other cultures and religion, compare and contrast cultures, and create arguments. This dealt more with the investigating part of global competency but there was also this attacked article about an example school taking action. http://www.edutopia.org/stw-global-competence-k-5 ;

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