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40 Maps That Explain The Middle East

40 Maps That Explain The Middle East | GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
These maps are crucial for understanding the region's history, its present, and some of the most important stories there today.

Via Seth Dixon
Linda Denty's insight:

As Seth Dixson says, maps only tell a part of a story, but this may assist as part of an overall understanding of the history of the area.

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Lora Tortolani's curator insight, March 15, 2015 8:47 PM

It is interesting to see the same trends over and over again.  These maps are a great tool to show the history of the area, as well as the history of religion and political views.  I appreciate the information provided since the Middle East has undergone the most transitions (going all the way back to Mesopotamia) and its history can be confusing. 

Alex Vielman's curator insight, November 23, 2015 3:17 PM

Maps like the ones posted in this article, really helps people to understand and break down deeply of understanding the entire region as a whole. Visualization is very important in geography when trying to understand the region people are talking about. this region as goes down to the Mesopotamia Era. It is important to know, how the culture was in this area to how it differentiated during the Ottoman Empire. During the first couple of maps, we can begin to see the division of the entire region. As you go on, we begin to notice the divisions between people, religion, language between states and in-states. There is so much information to know about the Middle East region and it may be even harder to understand due to the tons of changes and separations, but it is important to understand these divisions like the Sunni's and the Shi'ites in order to fully explain the development and the current situations that are occurring in this region as we speak. 

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 7, 2015 5:18 PM

These 40 maps are a very interesting way of showing how people have traveled around and moved about the Earth from the time of the fertile crescent era to the people of today. It shows us the paths that people have taken to move to a new location. How they used the Meditteranean Sea to move from one side to the other. It also shows how the Tigris and Euphrates came together to form a smaller area of the Persian gulf. This led to smalled economic growth because now there is less land for imports and exports.

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Putin: Turkey's downing of jet a 'stab in the back'

Putin: Turkey's downing of jet a 'stab in the back' | GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Russian warplane crashes in Latakia province in Syria and two pilots seen ejecting from the aircraft.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 24, 2015 9:24 AM

A border is not a line in the sand but a vertical plane, defining airspace as well as underground assets. The protection of borders and airspace is something that sovereign states take very seriously and can lead to some tense situations.  


Tags: borders, political, conflict, geopolitics.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 4:48 PM

it is truly insane that turkey would shoot down a Russian jet engaging anyone in Syria, especially when the Turks are shooting at the Kurds, who are fighting the people that the Turks claim to hate. this is especially troubling, as Turkey is a part of NATO and may drag the rest of the NATO nations into any war they start.

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China's one-child policy and the lessons for America

China's one-child policy and the lessons for America | GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Let's review exactly what population has to do with economic growth

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Chris Costa's curator insight, November 25, 2015 3:00 PM

I found this article absolutely fascinating. In the 2016 presidential race, Democratic candidate (and, arguably, frontrunner) Bernie Sanders has pledged to raise corporate taxes in order to provide for social programs, better education, and universal healthcare for all its citizens. Critics have pointed to the failure of such a plan when he attempted to implement it in his home state of Vermont, where the working class was simply not large enough to support the retirement system Sanders attempted to put in place. Defenders of Bernie have argued that what's true of Vermont's demographic- the second least populated state in the country- will not hold true for the nation as a whole, and this article suggests that these defenders have a point. While economic growth may not be as fast for younger American workers, by 2040 these welfare programs will still be running under any additional strain. The same cannot be said for the Chinese, where the disproportionate number of males being born- 119 for every 100 female children- means that a huge population gap will emerge between younger and older Chinese. Without being able to father a new generation, this group of mostly-male Chinese will age and be an enormous burden on the Chinese economy, to an extent that's almost unfathomable here in the US. China has since revered its One Child Policy that put itself in its current predicament, but it may well be a case of too little, too late.

Sarah Nobles's curator insight, November 27, 2015 7:57 AM

Unit 2

Claudia Patricia Parra's curator insight, December 3, 2015 8:03 AM

añada su visión ...

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The World’s Driest Desert Is in Breathtaking Bloom

The World’s Driest Desert Is in Breathtaking Bloom | GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"After historic rains, Atacama, Chile is exploding with vibrant wildflowers.  Here's a softer side to the disruptive weather phenomenon known as El Nino: an enormous blanket of colorful flowers has carpeted Chile's Atacama desert, the most arid in the world. The cyclical warming of the central Pacific may be causing droughts and floods in various parts of the world, but in the vast desert of northern Chile it has also caused a vibrant explosion of thousands of species of flowers with an intensity not seen in decades."


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Pierre Ratcliffe's comment, October 31, 2015 2:56 AM
How life forms have been dormant for decades or centuries or more. The DNA of these plants were there ready when conditions were favourable.
Leonardo Wild's curator insight, October 31, 2015 9:44 AM

Amazing Nature!

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, November 2, 2015 12:32 PM

Wow! This is such an amazing thing to see happened in the driest place on Earth. The disruptive weather phenomenon, El Nino really made this place come to life by bringing rainfall and floods. A spectacular site to see, that in the most harshest physical environment, life can flourished.

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Every Job in America, Mapped

Every Job in America, Mapped | GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Are you one of the millions of Americans opting into "job sprawl" over a short commute?

 

Before you dig in to “Where are the Jobs?: Employment in America 2010,” it may help to note that each dot represents a single job—and you can tell what kind of job it is because of its color. Manufacturing and trade jobs are red; professional services jobs are blue; healthcare, education, and government jobs are green; and retail, hospitality, and other service jobs are yellow. You won’t find any dots for federal jobs (no available data), and Massachusetts is missing entirely—the only state to opt out of reporting its employment trends. The end result is a highly detailed map that gives viewers a quick summary of how many and what types of jobs are a part of the economy.


Tags: economic, labor, USA, transportation, industry.


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How Modern Cartographers Marry Math and Art

How Modern Cartographers Marry Math and Art | GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"Old maps get a lot of love, and with good reason—with their sea monsters and sheer craftsmanship, they can transport us through both space and time. But although they lack fold-mark furrows, there’s something to be said for new maps, too. Leafing through Mind the Map, a stunning new book from Gestalten, it’s hard not to think we’re living in the middle of a map renaissance, a time when cartographers and illustrators have good design on their minds and satellite data at their fingertips. This partnership between math and art allows for representations that are not only technically accurate, but also have a sense of a place."


Tags: mapping, visualization, cartography, unit 1 Geoprinciples.


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New Message's curator insight, October 31, 2015 6:08 PM

The vulnerability of coastal areas so evident! #SeaLevelRise

Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, November 4, 2015 5:36 AM

Map: art and math

www.cheapassignmenthelp.com's curator insight, November 6, 2015 5:38 AM

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The Growing Need for Geographic Education

The Growing Need for Geographic Education | GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"The National Council for Geographic Education (NCGE) continues to both promote and celebrate geographic teaching and learning. Our activities include conducting and gathering research, producing journals and other geography publications, developing curricular resources at the K-12 and University levels, providing professional development opportunities, and organizing an annual conference."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 9, 2015 12:52 PM

The NCGE promotes geographic education, which we need now more than ever--here are the labor statistics about the future need for geographers supporting the statements in the image above. 


Tags: NCGE, geography education, labor.

Elisa's curator insight, November 12, 2015 2:00 PM

www .ncge .org

Kaye Morley's curator insight, November 16, 2015 6:31 PM

Great fact to remember for the next subject selection day!

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Awakening the World to the Power of Geography

Awakening the World to the Power of Geography | GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"GIS is waking up the world to the power of geography, this science of integration, and…creating a better future," proclaimed Esri founder Jack Dangermond at the 2015 Esri User Conference.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 13, 2015 4:29 PM

If you haven't discovered the power of geography or the power of GIS, this article from ArcNews is for you.  If you need to convince others of the power of geography, this is for you to strengthen your case.  


Tags: GIS, ESRI, mapping, cartography, geospatial, edtech, geography education, unit 1 GeoPrinciples.

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Why Somaliland is not a recognized state

Why Somaliland is not a recognized state | GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"SOMALILAND, a slim slice of Somali-inhabited territory on the southern shore of the Gulf of Aden, ticks almost all the boxes of statehood. It has its own currency, a reasonably effective bureaucracy and a trained army and police force. But it has yet to receive official recognition from a single foreign government in the years since it declared independence in 1991. To the outside world, it is an autonomous region of Somalia, subject to the Somali Federal Government (SFG) in Mogadishu. Why is it not a state?  Throughout the post-independence era, geopolitics in Africa has tended to respect 'colonial borders', i.e. the borders laid down by European colonial powers in the 19th century. Across the continent, there have been only two significant alterations to the colonial map since the 1960s: the division of Eritrea from Ethiopia, in 1993; and South Sudan from Sudan, in 2011."


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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 19, 2015 1:35 PM

unit 4

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 19, 2015 1:35 PM

unit 4

Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:55 PM

Like many new developing countries, it is hard to overcome the hardships to prove that you deserve to be recognized as a new nation. Being recognized as a true nation means that there is political and economic stability within a country. The area where Somaliland is located is very unstable. Its parent nation, Somalia is very unstable. For example, in Somalia, there are pirates who hijack mariners and take them and the vessel hostage. Stability within a country is a major aspect for the international community to look at to recognize new countries.

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The Myth of the Caliphate

The Myth of the Caliphate | GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

Myth Article #1: Western pundits and nostalgic Muslim thinkers alike have built up a narrative of the caliphate as an enduring institution, central to Islam and Islamic thought between the seventh and twentieth centuries. In fact, the caliphate is a political or religious idea whose relevance has waxed and waned according to circumstances.

 

Myth Article #2: ISIS may use terrorism as a tactic, but it is not a terrorist organization. Rather, it is a pseudo-state led by a conventional army. So the counterterrorism strategies that were useful against al Qaeda won’t work in the fight against ISIS.


Myth Video #1: This video points to the reasons that recruits are attracted to extremism (not just poverty and ignorance).

 

Tags: political, governance, religion, Islam, historical, terrorism, geopolitics, ISIS.


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Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, November 26, 2015 5:12 AM

Myth

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, November 30, 2015 2:32 PM

The idea of the Caliphate seems to be more of what all the groups which called themselves Caliphates seem to be pursuing. It seems to me that the fact of the matter is less important than the idea, as what happened one hundred years ago is far less important than what is believed to have happened. That ISIS is a state can be argued, but the fact that they are fighting a conventional war is indisputable. Yes, the tactics we use must be shifted, but this means that support from aircraft or by indirect means are even more viable than they were during the Second Gulf War.

 

 

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Paris Bloodshed May Be the Latest of Many ISIS Attacks Around the World

Paris Bloodshed May Be the Latest of Many ISIS Attacks Around the World | GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
At least a dozen countries have had attacks since the Islamic State, or ISIS, began to pursue a global strategy in the summer of 2014.

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Chelsea Martines's curator insight, November 21, 2015 3:41 PM
The Paris attacks from ISIS are now being discovered as linked to other attacks that ISIS has planned out. They have up until now according to the article, done 'lone wolf' attacks and now are changing to bigger and city kind of attacks across the globe. They are taking over much of the Middle East and Africa, in hopes to make that area chaotic enough to start more global conflict and another world war, accoring to the article. There have been studies and research in tracking ISIS and they have found that attacks in many other cities in the world have been inspired by ISIS as well.
Matthew Richmond's curator insight, December 2, 2015 12:23 PM

These maps were very helpful in understanding the spread and threat of ISIS. It also helps the understanding of just what a wide range of places they have attacked is. They are capable of striking much of the world in the name of fundamentalism. However, the video of Muslim's chanting is one of those things that can kind of turn down the fear, especially of admitting refugees, that has gripped much of the world. We are as safe as we can be, but idea's are bulletproof and there's no end in sight to the elimination of Islamic Fundamentalism.

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, December 4, 2015 10:55 AM

Read this article and fill out your Socratic seminar question sheet for the inner/outer circle on Tues, Dec 8

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Biodiversity doesn't lower disease risk for people - Futurity

Biodiversity doesn't lower disease risk for people - Futurity | GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
STANFORD (US) — A new analysis pokes holes in a widely accepted theory that connects biodiversity abundance with a reduced … Continued
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Childhood malnutrition has long reach - Futurity

Childhood malnutrition has long reach - Futurity | GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
MICHIGAN STATE (US)—Malnutrition early in life appears to diminish brain function in older adults, according to a new study that … Continued
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The Surreal Reasons Girls Are Disappearing In El Salvador

The Surreal Reasons Girls Are Disappearing In El Salvador | GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Refuse to share a pencil, reject a boy, say no to your imprisoned dad — all of these can get a teen girl killed in El Salvador's gang war.

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Patty B's curator insight, October 18, 2015 9:59 AM

Where poor economic conditions are present, crime is usually following close behind. People need money to eat, to survive. People who live in crime and gang infested areas must live their lives in a constant state of fear. Really, this article can be boiled down to economics. The conditions in El Salvador are vastly different than in the U.S. because there is more money in the U.S. As we have learned, economic disparities manifest themselves within cities, throughout regions, and across countries and the globe. Some have it better than others for a myriad of reasons. When facing serious economic challenges on a daily basis, one can't necessarily blame those who turn to crime as a last resort. I believe that if the economic gap throughout the entire world was shrunk just a bit, that crime would drastically fall (at least violent crimes). If people living in favelas, for example, did not have  to look at a booming metropolis (that they aren't a part of) right in their backyards, maybe those residing in the slums wouldn't feel the need to commit crimes, maybe they'd be more confident in who they are and what they are doing with their lives. Maybe the comforts of the 21st century need to be distributed just a bit more evenly in order to deter people from committing crimes. Maybe it would give those who turn to crime something legitimate to lose if they get caught by law enforcement. There wouldn't be a need for the creation of makeshift governments that we refer to as 'gangs.' These gangs do for its members what the government fails to. 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 20, 2015 3:40 PM

unit 3

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, October 21, 2015 10:38 AM

This article was very stunning and graphical to read. The rate of murder and homicide is so abnormal that it makes one question who doesn't want to leave there. I can definitely see why girls are the main targets because they are stuck in between these so called gangs because a person they know is usually affiliated with one. Their hardship of escaping was very touching and getting to experience and seeing a first hand perspective of these young girls really opened my eyes. We should not see people seeking asylum in other countries as a bad thing ,but rather sympathize for their well being that they have escaped the horrible life they had back home.

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Diwali: Festival of Lights

Diwali: Festival of Lights | GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
In India, one of the most significant festivals is Diwali, or the Festival of Lights. It's a five-day celebration that includes good food, fireworks, colored sand, and special candles and lamps.

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Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:46 AM

this is an amazing example of another culture reflecting a constant theme. every culture has some form of this celebration, but this is a truly wondrous display that everyone should at least know about, if not be inspired by.

Alex Vielman's curator insight, December 15, 2015 12:40 AM

In India, one of the most significant festivals in the region is in Diwali, known as the Festival of Lights. The festival symbolizes the forces of lights over the force of darkness. In other words, it symbolizes the good of the country over the evil. This is a festival around the Christmas time which allows families and friends to join together in order to represent the good. The day is followed by rituals, going to the temple, food, etc. and of course the lights. It is truly fascinating how thousands of people reunite in order to make this festival happen over and over each year. It is a day for sure that describes peace against the problems occurring in the country and it is a ray of hope for others. Some critics, are concerned about the thousands of fireworks that are lit up because they say it causes too much pollution but it is  day to rejoice and forget the bad to others.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 3:35 PM

this is a great example of cultural diffusion. you can see events like this all over the U.S including here in providence with the waterfires, very cool.

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The Trans-Pacific Partnership Explained

"Stratfor Vice President of East Asia Analysis Rodger Baker talks about the economic and political aspects of the Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement." http://arcg.is/1IeK3dT ;


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Marc Meynardi's comment, November 3, 2015 12:37 PM
Thank you for your comments, which insist on the mean that the TPP is not just a way to free business. The treaty negotiated with EU, just arrive when EU politician are very critisized. Population is on a way back to conservatism and populism. Such treaty does'nt appear to be a good solution and for sure, does'nt come at the right time.
Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, November 4, 2015 5:35 AM

TPP

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:02 AM

This is a very politically contentious partnership and would reshape economic geographies and even regions of the world.  From the 1500's to the 1980's, the Atlantic trade had the greatest volume of world trade, but the Pacific has surged past, and is showing no signs of being supplanted any time soon.  This Stratfor video is a quick introduction to the economics and politics of the TPP. 


Tags: industry, development, economic.

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Daylight Saving Time Explained


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 1, 2015 7:00 PM

If you haven't discovered CGP Grey yet, his YouTube channel is a veritable fountain of geographic tidbits.  Day Light Savings (whether you agree with it or not) has to do with fundamental Earth-Sun relationships and have some corresponding spatial patterns of who does or does not follow it.  The tag below links to my archive of his many geographically related videos.   


Tags: CGP Grey.

Charli Wiggill's curator insight, November 2, 2015 6:45 AM

@Jackie Barnard - any use for your geographers?

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China to end one-child policy

China to end one-child policy | GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"All couples will now be allowed to have two children, the state-run news agency said, citing a statement from the Communist Party. The controversial policy was introduced nationally in 1979, to reduce the country's birth rate and slow the population growth rate. However, concerns at China's aging population led to pressure for change."


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Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 1, 2015 7:37 PM

Lets not forget the expansion of china also with its economic strength and its military strength which is a threat to other countries in the area because china can take control and with Chinese moving into Africa and United states as residents china is going to need to populate its own country.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 8:55 PM

First implemented in 1979 and diminished in 2013 It is good to hear something like this has finally come to an end. Although it deemed successful by stopping the birth of an estimated 400 million babies, there were some places that allowed two children in rural areas if the first was a girl. It is assumed though that even though this is no longer a required policy, many couples may only have one child since it is accepted as a social norm. 

Patty B's curator insight, April 29, 12:31 PM
This was, of course, massive news coming out of China. It is something that needed to be done, at least from the Chinese's standpoint. But this is also an important issue to the entire world. First and foremost, this article ties into the fact that the world's population reached 7 billion within the past couple of years and is continuing to rise. It ties into the fact that the human population is quickly approaching its maximum capacity. While China's new policy may or may not speed up the world population by any amount that will truly matter, any news related to global population at this point in time is a hot topic. But this policy was implemented to reverse some serious issues that have arisen in China as a result of its one-child policy. It's population is made up with a majority of retirement aged folk. China needs to ensure it has enough qualified working-aged people in the future and believe a two-child limit will aid in this happening. So of course China had many economic reasons for ending its one-child policy, but there are also certain social reasons for doing so I think. In a world where many human rights and civil rights issues have found their ways to the forefront of political and social discussions, China must have felt obligated to do something about the one-child policy to keep up with the wave of political correctness sweeping the globe. A one-child policy seemed extremely restrictive in a world that is becoming increasingly more apt to let people make decisions for themselves. 
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Are you ignorant about the world?

Are you ignorant about the world? | GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
The world is spinning so fast that it can be hard to keep track of everything going on. And most of us aren't doing a good job of it, writes Hans Rosling.

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 7, 2015 9:47 AM

perception of place units 1 &3

John Puchein's curator insight, November 9, 2015 8:42 AM

Hans Rosling is a very important influence on Geography. He created Gapminder and continuously makes great Ted Talks.

Sarah Cannon's curator insight, November 25, 2015 9:18 AM

I believe that there are many people in the U.S. who do not pay attention to the news. Some are too poor to own a phone or television to keep up with what is going on in the world (although they can read the news paper, but you get my point). Others are too rich to care. And some base there opinions off of other peoples views and don't have an opinion of their own. Am I ignorant about the world? No, because I like to know what's happening world wide, especially if there are issues going on that can affect the survival of the human race, survival of the environment, and survival of my country.

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The Ganges River Is Dying Under the Weight of Modern India

The Ganges River Is Dying Under the Weight of Modern India | GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
The country’s future depends on keeping the holy river alive.

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Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 7:00 PM

The Ganges River is a place of religion for these people, they see it as a place where they can bathe for the forgiveness of sins and for ancestors alike. The only problem with this really is that it is a very dirty river, sewage and other sorts of waste, germs and disease are running through it. Unfortunately, the people are drinking from this river.  

Alex Vielman's curator insight, December 15, 2015 12:21 AM

The Ganges River is the most populated region in all of India. The river is sacred and is very holy to the people of India. The river is a religious river in which the people residing in the area use it as a symbolization or purification, life, bathing and drinking. The bigger issue for 'purification' is the fact that the river is very polluted and unsanitary. The pollution not only threatens the people because it could be used for drinking but it also affects the thousands of species, for example fish, that are in the river. The fish could be a source of food for the very overpopulated area but instead the very own people of India are damaging the river. One would think that a river so sacred would be protected and cleaned but it fails to meet these standards. Overall, regardless of the pollution, India still uses it for its religious beliefs and still declare it a holy river. 

Sarah Holloway's curator insight, February 16, 6:26 PM

This article touches on very serious religious and environmental issues connected to the Ganges River.  The Ganges is the sacred river of Hinduism and in part because the river valley is the most heavily populated region of India.  Simultaneously, this holy river is an incredibly polluted river as it's the watershed for a industrial region that struggles with significant sanitation problems; this is a great article on the environmental and cultural issues of development.

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Half of Canada’s population

Half of Canada’s population | GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"Half of Canada’s 33.5 million people live in the red part, the other in the yellow. More population divided maps (Source: reddit.com)"


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 2, 2015 3:58 PM

Land-wise, Canada one of the world's biggest countries, but population-wise, most of it is quite barren.  What geographic factors explain the population concentration and distribution in Canada?  


TagsCanada, map, North America.

JeanneSilvey's curator insight, November 17, 2015 10:09 AM

A great illustration of population concentration and high density in Urban centers. 4.6 million of the remaining 17 million (approx.) live in British Columbia.

 

Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 17, 2015 11:41 AM

First economically for trade routes you have the St. Lawrence river which was originally the most influential route for French explorers. You have Toronto the Canada's financial center which forms the core of the "Golden Horseshoe" region, which wraps around the western end of Lake Ontario, population wise a quarter of Canada's population lives here.  Politically it makes sense that government would be set up in that area because of the population in that area.  Which population leads to the social aspect because all activities of night life, restaurants, businesses, entertainment, malls, etc. are located in this area.  And lastly, it makes easy access for United States and Canada to exchange tourism and jobs and goods.

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ISIS: A New Threat

ISIS: A New Threat | GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

In this lesson, students will:

Explore the role of ISIS in the Middle EastInterpret political cartoons on the U.S. response to ISISIdentify the techniques used by cartoonists to express political opinionMonitor the news media coverage of ISIS over time
Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 20, 2015 12:29 PM

The Choices Program produces some great materials and this is from their Teaching with the News series.  The newest in the series is a resource guide for the terrorist attacks in Paris.  


Tags:  political, terrorism, conflict, geopolitics, ISIS, Choices.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, November 27, 2015 4:32 PM

Guerras

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More Mexicans leave than enter USA in historic shift

More Mexicans leave than enter USA in historic shift | GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
After four decades of mass migration to the U.S., more Mexicans are now returning home.

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Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 1, 2015 9:44 PM

With less jobs now in the u.s. and the economic growth in Mexico this is a good reason for Mexicans to head back home. What people do not realize at least I did not is the fact that there is a lot of entrepreneurship on the streets of Mexico. Since 2000 the changes that have occurred in Mexico is economy, education, politics and lower birth rates. 

Matthew Richmond's curator insight, December 2, 2015 12:17 PM

The first thing I thought while I was reading this was "I wonder if Donald Trump, and his flock of moron followers have seen these statistics?" I mean, never let the truth get in the way of a good hate speech right?! But as I continued reading I couldn't help but worry about the effect this could have on the American economy. The truth is that illegal's do the work we aren't willing to do. Do you know any American kids who want to work in the fields of Alabama picking watermelon's for $5 an hour? Hell, do you know any American kids who want to work, period? Do I actually think a watermelon is worth $13?

John Puchein's curator insight, December 4, 2015 6:51 AM

Due to a Mexican economy rebounding and a slow down in the American economy making it harder to find jobs, we are seeing a change in Mexican immigration patterns. While this has been suspected for years, Pew research finalized a study. 

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Tons and tons of plastic are swimming in the ocean - Futurity

Tons and tons of plastic are swimming in the ocean - Futurity | GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
The amount of plastic going from land to ocean each year would "cover an area 34 times the size of Manhattan ankle-deep in plastic waste."
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There's a wrong way to save wetlands - Futurity

There's a wrong way to save wetlands - Futurity | GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
For decades it's been common practice to leave space between new plants when restoring wetlands. It turns out that's likely all wrong.
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Sesame Street's Elmo has a new friend with autism - Futurity

Sesame Street's Elmo has a new friend with autism - Futurity | GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
A new "Sesame Street" initiative, featuring a character named Julia, aims to fight stigma and stereotypes about autism.
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