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What You Need to Know About the Ebola Outbreak

What You Need to Know About the Ebola Outbreak | GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Questions and answers on the scale of the outbreak and the science of the Ebola virus.

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Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, August 18, 3:38 PM

Alerta. Brote de Ebola

Raven Blair's curator insight, August 21, 7:10 AM

I believe that the reason the Ebola outbreak was so bad in West Africa was because of the overpopulation and lack of medical resources. Attempts of containing the virus are being made by asking for the travel history of anyone that comes into the US with a fever. If they had been to West Africa, then they are screened and tested. Alarms have been raised in New York City at 3 hospitals, but no Ebola cases have turned up.

 

~Raven Blair

Robert Simpkins's curator insight, August 21, 7:16 AM

The Ebola virus is a very frightening virus. The fact that there is a chance it could spread to the United States is also scary. Hopefully there will be a cure found for this virus. The side effects of Ebola could be fatal, until there is a cure we should prevent to many trips to areas near West Africa.

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Artful, Aerial Views of Humanity's Impact

Artful, Aerial Views of Humanity's Impact | GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Using aerial photographs that render imperiled landscapes almost abstract, Edward Burtynsky explores the consequences of human activity bearing down on the earth’s resources.

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Diane Johnson's curator insight, August 11, 5:12 AM

These images may be very useful for teaching the DCI's under the Human Impact topic.

Alexandra Piggott's curator insight, August 11, 3:48 PM

Is this evidence of homgeniziation of landscapes?

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 11, 5:11 PM

People change landscapes. This is a great resource available as an iPad App also Called Burtynsky Water. 

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More Chinese on the Coast, Less Fish in the Sea

More Chinese on the Coast, Less Fish in the Sea | GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
China's coastal economic boom is burning out its marine food resources
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Graphic Guides to Ebola from the Epicenter and Abroad

Graphic Guides to Ebola from the Epicenter and Abroad | GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
The Ebola outbreak in Western Africa continues to make the news as more cases are reported and casualties rise. A common thread in reporting is the difficulty in communicating accurate information to...
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40 Maps That Explain The Middle East

40 Maps That Explain The Middle East | GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
These maps are crucial for understanding the region's history, its present, and some of the most important stories there today.

Via Seth Dixon
Linda Denty's insight:

As Seth Dixson says, maps only tell a part of a story, but this may assist as part of an overall understanding of the history of the area.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 31, 7:10 PM

Titles like the one for this article, 40 maps that explain the Middle East, are becoming increasingly common for internet articles.  They helps us feel that we can explain all of the world's complexities and make sense of highly dynamic situations.  While we can all agree that maps are great analytical tools that can be very persuasive, sometimes we can pretend that they are the end all, be all for any situation.  Maps can also be used to show how something that we thought was simple can be much complex and nuanced than we had previously imagined, as demonstrated by this article, 15 Maps that Don't Explain the Middle East at All.  Both perspectives have their place (and both articles are quite insightful). Not connected to the Middle East, but East Asia, this article entitled Lies, Damned Lies and Maps continues the discussion of maps, truth and perception. 

 

Tags: MiddleEast, conflict, political, borders, colonialism, devolution, historical, mapping.

Sharrock's curator insight, August 5, 5:30 AM
Seth Dixon's insight:

Titles like the one for this article, 40 maps that explain the Middle East, are becoming increasingly common for internet articles.  They helps us feel that we can explain all of the world's complexities and make sense of highly dynamic situations.  While we can all agree that maps are great analytical tools that can be very persuasive, sometimes we can pretend that they are the end all, be all for any situation.  Maps can also be used to show how something that we thought was simple can be much complex and nuanced than we had previously imagined, as demonstrated by this article, 15 Maps that Don't Explain the Middle East at All.  Both perspectives have their place (and both articles are quite insightful). Not connected to the Middle East, but East Asia, this article entitled Lies, Damned Lies and Maps continues the discussion of maps, truth and perception.  

 

Tags: MiddleEast, conflict, political, borders, colonialism, devolution,historical, mapping

Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, August 5, 5:10 PM

Some of the histories in maps is helpful in realising the complexities of the issues.

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The world's megacities that are sinking 10 times faster than water levels are rising

The world's megacities that are sinking 10 times faster than water levels are rising | GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Scientists have issued a new warning to the world’s coastal megacities that the threat from subsiding land is a more immediate problem than rising sea levels caused by global warming.

 

A new paper from the Deltares Research Institute in the Netherlands published in April identified regions of the globe where the ground level is falling 10 times faster than water levels are rising - with human activity often to blame.

In Jakarta, Indonesia’s largest city, the population has grown from around half a million in the 1930s to just under 10 million today, with heavily populated areas dropping by as much as six and a half feet as groundwater is pumped up from the Earth to drink.

The same practice led to Tokyo’s ground level falling by two meters before new restrictions were introduced, and in Venice, this sort of extraction has only compounded the effects of natural subsidence caused by long-term geological processes.

 

Tags: coastal, climate change, urban, megacities, water, environment, urban ecology.


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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, August 1, 9:32 PM

Perception!

Matt Evan Dobbie's curator insight, August 2, 3:55 PM

Huge problem when combined with sea level rise

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 3:53 PM

APHG-U7

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The Toll in Gaza and Israel, Day by Day

The Toll in Gaza and Israel, Day by Day | GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
The daily tally of rocket attacks, airstrikes and deaths in the conflict between Israel and Hamas.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 19, 11:26 AM

As the violent nature of the Israeli Palestinian conflict has escalated, this NY Times article monitors the major points of the last few weeks.  The possibility of 'Peace in the Middle East' feels so remote, and this Onion article parodies the difficulties of actually achieving this.  On a personal note, Chad Emmett taught the "Geography of the Middle East" course while I was at BYU and I've always appreciated his perspective; here are his thoughts on recent events.  


Tags: Israel, Palestine, conflict, political, borders.

Utah Geographical Alliance's curator insight, July 28, 12:17 AM
Seth Dixon's insight:

As the violent nature of the Israeli Palestinian conflict has escalated, this NY Times article monitors the major points of the last few weeks.  The possibility of 'Peace in the Middle East' feels so remote, and this Onion article parodies the difficulties of actually achieving this.  On a personal note, Chad Emmett taught the "Geography of the Middle East" course while I was at BYU and I've always appreciated his perspective; here are his thoughts on recent events.  


TagsIsraelPalestineconflictpoliticalborders.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 3:57 PM

APHG-U3 & U4

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Visualizing Time and Space

Visualizing Time and Space | GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

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sriddle geo's curator insight, July 24, 6:04 AM

Once again the educator in me is at work.  My little girl is asking me all the time , "If it's day here is it night on the other side of the world?"  Now I can show her.

Cory Erlandson's curator insight, July 24, 6:48 AM

Great spatial representation of time and time zones, which is a weirdly fascinating topic for my students.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 4:00 PM

APHG-U1

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Refugee Camp for Syrians in Jordan Evolves as a Do-It-Yourself City

Refugee Camp for Syrians in Jordan Evolves as a Do-It-Yourself City | GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
As the sprawling Zaatari camp evolves into an informal city — with an economy and even gentrification — aid workers say camps can be potential urban incubators that benefit host countries like Jordan.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 7, 9:03 AM

This is an intriguing article that explores the difficulties of forced migrations that arise from civil war, but it also looks at city planning as refugee camps are established to make homes for the displaced.  These camps have become into de-facto cities. The maps, videos and photographs embedded in the article show the rapid development of these insta-cities which organically have evolved to fit the needs of incoming refugees.  Size not investing in permanent infrastructure has some serious social, sanitation and financial cost, there are some efforts to add structure to the chaos, to formalize the informal.  Truly this is a fascinating case study of in urban geography as we are increasingly living on what Mike Davis refers to as a "Planet of Slums."  


Tags: refugees, migration, conflict, political, warsquatter, urban, planning, density, urbanism, unit 7 cities. 

Enrico De Angelis's curator insight, July 13, 8:06 AM

beautiful intriguing post telling the story of something I - personally - never considered. It pictures a new city growing, with not only basic needs, ...

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 4:02 PM

APHG-U4

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3 Good Resources for History Teachers ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

3 Good Resources for History Teachers ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Linda Denty's insight:

I'm putting this in my Geography tab, as I don't have one specifically for history.

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Poisoned Poor Killed In Millions By Pollution

Poisoned Poor Killed In Millions By Pollution | GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
The Global Alliance on Health and Pollution calls for a war against pollution to save the lives of more than eight million people annually. David Biello reports.
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Gallery: What inequality looks like

Gallery: What inequality looks like | GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Artists, designers, photographers and activists share one image that encapsulates what inequality means to them.

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Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, June 16, 6:28 AM

Galería de Imágenes acerca de la desigualdad como consecuencia de la pobreza.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 17, 6:32 AM

powerful images that define unit 6!

Rianne Tolsma's curator insight, June 18, 4:07 AM

add your insight...

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Water = education

More than half of all young women in Ethiopia aged 15-24 cannot read or write. Girls like Manuhlshal fall behind in their education because they spend hours walking long distances each day...
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Cartographic Anomalies: How Map Projections Have Shaped Our Perceptions of the World

Cartographic Anomalies: How Map Projections Have Shaped Our Perceptions of the World | GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

Elizabeth Borneman explores how cartography and cartographic projections help and hinder our perception of the world.

"How do you think the world (starting with our perceptions) could change if the map looked differently? What if Australia was on top and the hemispheres switched? By changing how we look at a map we truly can begin to explore and change our assumptions about the world we live in."

 

Geography doesn’t just teach us about the Earth; it provides ways for thinking about the Earth that shapes how we see the world.  Maps do the same; they represent a version of reality and that influences how we think about places. 

 

Tags: mapping, perspective.


Via Seth Dixon
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CHS AP Human Geography's curator insight, August 14, 2:30 PM

Use as small cards that students can sort in small groups?  Post as gallery walk?  Skill builder to identify areas of distortion (shape, area, distance, etc)?  

HumdeBut's curator insight, August 15, 1:15 AM

bien intéressant !

YEC Geo's curator insight, August 15, 7:03 AM

I love maps, but it's easy to forget that reproducing a three-dimensional object on a two-dimensional surface involves many trade-offs.  This article highlights those trade-offs.

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Odds of El Niño Weather Pattern Drop, but Still Expected to Form

Odds of El Niño Weather Pattern Drop, but Still Expected to Form | GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
El Niño conditions are still trying to form in the Pacific Ocean
-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ebola Declared a Public Health Emergency

Ebola Declared a Public Health Emergency | GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
The World Health Organization's announcement could shift the focus to basic public health
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Charting culture

"This animation distils hundreds of years of culture into just five minutes. A team of historians and scientists wanted to map cultural mobility, so they tracked the births and deaths of notable individuals like David, King of Israel, and Leonardo da Vinci, from 600 BC to the present day. Using them as a proxy for skills and ideas, their map reveals intellectual hotspots and tracks how empires rise and crumble. The information comes from Freebase, a Google-owned database of well-known people and places, and other catalogues of notable individuals. The team is based at the University of Texas at Dallas."


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MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 7:47 AM

APHG-U3

wereldvak's curator insight, August 13, 7:00 AM

Geografische concepten als stedelijke ontwikkeling en diffusie patronen worden zichtbaar. Primate city en rank-size rule.....en demografische veranderingen in gebeiden.

José Antonio Díaz Díaz's curator insight, August 19, 5:47 AM

"Animación que pretende mostrar la complejidad cultura cinco minutos, tomando como referencias sujetos como David, rey de Israel, y Leonardo da Vinci , de 600 C. hasta llegar a nuestros días. La Información proviene de Freebase, base de datos propiedad de Google.  Los desarrolladores pertenecen a la Universidad de Tejas en Dallas ".

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15 Maps That Don't Explain the Middle East at All

15 Maps That Don't Explain the Middle East at All | GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
The region as it never was, could have been, and sort of is 
Linda Denty's insight:

Another addition to the "maps might not be all you need for information" issue.

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Yes, Yellowstone's Roads Just Melted. No, There's No Reason to Panic

Yes, Yellowstone's Roads Just Melted. No, There's No Reason to Panic | GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"Last week, a major tourist thruway in Yellowstone National Park had to be shut down because the road melted. The road’s Wicked Witch of the West impression was caused by high temperatures in both the air and under the ground. Yellowstone sits atop a volcanic hotspot, and that heat helped cause the asphalt to soften and oil to well up onto the surface."

 


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Why do competitors open their stores next to one another?

 

"Why are all the gas stations, cafes and restaurants in one crowded spot? As two competitive cousins vie for ice-cream-selling domination on one small beach, discover how game theory and the Nash Equilibrium inform these retail hotspots."


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Cory Erlandson's curator insight, July 24, 6:46 AM

Nice intersection of geo and economics (for the social studies teachers out there) on a very high-interest topic.

Nancy Watson's curator insight, July 25, 7:02 AM

Hoteling model

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 3:56 PM

APHG-U6

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Urban Growth Defines This Century

Urban Growth Defines This Century | GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
How existing cities expand and new cities emerge will determine how humanity fares in the 21st century. David Biello reports
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Global Multidimensional Poverty Index

Global Multidimensional Poverty Index | GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"The global Multidimensional Poverty Index (MPI) is an international measure of acute poverty covering over 100 developing countries. It complements traditional income-based poverty measures by capturing the severe deprivations that each person faces at the same time with respect to education, health and living standards."


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Catherine Smyth's curator insight, July 21, 8:21 PM

Making sense of poverty.

 

Gina Panighetti's curator insight, August 4, 1:54 PM

"Access"--North America Unit

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 4:01 PM

APHG-U2 & U6

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Where Will The World's Water Conflicts Erupt?

Where Will The World's Water Conflicts Erupt? | GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

As the climate shifts, rivers will both flood and dry up more often, according to the latest report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Shortages are especially likely in parts of the world already strapped for water, so political scientists expect feuds will become even more intense. To track disputes worldwide, researchers at Oregon State University spent a decade building a comprehensive database of international exchanges—-both conflicts and alliances—over shared water resources. They found that countries often begin disputes belligerently but ultimately reach peaceful agreements. Says Aaron Wolf, the geographer who leads the project, “For me the really interesting part is how even Arabs and Israelis, Indians and Pakistanis, are able to resolve their differences and find a solution.”


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Ma. Caridad Benitez's curator insight, June 19, 6:44 AM

El bien más preciado.  El recurso agotable más subvalorado del planeta. 

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, June 20, 11:50 AM

Questões políticas... 

J. Mark Schwanz's curator insight, June 21, 8:01 AM

Add water to geography education curriculum? You better believe it. The crisis of the 21st century is and will be water.  

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The Beginning of a Caliphate: The Spread of ISIS, in Five Maps

The Beginning of a Caliphate: The Spread of ISIS, in Five Maps | GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
With Tuesday's seizure of Mosul, Iraq's second largest city, the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria notched a major victory in its campaign to create a new country containing parts of what had part of both Syria and Iraq. On Wednesday, the insurgents continued their march south, taking control of Tikrit, the hometown of Saddam Hussein.
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Stunning Photos Of Earth From Above Will Change Your Outlook Of The Planet

Stunning Photos Of Earth From Above Will Change Your Outlook Of The Planet | GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
This daily dose of satellite photos helps you appreciate the beauty and intricacy of the things humans have constructed--as well as the devastating...

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Lola Ripollés's curator insight, June 15, 5:58 AM

Amazing.

Diane Johnson's curator insight, June 15, 8:19 AM

Great images for giving students a global perspective.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 17, 6:33 AM

unit 1