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27 Ways To Inspire Innovative Thinking In Students

27 Ways To Inspire Innovative Thinking In Students | Education | Scoop.it
27 Ways To Inspire Innovative Thinking In Students by TeachThought Staff Innovating thinking is one of those awkward concepts in education--on
Via Stephania Savva, Ph.D
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Harriet Rolfe's curator insight, May 25, 10:23 PM

I like the concepts in this article- however I would love a bit more practical advice at how I extend my teaching strategies to promote innovative thinking

Lacey Mack's curator insight, May 28, 10:09 PM
Not only is the diagram attractive, it has some excellent points. Links with the flipped classroom approach and State Schooling Explicit Instruction
Stephania Savva, Ph.D's comment, June 3, 2:11 AM
Thanks for sharing this interesting article!
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The Food Capitals of Instagram

The Food Capitals of Instagram | Education | Scoop.it
Explore the popularity of some of the world’s favourite foods on Instagram. Discover Instagram’s capital of curry, which cities are big on burgers, and where pulled pork is most prolific.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 12, 2015 8:41 PM

I was talking to a good friend about the geographic distribution of poutine after watching the silliest YouTube video. (Montreal is famous for it's poutine, but is in equally widespread throughout Quebec?  Canada?  Is there a core/domain/sphere areas to be mapped? These are the questions that plague geographers.).  True, this map has it's limitations; Instagram hashtag data isn't normalized so the biggest cities tend to pop out more easily, access/use of Instagram isn't uniform, etc.  Still, what a great map to show some geographic applications of social media data.  This sort of map also nicely shows the spatial concepts of region, diffusion, concentration and distribution.  


Tags: visualizationsocial media, mapping, culturediffusion, popular culture, regions, food.

Immigration Overseas Complaints's comment, August 21, 2015 8:50 AM
Nice Post You Can Know About Our Service | http://immigrationcomplaints.india.com/post/immigration-overseas-no-complaints-always-found-positive-review-40013
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Deekit - Online Whiteboard

Deekit - Online Whiteboard | Education | Scoop.it

nicely designed whiteboardDeekit is a shared whiteboard that enables online editing using any kind of content, be it drawing, text, image, anything. A whiteboard that is available anytime, anywhere on any device.


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Liz Horrocks's curator insight, May 10, 2015 11:26 AM

Adult and Teenage students would love this - also good for out of the classroom learning, or virtual one-to-ones. 

Gav Morris's curator insight, May 15, 2015 4:04 AM

This looks interesting.

wolfgang gauss's curator insight, April 5, 4:49 AM

This looks like a really nicely designed whiteboard that runs across a range of devices.

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49 Maps That Explain The U.S.

49 Maps That Explain The U.S. | Education | Scoop.it

"49 Maps That Explain The U.S. For Dumb Foreigners--The United States is mind-boggling. Right?!"


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Matthew Richmond's curator insight, September 16, 2015 2:00 PM

Some of them are quite fascinating. Scooped from my professor.

Alex Vielman's curator insight, September 21, 2015 11:10 PM

It's to see these "maps" that "explain" the U.S. in almost a sarcastic matter. Americans are living in what researches call megaregions. After, doing our Map of the U.S. for an assignment, it becomes difficult to divide regions when one is so familiar with one area, in my case, New England. New England, or the Northeast, is considered a megaregion because there is high population density in this area. In the map that displays these megaregions, its interesting to see those areas that are emerging. For example, in the map it saids Cascadia is emegering which is the corner of the U.S., the state of Washington. 

Some people think that the U.S. population is spread throughout the whole map. Its interesting to actually realize that 47% of the U.S. has zero population. This was an awesome article thats loaded with fun interesting facts. 

Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, November 23, 2015 2:32 PM

Understanding the landscape of our Country is important. The way to best understand it is to look at maps, especially these maps, and get a hold on what the country looks like. From the height of exploration to seeing where the most trees are within the country. This map has a lot of information for anyone who has questions.

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A map of all the underwater cables that connect the internet

A map of all the underwater cables that connect the internet | Education | Scoop.it
Do you know how the internet gets across the ocean? This amazing map shows every cable that makes it possible.

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Olivier Tabary's curator insight, March 25, 2015 4:28 PM

And no, not everything has turned virtual! We still rely on concrete stuff. Cables network says a lot about the way our World works. 

Logan Haller's curator insight, May 25, 2015 9:07 PM

This article deals with unit 1 because it has to do with maps. This map shows how underwater cables connect the internet throughout the world. The cables transmit 99% of international data instantly. On this map you can also see latency. Another map in this article shows 1912 trade routes and underwater cables today. The routes are similar and the interdependency has stayed but the methods and meanings for each of these things are different. To pass the ocean is risky by the investments, and trading. Sailors took tHess risks and now the tech companies are taking them. The cables are thin in the deep water equalling 3 inches across. In addition the cables are thicker in shallower water. The interesting thing is these cables can go as deep as Mount Everest is high. 

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:12 AM

Because globalization.  


Tags: Time-Space Compression, development, technology, economic, globalization, industry, unit 6 industry.

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Evolution of the World Map

Evolution of the World Map | Education | Scoop.it
Use our interactive In Charted Waters tool which shows information & visuals on how our knowledge of the world map has evolved.
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Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, February 26, 2015 7:14 AM

History of maps

tom cockburn's curator insight, February 27, 2015 5:11 AM

Can generate some useful observations,discussions and debates in class

Samuel Meyer's curator insight, March 23, 2015 12:00 PM

It is notable that the world's map has changed much since the advent of cartography, and many believed that the Americas were part of Asia. This is represented in the map.

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Where in the World?

Where in the World? | Education | Scoop.it

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Fathie Kundie's curator insight, January 8, 2015 10:03 AM

اختبار في الجغرافيا.. عبارة عن صور مأخوذة من الجو .. حاول التعرف على الدول والمدن

Brian Wilk's comment, January 31, 2015 9:34 PM
This is Australia I think.
Henk Trimp's comment, February 1, 2015 6:37 PM
It sure is!
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35 maps that explain how America is a nation of immigrants

35 maps that explain how America is a nation of immigrants | Education | Scoop.it
Take a tour through America's immigrant heritage — at its most and least welcoming

 

American politicians, and Americans themselves, love to call themselves "a nation of immigrants": a place where everyone's family has, at some point, chosen to come to seek freedom or a better life. America has managed to maintain that self-image through the forced migration of millions of African slaves, restrictive immigration laws based on fears of "inferior" races, and nativist movements that encouraged immigrants to assimilate or simply leave.

But while the reality of America's immigrant heritage is more complicated than the myth, it's still a fundamental truth of the country's history. It's impossible to understand the country today without knowing who's been kept out, who's been let in, and how they've been treated once they arrive.

 

Tags: migration, map.


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Bob Beaven's curator insight, January 29, 2015 2:19 PM

This article is highly interesting in both historical and social contexts.  The article asserts that the United States is a nation of immigrants and there is really no such thing as just "American".  The article even states that Native Americans themselves, at one point in ancient history, crossed a land bridge that was between Russia and Alaska.  Another interesting point of the article was the fact that many of the Latino immigrants today are actually picking up the English language faster than the European immigrants of old.  Interestingly, this article leads to the conclusion that the "New World" is really comprised of immigrants of the "Old World".

Ryan Tibari's curator insight, March 24, 2015 10:06 AM

Unit 2 reflection:

I find immigration/migration maps very interesting to study. This particular map really creates a visual description of where the people who make up the United States are really from. Not only can people study their origins, but also their cultures, beliefs, and religions. The combinations of these cultural attributes is what makes America so extremely diverse. 

Mrs. Madeck's curator insight, October 1, 2015 5:56 PM

Migration

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4 simple steps to ensure you'll never, ever be tricked by an internet hoax again

4 simple steps to ensure you'll never, ever be tricked by an internet hoax again | Education | Scoop.it
You're too smart to share this nonsense

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 14, 2014 8:25 AM

Many students today are digital natives and teachers often assume that students understand how to 1) find, 2) evaluate and 3) vett online resources in a critical manner.  To read more about assessing geographic-specific resources online, see this article here. 


Tags: social media.

magnus sandberg's curator insight, November 24, 2014 9:07 AM

I would perhaps replace some of these four points with others. But that is not the most important, as any steps taken will raise awarness, and that is what we want.

rodrick rajive lal's curator insight, November 25, 2014 3:52 AM

Well, I guess we have come across incidents of Phishing and Spam e-mails? Most of these are scams that are set to draw out some money from you. Some might ask for your bank account details. 

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Universal Skills All Learners Should Know How to Do - User Generated Education

Universal Skills All Learners Should Know How to Do - User Generated Education | Education | Scoop.it
This morning I was thinking about the things that all young people should know how to do regardless of income, geographical location, life goals, etc.  I started a list – see below.  Some have “always” been true – some are unique to this century of learning.  Let me know of any other universal skills you believe young people should know how to do.

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heather bell's curator insight, December 17, 2014 10:22 PM

Adding to our thinking around UDL and the opportunities we create for learning in our classrooms

Stacy Esch's curator insight, December 19, 2014 11:08 AM

Interesting. I wonder how many of these need to be taught in college?

Mayra.Loves.Books's curator insight, December 29, 2014 4:50 PM

Great list!

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Geography of Europe Games

Geography of Europe Games | Education | Scoop.it

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Jared Medeiros's curator insight, February 18, 2015 5:49 PM

An absolutely great and fun way to learn and explore different geographic locations.  Anytime learning can be made fun or turned into a game is always a win-win.  I found myself screwing around with these mini games and before I knew it, 45 minutes had passed, and I was not as good at Geography as I thought I was.  I will be back to play/learn more!

Lena Minassian's curator insight, February 18, 2015 6:59 PM

This is an interesting way to learn geography in a more interactive way. This link provides many different games that allow you to not only play a game but learn while you do it! These games can test capitals, rivers, monarchies, countries, regions, peninsulas, battles, etc. All of these relate to Europe and can provide different learning techniques for anyone who is interested in them.

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, December 7, 2015 12:05 PM

This Toporopa is a great interaction games for people who are interested in geography. Europe has a rich history dates back to colonial times and there are many interesting facts that a lot of people does not know about it. It is fun and entertaining way to train your brain and a great review to see what you know about the world.

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Overcoming the Motivation Challenge in eLearning: 5 Things You Can Do

Overcoming the Motivation Challenge in eLearning: 5 Things You Can Do | Education | Scoop.it
Motivation in eLearning can best be described with a U-shaped curve: novelty and enthusiasm produce high drive at the beginning, but it drops off sharply thereafter, only increasing when the end of the course is in sight. It is up to you to boost and maintain your students' motivation throughout the course, so that they will get the most out of it. Unless they have the motivation to focus and sit through the entire course, they learn nothing at all.

Though every student responds differently, here are some fundamental guidelines you can use to keep your learners motivation levels high from that first splash to the finish line.

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Becky Roehrs's curator insight, October 29, 2014 11:07 AM

Creating bite-sized learning lessons is key..

Donna Farren's curator insight, October 29, 2014 11:22 AM

Interesting and reassuring to know ideas I was learning 10+ years ago in graduate school are still the foundation of good elearning.

Bob MacKie's curator insight, October 29, 2014 12:54 PM
4. Engage students with each other is particularly important. Groupwork may not be initially greeted enthusiastically but online collaboration is the future. Often trepidation is replaced by appreciation of new found colleagues with a common interest.
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Launch your own online school, create your online courses in minutes

Launch your own online school, create your online courses in minutes | Education | Scoop.it

Create and organize your courses, include video and audio, share PowerPoint and PDF, an integrated payment system, EDUonGo gives you everything you need launch and manage your online school.



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Akhtar Hameed Khan's curator insight, October 20, 2014 1:05 AM

Teaching young boys and girls to understand the principles of accounting in easy steps is my goal.

Miguel Paul Trijaud Calderón's curator insight, December 23, 2014 4:39 PM

Mas tecnologia para una experiencia de aprendizaje cada vez mas global...

Harish Magan's comment, February 4, 2015 10:23 PM
nice courses
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Tsunami Animation

"The largest earthquake ever recorded by instruments struck southern Chile on May 22, 1960. This 9.5 magnitude earthquake generated a tsunami that crossed the Pacific Ocean, killing as many as 2000 people in Chile and Peru, 61 people in Hilo, Hawaii, and 142 people in Japan as well as causing damage in the Marquesas Islands (Fr. Polynesia), Samoa, New Zealand, Australia, the Philippines, and in Alaska's Aleutian Islands.  To see how this tsunami compares with two recent tsunamis from Chile, please watch http://youtu.be/qoxTC3vIF1U "

 

Tags: physical, geomorphology, water, tectonics, disasters, video.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 24, 2015 8:19 AM

In 1700, Japan was hit by a tsunami; they knew that tsunamis were caused by earthquakes, but there was no earthquake of that magnitude in Japan that could have caused it.  They called it the Orphan Tsunami, and it puzzled everyone.  Centuries later, data confirmed that a massive earthquake in the Pacific Northwest occurred in 1700 and it's tsunami traveled across the ocean much like the this computer simulation of the 1960 Chile earthquake.   

Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, September 24, 2015 9:23 PM

Tsunami ocurrido en Chile el 22 de Mayo de 1960 donde murieron 2000 personas en Chile y Perú, 61 en Hilo Hawaii, 142 en Japón causando daños en Islas Marquesas Polinesia , Samoa, Nueva Zelanda, Australia, Filipinas, Alaska's Islas Aleutianas.....enlace para ver la comparación con el Tsunamis recientes en Chile (2015)

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Prayer in Various Global Faiths

Prayer in Various Global Faiths | Education | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 20, 2015 12:15 PM

See how people around the world pray...video examples of prayer and the cultural/spiritual significance are shown highlighting Buddhists, Mormons, and Sikhs.  Place is very important component to prayer for many and the 4th example shows how some use a labyrinth as a tool to commune with the divine.


Tags: religion, culture, Christianity, Buddhism.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 1, 2015 9:54 AM

unit 3

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 1, 2015 9:55 AM

unit 3

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Kahoot! as a Review Tool

Kahoot! as a Review Tool | Education | Scoop.it
Kahoot! is a classroom response system which creates an engaging learning space, through a game-based digital pedagogy. Kahoot! is an easy-to-use blended learning platform which works on any device, making the classroom interactive, encouraging both educators and learners to ask great questions.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 11, 2015 3:36 PM

Here are resources to join the 166,000 students preparing to take the AP Human Geography Exam this Friday:

  • Above is the link to a Kahoot! APHG review...a good way to gamify the review process.  
  • There is also this APHG Kahoot! interactive quiz--in this one the students match a development clue to a regional map.
  • This Prezi is a systemic, unit-by-unit review of major ideas. 


Tags: APHG.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 2015 9:47 AM

test review

Sally Spoon's curator insight, August 6, 2015 12:23 AM

Here are resources to join the 166,000 students preparing to take the AP Human Geography Exam this Friday:

Above is the link to a Kahoot! APHG review...a good way to gamify the review process.  
There is also this APHG Kahoot! interactive quiz--in this one the students match a development clue to a regional map.This Prezi is a systemic, unit-by-unit review of major ideas. Here’s a student-produced study guide for the APHG test focusing on the ‘big ideas.’ 
Here is a Trivia Pursuit review game with over 400 color-coded question prepared by  Lorrie Etheridge.Since some reviews don't take into account the 2013 changes, I created this hyperlinked Slideshare presentation to explain the changes.  For you Apple users, you can invest in iScore5. 


Tags: APHG.

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Map Projections

Map Projections | Education | Scoop.it

A map projection is used to portray all or part of the round Earth on a flat surface. This cannot be done without some distortion.  Every projection has its own set of advantages and disadvantages. There is no "best" projection.  The mapmaker must select the one best suited to the needs, reducing distortion of the most important features.  Mapmakers and mathematicians have devised almost limitless ways to project the image of the globe onto paper. Scientists at the U. S. Geological Survey have designed projections for their specific needs—such as the Space Oblique Mercator, which allows mapping from satellites with little or no distortion.  This document gives the key properties, characteristics, and preferred uses of many historically important projections and of those frequently used by mapmakers today.


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Carlee Allen's curator insight, March 26, 2015 6:58 PM

This article explains and talks about 18 specific map projections. It gives a lot of detail about all of them, and describes the disadvantages and uses for all of them.

 

I thought that this was interesting because I learned more about map projections, and actually how people use them.

Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, March 27, 2015 2:05 AM

This is so useful for primary students

Christopher L. Story's curator insight, March 27, 2015 9:59 AM

Some review help

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Learning Theory v5 - What are the established learning theories?

Learning Theory v5 - What are the established learning theories? | Education | Scoop.it

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Richard Whiteside's curator insight, February 27, 2015 4:53 AM

Really useful mindmap with links to further info about the theories and theorists. Shame it isn't in an easily downloadable format.

Cris Mepham's curator insight, February 27, 2015 6:52 AM

If you need a few ideas!

Dennis Danielson's curator insight, May 6, 2015 7:46 PM

This one really helped me to see a bigger picture of the many Learning Theories and some of their connections.

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8 Classic storytelling techniques for engaging presentations

8 Classic storytelling techniques for engaging presentations | Education | Scoop.it
A good public speaker takes their audience on a journey, leaving them feeling inspired and motivated. But structuring your speech to get your ideas across and keep your audience engaged all the way through is tricky. Try these eight storytelling techniques for a presentation that wows.

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Raquel Oliveira's curator insight, March 10, 2015 3:51 PM

Contação de historias como modelo milenar de aprendizagem de adultos #avancee

Rosemary Tyrrell, Ed.D.'s curator insight, March 13, 2015 8:05 PM

Worth sharing. 

Andrea Stewart's curator insight, March 21, 2015 4:55 PM

Great techniques for teaching or professional development. The article gives video examples of each.

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Worldwide, Many See Belief in God as Essential to Morality

Worldwide, Many See Belief in God as Essential to Morality | Education | Scoop.it

"The position [that belief in God is essential to morality] is highly prevalent, if not universal, in Africa and the Middle East. At least three-quarters in all six countries surveyed in Africa say that faith in God is essential to morality.   People in richer nations tend to place less emphasis on the need to believe in God to have good values than people in poorer countries do."


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Jason Schneider's curator insight, January 26, 2015 7:37 PM

It would make sense that Indonesia is one of the most religious countries in the world being that it has the highest Muslim population. Also, I never thought of Europe as being religious countries which is why I am not surprised that 70% of Europe does not believe that the belief in God needs to be moral. Another reason why I am not surprised is because they are more popular for their ethnic groups such as the french group, italian group and german group. Also, they don't have focused religions. For example, Buddhism was originated in Nepal and worshipped mostly in China, Hinduism was originated in India, Jewish was originated in Israel and Islam was originated in Saudi Arabia and it's practiced mostly in Indonesia and Pakistan. That explains why most parts of Asia (at least southern Asia) has practices specific religions.

Chris Plummer's curator insight, January 27, 2015 11:58 PM

Summary- This figure explains the relationship between regions and their morality based on a God. It is evident what in North America is is almost a 50 50 tie between between believing in god is essential for morality. Only is Europe does God seem less important than the rest of the world. There are other countries such as Chile, Argentina, or Australia that have these same beliefs, but for the most part, most countries see a believe in God as an essential to morality. 

 

Insight- In unit 3 we study the distributions of many things, religion included. Why do so many poorer countries have a stronger faith in God than wealthier ones? It may be because if their ethnic backgrounds, but I think there is more to it. I think when a country is poorer, more people reach out to their God for help. I also think that in wealthier countries there are distractions from religion such as video games and other mass produced technologies that get in the way of people researching their faith.

Ryan Tibari's curator insight, May 27, 2015 9:55 AM

Unit 3: This article shows the relationship between regions and their morality based on a God. It is evident what in North America is is almost a 50 50 tie between between believing in god is essential for morality. There are other countries such as Chile, Argentina, or Australia that have these same beliefs, but for the most part, most countries see a believe in God as an essential to morality. 

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Mapping World Religions


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Elle Reagan's curator insight, March 22, 2015 3:17 PM

This was a nice video of good length that allowed me to see how the world is broke up into different regions. I know that religion is a main factor of how places are divided and so I thought this video was a nice visualization of that. The map with the timeline was nice to have and I liked how it gave us an estimate of how many people are following each religion today. The video also helped me see how religion can be a main factor in defining world regions.

Jacqueline Garcia pd1's curator insight, March 22, 2015 3:26 PM

In this video we are able to see the growth and fall of religions. It was quite fascinating to see the number of people in each religion and where in the world the spread. I thought it was helpful to see the dates of events that either caused spread or destruction of religions . For example the birth of Muhammad and the Crusades. THis shows the spatial distribution of religion. 

Ryan Tibari's curator insight, May 27, 2015 9:58 AM

This video puts world religions in a more basic form. Shows the patterns that religions take on a global scale, outlining the most prominent and least prominent throughout the world. 

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Peru Is Indignant After Greenpeace Makes Its Mark on Ancient Site

Peru Is Indignant After Greenpeace Makes Its Mark on Ancient Site | Education | Scoop.it
A sign urging environmental action during a United Nations summit meeting on climate change was placed near a 1,000-year-old geoglyph that is a cultural treasure in Peru. Officials are outraged over the trespassing and the disturbance of the ancient grounds.

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Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, May 6, 2015 8:36 AM

In today's world, we often run into situations where preservation and advancement are at odds with one another. Instances where sites or areas are protected by historical or cultural heritage societies is just one such example. As a result, these places are often barred from making improvements or changes that would improve the quality of life for the people living there. Some places, however, also possess a natural geography that is significant and culturally valuable to the people living there. To change or mar these geographic landmarks is considered incredibly disrespectful and inconsiderate, as is the case with this Greenpeace blunder in Peru. 

 

The incident described in this article also seems to represent a kind of disconnect between the developed and developing worlds. Many times, developed nations feel it is there job to police the practices and beliefs of their less developed neighbors. This, of course, is a very insulting and elitist approach to enacting change that these countries see as positive. Often, the cultures and practices of these places are scorned for the sake of "progress" or "advancement", when in reality, these powerful countries are using their almost unquestioned influence to get their message across using the context of smaller, less powerful countries. Organizations and countries that are truly proponents of change and progress must strike a balance between cultural respect and effective methods. 

Chris Costa's curator insight, September 28, 2015 11:25 AM

People make mistakes with the best of intentions, and this is certainly a case of just that. Greenpeace hoped to make a lasting impression on world leaders by creating a powerful symbol illustrating the need for the world's leaders to embark on a policy of environmental conservatism; instead, they insulted the Peruvian government and desecrated a national heritage site. I feel like something like this would never have happened in a powerful Western nation; could you imagine the outrage if a historical site like the location of the Battle of Gettysburg or Jefferson's home of Monticello had been altered in such a away? Or if this sign had been hung from Big Ben or the Eiffel Tower? I feel like this group completely disregarded the sensitivities of the Peruvian government because it is only a "middle power," a nation that could easily be trumped by the group's ambitions- in short, that the nations concerns did not matter because it was "only" Peru. I find that train of thought extremely insulting and dangerous within the context of international relations- if smaller nations can be disregarded so easily in Western circles, what does that say for the future of global politics? An apology and, more importantly, a restoration project are in order, and Peru is right to demand them. I, too, would be insulted by Greenpeace's actions.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 12:23 PM

an environmental group disturbing on of the regions where man has been banned from going is insane. how do you justify defacing one of the last truly pristine places on earth, where people haven't walked for centuries, for the sake of some Eco-terrorism. did you not think through the response that this act would inspire, and if so, how did you become so dense?

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The Second Languages Of Every Part Of The World In One Incredible Infographic

The Second Languages Of Every Part Of The World In One Incredible Infographic | Education | Scoop.it
Some of these will surprise you.


Tags: language, culture.


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Christopher L. Story's curator insight, November 7, 2014 9:59 AM

any surprises?

Caterin Victor's curator insight, November 7, 2014 2:35 PM

It is never a second language,  my grandmother used to say : "As many languages you learn, is never to much, never enought".!!

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The Science of Earthquakes

The Science of Earthquakes | Education | Scoop.it
From fault types to the Ring of Fire to hydraulic fracking, the Earthquakes infographic by Weather Underground helps us understand the complexities of what shakes the ground.

 

Tags: disasters, geomorphology, physical, infographic.


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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, June 1, 2015 2:14 AM

Australian Curriculum

The causes, impacts and responses to a geomorphological hazard (ACHGK053)


GeoWorld 8

Chapter 4: Hazards: causes, impacts and responses

(4.5 - 4.6 Earthquakes)

Ness Crouch's curator insight, July 6, 2015 10:05 PM

Excellent infographic for showing Earthquakes :)

Jason Nemecek's curator insight, March 2, 2:00 PM

Australian Curriculum

The causes, impacts and responses to a geomorphological hazard (ACHGK053)

 

GeoWorld 8

Chapter 4: Hazards: causes, impacts and responses

(4.5 - 4.6 Earthquakes)

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Social Learning Platform, Simple Learning Management

Social Learning Platform, Simple Learning Management | Education | Scoop.it

Learning is happening inside an active Chalkup Discussion. Whether it’s a burning question that a student just asked and got answered, a quick class poll, or that perfect video to go with today’s lesson, your class is never more active and connected than it is on Chalkup.


Via Nik Peachey
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Nik Peachey's curator insight, September 7, 2014 6:47 AM

This looks like a useful tool for managing your classroom and communicating with students and parents. It promises to always be free.