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Play to Learn: Designing Effective Learning Gam...

Play to Learn: Designing Effective Learning Gam... | Education | Scoop.it
Learning games are a hot, hot trend - but why? What makes them work and how in the world do you go about designing one? (I love design!
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Rescooped by Kelly Ferguson from Great Maths Teaching Ideas
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Rita Pierson: Every kid needs a champion | Video on TED.com

Rita Pierson, a teacher for 40 years, once heard a colleague say, "They don't pay me to like the kids." Her response: "Kids don't learn from people they don’t like.’” A rousing call to educators to believe in their students and actually connect...

Via William Emeny
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William Emeny's curator insight, May 5, 2013 5:38 AM

She's totally right :-)

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4 Keys To Designing A Project-Based Learning Classroom - TeachThought

4 Keys To Designing A Project-Based Learning Classroom - TeachThought | Education | Scoop.it
What are the keys designing a project-based learning classroom? It starts with the teacher.
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Rescooped by Kelly Ferguson from Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
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Health News - Popular movies help children improve literacy

Health News - Popular movies help children improve literacy | Education | Scoop.it
Popular movies help children improve literacy

Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, May 20, 2013 12:58 PM

 What a great idea!

 

A simple concept. Enhance literacy education by starting with an established engagement. Kids already like children's movies. So, why not turn OFF the sound track and turn on subtitles? 

 

Just a little Vygotsy nudge within an established zone of proximal development where overcoming even the slightest forces of resistance is essentially a mute point since they already know that they enjoy seeing children's movies they haven't seen before.

 

It is sort of a variation of an established option in many digital children's books where pre-literate children can opt to turn on an audio reading feature that highlights the digital text word by word as the child listens to the reading while his or her eyes are directed towards the words being spoken.

 

It's finding that bridge between an established engagement and activities that build off of that existing engagement. It's more than "just a connection." Sure, Romeo and Juliet has much to say about gang-mentality and teen romance. But, high school students come with as many attitudes regarding gang-mentality and teen romance as .... well, too many to make assumptions that the connection itself is a reliable bridge. For many students, gangs are security in a world far more insecure than the worlds of their teachers or a far more supportive "famila" than the biological family that they have actual biological connections to while others in the same classroom may have family beliefs embracing tolerance and respect for people of different spiritual and cultural traditions while others have family beliefs much less tolerant or, let's face it, often quite intolerant of people's beliefs and cultural traditions. 

 

A simple example of the point I'm trying to make is to imagine what the student engagement might be in a very diverse classroom if Shakespeare had written "Romeo and Julius." 

 

Of course, I realize I've shifted the attention to older students, but the point might be, the variables of every single student are a unique combination of influences so it is rarely a safe bet to assume that we're providing a "precision-zone-of-proximal-development-targeted" learning experience with pancea-like effectiveness by assuming a connection will engage.

 

"Hey! You're a teenager. Romeo was a teenager. You're going to like this story." An inviting bridge? Maybe. Maybe not.

 

There is a difference between "finding connections" between our students and the learning experiences we design or employ and designing learning experiences with significant and broad pre-existing elements of perceived enjoyment and relevance. 

 

My guess is that popular children's movies are created with significant attention to every single element of storytelling that the industry has found  profitable at the box office in as many different families, neighborhoods and cultural settings as possible. And, thereby, perhaps that might make them a more dependable and inviting bridge from the known to the nearby unknown.

 

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

 

 

 

 

Rescooped by Kelly Ferguson from About Art & Creativity
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Examining The Importance Of The Arts In Primary Schools

Examining The Importance Of The Arts In Primary Schools | Education | Scoop.it
Art is how we first started communicating and it is one of the few forms of pure expression. Let's work together to keep that spirit alive in our children!

Via Spyros Thalassinos
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Rescooped by Kelly Ferguson from Educational Technology News
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Infographic: The Rise of EduTech in K-12 Classrooms

Infographic: The Rise of EduTech in K-12 Classrooms | Education | Scoop.it

"Technology affects  the lesson planning and professional development of teachers. Respondents to the Pew survey were described as tech-savvy overall, but they still had to put in extra work to master technological tools.

Refer to the infographic below to take a tour of the classrooms of Ms. Digital and Mr. Tech, and explore how EduTech is used in education, how successful it is, and how it affects students and educators."


Via EDTECH@UTRGV
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Rescooped by Kelly Ferguson from Empathy and Compassion
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Playlist : Learning Through Empathy - Elementary - NFB

Playlist : Learning Through Empathy - Elementary - NFB | Education | Scoop.it

This playlist offers elementary school teachers unique Canadian resources that will help students explore, discuss, and ultimately express empathy, an essential skill for navigating the diversity and conflicts inherent in our global community.

 

At the most basic level, empathy can be described as “the ability to understand and share the feelings of another.” Empathy allows children to see the world from other people’s perspectives and to walk, if only for a few steps, in their shoes.

 

In schools, empathetic children listen to conflicting points of view and are capable of exploring peaceful solutions. When they see someone being hurt or bullied, these children refuse to be passive bystanders; instead, they speak up. Young people with a strong sense of empathy extend a helping 


Via Edwin Rutsch
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Rescooped by Kelly Ferguson from Learning Technology News
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NCLE Report: Remodeling Literacy Learning

NCLE Report: Remodeling Literacy Learning | Education | Scoop.it

The most effective school systems in the world design their schools so that teachers spendsubstantial portions of their day working alongside other educators to think through challengestogether. Teachers, librarians, literacy coaches, principals, school leaders, families, communitymembers, and policymakers all can help address the challenges in literacy education today.


Via Nik Peachey
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Nik Peachey's curator insight, May 13, 2013 4:51 AM

Useful report, particularly the recommendation for more collaboration between educators.

Laina McDonald, Ed.D's curator insight, May 13, 2013 2:06 PM

Collaboration should be coveted in schools