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Rescooped by Johann Harmse from Digital Citizenship: Resources for South African Teachers
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Can we afford not to privately educate our children?

Can we afford not to privately educate our children? | Education | Scoop.it

Last week the Centre for Development and Enterprise (CDE) published a report titled ‘Affordable Private Schools In South Africa’. This report is the third one produced by the CDE on private education choices for the poor and it examines the market dynamics of low-cost private education in much more detail. Whatever your feelings on state versus private education, it appears that the latter’s role in South Africa will become increasingly important. By PAUL BERKOWITZ.


Via Andrew van Zyl
Johann Harmse's insight:

A more in depth look at low cost private schools in South Africa. This piece focuses on the role these private schools may play in supporting the economy and the 'market dynamics of low-cost private education.' Broad themes relating to independent (non-state) schools in South Africa are also discussed. The piece makes a strong case for low-cost private schools, indicating how they may result in a number of positive changes relating to teachers, students and the South African economy.

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Rescooped by Johann Harmse from Digital Citizenship: Resources for South African Teachers
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SA education system is failing pupils, economy - Cape Times | IOL.co.za

SA education system is failing pupils, economy - Cape Times | IOL.co.za | Education | Scoop.it

Cape Town - The effects of South Africa’s failing education system are increasingly being felt by companies which are unable to find the personnel they need to ensure continued growth.

Of the over 200 South African companies participating in a recent survey, 80 percent indicated they were experiencing a skills crisis and many of these show considerable reliance on external expertise. Adcorp recently published that over 800 000 high-skilled positions, over a wide range of occupations, are currently unfilled in South Africa.


Via Andrew van Zyl
Johann Harmse's insight:

The effects of the poor education system on the South African economy. A strong case is made that the ineptitude of the education department is to blame, citing a number of individuals and occurences that relate to South Africa's education crises. A wide variety of sources, statitistics and information makes this a very good article, leaving the reader with a strong impression of the seriousness of our education problem. 

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GCSE students face new English and maths hurdle | Education ...

GCSE students face new English and maths hurdle | Education ... | Education | Scoop.it
Education secretary Michael Gove sets new demands if teenagers fail to get good enough marks in their GCSEs.
Johann Harmse's insight:

Interesting to note that education problems exist in the most developed nations in the world, with education systems far more successful than ours. Even without the legacy of Apartheid and the perceived ineptitude of the administration of the education department, problems are to be expected and can exist apart from the actions of administration. In short, be kinder to the education department, even Britian doesn't have theirs all under control.

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Rescooped by Johann Harmse from Digital Citizenship: Resources for South African Teachers
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Private school for less - City Press

Private school for less - City Press | Education | Scoop.it

 

They are not fancy. The fees are quite low, but education standards are high. Is this the future for your child? Sipho Masondo went back to school.

 

Just the mention of a “private school” elicits mental images of imposing, architecturally marvellous buildings, magnificent green sports fields – and astronomical fees, running into the hundreds of thousands.

But Meridian Pretoria is an entirely different beast. It’s a low-fee private school in Pretoria’s East Lynne suburb.


Via Andrew van Zyl
Johann Harmse's insight:

Very interesting and surprisingly innovative address to a gap in South African society. Privite schools with no more than 30 students in a class, as low as 13 in some, all using tablets in the classroom. This could potentially allow many children the opportunity to escape poverty and create a much more skilled workforce desperately needed by this country. 

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The Global Search for Education: Japan

The Global Search for Education: Japan | Education | Scoop.it
Many consider Japanese primary and junior secondary level education to be exceptional, yet Manabu Sato believes the quality of his country's senior secondary and higher education is questionable. T...
Johann Harmse's insight:

Further insight into the weaknesses of education systems of developed other nations. Although 'Japanese primary and junior secondary level education is excellent, the quality of senior secondary and higher education is disputable,' a result of a lack of school involvement and student apathy at secondary and higher levels. A comprehensive plan is outlined here to fix the issue, which is more than can be said for South Africa.

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