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How To Add Rigor To Anything

How To Add Rigor To Anything | Learning Never Stops | Scoop.it

"

"Rigor is a fundamental piece of any learning experience.

It is also among the most troublesome due to its relativity. Rigorous for whom? And more importantly, how can you “cause” it?

Barbara Blackburn, author of “Rigor is not a 4-Letter Word,” shared 5 “myths” concerning rigor, and they are indicative of the common misconceptions: that difficult, dry, academic, sink-or-swim learning is inherently rigorous.

Myth #1: Lots of Homework is a Sign of Rigor
Myth #2: Rigor Means Doing More
Myth #3: Rigor is Not For Everyone
Myth #4: Providing Support Means Lessening Rigor
Myth #5: Resources Do Not Equal Rigor"


Via Beth Dichter
Hanya Lamp's insight:

Rigor is not "more of it;" it's scaffolding towards greater complexity.

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, September 27, 2013 4:29 PM

How can we add rigor to lesson plans? For 10 strategies check out this post. Five of the strategies are listed below (with more information about them in the post):
* Necessitate a transfer of knowledge

* Require students to synthesizing multiple sources

* Design tasks with multiple steps that build cognitively

* Use divergent perspectives

* Use divergent media forms

The post also provides a great Rigor Rubric that looks at the four levels (as in Level 1, 2, 3 and 4 as found in the new assessment for Race to the Top) as well as two areas, Curriculum and Instruction. Curriculum is divided into Content, Connections, Perspective and Texts/Materials. Instruction is divided into Delivery by Teacher, Depth and Reflection.

Consider sharing this rubric in your school and engaging teachers in a discussion of how we can best provide rigor to our students.

Kathy Lynch's curator insight, September 28, 2013 12:38 AM

Thanks Beth!

David Baker's curator insight, September 29, 2013 6:48 PM

10 steps and Myths for Rigor will be a really good conversation at PIE.

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Fantastic talk by Professor Dorit Aharonov on Feldenkrais principles applied to learning and creativity. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0FUlRjBcGG A Feldenkrais Lesson for the Beginner Scientist:...

Professor Dorit Aharonov will talk about how principles she had learned in her practice of body-mind methods, and the Feldenkrais method in particular, can b...
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Catholic scholars blast Common Core in letter to U.S. bishops

Catholic scholars blast Common Core in letter to U.S. bishops | Learning Never Stops | Scoop.it
They urge the bishops not to adopt the standards -- or to abandon them in dioceses that have already adopted them.
Hanya Lamp's insight:

U.S. Common Core adoption is not without controversy. The text of the letter published by the Washington Post raises a number of valid questions.

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Rescooped by Hanya Lamp from Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
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NYC: Success Academy parent's secret tapes reveal attempt to push out special needs student | NY Daily News

NYC: Success Academy parent's secret tapes reveal attempt to push out special needs student | NY Daily News | Learning Never Stops | Scoop.it

Call them the charter school tapes.

 

The parent of a special education kindergarten pupil at the Upper West Side Success Academy charter school secretly tape recorded meetings in which school administrators pressed her to transfer her son back into the public school system.

 

The tapes, a copy of which the mother supplied the Daily News, poke a hole in claims by the fast-growing Success Academy chain founded by former City Councilwoman Eva Moskowitz that it doesn’t try to push out students with special needs or behavior problems.

 

Nancy Zapata said she resorted to the secret tapes last December and again in March after school officials used their “zero tolerance” discipline policy to repeatedly suspend her son, Yael, kept telephoning her at work to pick him up from school in the middle of the day and urged her to transfer him.

 

The News reported earlier this week that the Success network, which boasts some of the highest test scores in the city, also has far higher suspension rates than other elementary schools and that more than two dozen parents were claiming efforts to push their children out.

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Rescooped by Hanya Lamp from Eclectic Technology
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How To Add Rigor To Anything

How To Add Rigor To Anything | Learning Never Stops | Scoop.it

"

"Rigor is a fundamental piece of any learning experience.

It is also among the most troublesome due to its relativity. Rigorous for whom? And more importantly, how can you “cause” it?

Barbara Blackburn, author of “Rigor is not a 4-Letter Word,” shared 5 “myths” concerning rigor, and they are indicative of the common misconceptions: that difficult, dry, academic, sink-or-swim learning is inherently rigorous.

Myth #1: Lots of Homework is a Sign of Rigor
Myth #2: Rigor Means Doing More
Myth #3: Rigor is Not For Everyone
Myth #4: Providing Support Means Lessening Rigor
Myth #5: Resources Do Not Equal Rigor"


Via Beth Dichter
Hanya Lamp's insight:

Rigor is not "more of it;" it's scaffolding towards greater complexity.

more...
Beth Dichter's curator insight, September 27, 2013 4:29 PM

How can we add rigor to lesson plans? For 10 strategies check out this post. Five of the strategies are listed below (with more information about them in the post):
* Necessitate a transfer of knowledge

* Require students to synthesizing multiple sources

* Design tasks with multiple steps that build cognitively

* Use divergent perspectives

* Use divergent media forms

The post also provides a great Rigor Rubric that looks at the four levels (as in Level 1, 2, 3 and 4 as found in the new assessment for Race to the Top) as well as two areas, Curriculum and Instruction. Curriculum is divided into Content, Connections, Perspective and Texts/Materials. Instruction is divided into Delivery by Teacher, Depth and Reflection.

Consider sharing this rubric in your school and engaging teachers in a discussion of how we can best provide rigor to our students.

Kathy Lynch's curator insight, September 28, 2013 12:38 AM

Thanks Beth!

David Baker's curator insight, September 29, 2013 6:48 PM

10 steps and Myths for Rigor will be a really good conversation at PIE.

Rescooped by Hanya Lamp from Learning, Brain & Cognitive Fitness
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Why Extroverts Like Parties and Introverts Avoid Crowds

Why Extroverts Like Parties and Introverts Avoid Crowds | Learning Never Stops | Scoop.it
Unlike introverts, extroverts associate feel-good chemicals with their environments, new research suggests.

Via Maggie Rouman
Hanya Lamp's insight:

Interesting - this study finds brain-based strong differences in what people find rewarding and motivating. It's something we inherently know about other people...but this is quantifying research.

 

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Rescooped by Hanya Lamp from Educational Research for K-12 Teachers
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Reading a Novel Changes the Brain, Study Shows

Reading a Novel Changes the Brain, Study Shows | Learning Never Stops | Scoop.it
Reading a novel appears to produce quantifiable changes in brain activity, according to an Emory University study published this month in the journal Brain Connectivity.

Via Susan Merrick
Hanya Lamp's insight:

Interesting in light of U.S. Common Core adoption, which mandates more use of informational texts (up to 50% of the time in elementary school). Informational texts do not have a strong narrative line, and won't be producing the changes observed in this study.

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Rescooped by Hanya Lamp from Professional Learning for Busy Educators
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Learning Never Stops: 29 great math websites for students of all ages

Learning Never Stops: 29 great math websites for students of all ages | Learning Never Stops | Scoop.it

"Over the past month I have shared many math based websites. Below, I have combined all the math websites that I have shared so far and have added seven new ones. Whether you have been following my blog, or if this is your first time, I promise you will find many great math resources for your students."


Via John Evans
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Marisel Mateluna's curator insight, December 27, 2013 6:29 PM

Excellent material for teachers of Maths.

Christine Peterson's curator insight, December 29, 2013 3:09 AM

Excellent resource - especially for games and practice for the students at home