Education
Follow
919 views | +5 today
 
Rescooped by Gunnar Sewell from iPads in Education
onto Education
Scoop.it!

Improving Student Writing Using iPads - Dr. Wesley Fryer

"Slides for a series of hands-on iPad workshops by Dr. Wesley Fryer with elementary teachers in Lewisville, Texas, January 23-24, 2014. Learn more on: http://maps.playingwithmedia.com"


Via John Evans
Gunnar Sewell's insight:

While tablets such as the iPad can be a very useful tool for teachers and for student engagement, it is my strong belief that they should never replace or reduce interpersonal activities. Educators must always remember that the push to use technology in the classroom is mainly the result of high tech companies' marketing campaigns. 

more...
Susan Berkowitz's curator insight, January 25, 2014 6:31 PM

teachers often underestimate or underuse the power of the iPad

Terry Doherty's curator insight, January 27, 2014 5:45 PM

Interesting perspective ... will engaging kids in elementary school translate to the stronger writing we expect of students.

Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Gunnar Sewell from French language and French speaking countries
Scoop.it!

gramemo » Pitié, amitié et quantités

gramemo » Pitié, amitié et quantités | Education | Scoop.it

Via Spyros Kaloghiros, Magni Claudeline, Virginie Salin
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Gunnar Sewell from Canadian literature
Scoop.it!

Are Northrop Frye's ideas now DOA?

Are Northrop Frye's ideas now DOA? | Education | Scoop.it
Northrop Frye's life and letters have become a kind of academic cottage industry, but does his work have any real currency in understanding contemporary literature?

Via Gerard Beirne, Fred Stenson
Gunnar Sewell's insight:

On the writings of a Canadian literary academic

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Gunnar Sewell from Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
Scoop.it!

The voices in older literature speak differently today

The voices in older literature speak differently today | Education | Scoop.it

When we read a text, we hear a voice talking to us. Yet the voice changes over time.

 

 

The article's preface continues...

 

"...Yet the voice changes over time. In his new book titled Poesins röster, Mats Malm, professor in comparative literature at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, shows that when reading older literature, we may hear completely different voices than contemporary readers did – or not hear any voices at all."

 

 

_______________

 

Literature teachers who haven't yet, might consider allowing their existing paradigms and pedagogies to marinate in this thought-provoking article for awhile. 

 

At the black and white level, perhaps the article questions the value to contemporary young (even older) readers of bothering with works that have become "too distant" from their "zones of proximal development." The faculty room tug of wars between the proponents of the sacred canon and YA literature (or "ethnic" or "global" or "women's" literature or the use of non-canon stories and storytelling such as Sci-Fi or graphic novels or "reading" via audio novels and now via digital eReaders) are frequently loud and contentious. 

 

However, I found this article particularly interesting at the shades of gray levels.

 

It is an excellent point that a book's "voices change over time." That is, they may speak in what was at the time  "accessible" vocabulary, using what were at the time accessible sentence structures and used what were at the time commonly understood meanings for informal language usage that we might recognize as slang.

 

Today's readers may find any of those "differences" or others in the use of language and related storytelling techniques to be quite challenging. 

 

When terms such as "odds bodkins" appeared in stories, contemporary readers knew that "odds bodkins" really meant "God's body" and that "swearing on God's body" was a term used to emphasize the truth of  what one had just said. There was no real issue for contemporary readers regarding what was being said or meant. 

 

Today's student readers most often don't recognize the term"odds bodkins." Those who care then look it up, or pause to read the footnote, often to find a definition such as "God's body," only to be no less confused than they already were, wondering why a character would throw in a phrase about God's body, not realizing that it was not being used as a literal reference to either God or his body, but rather as "proof" that the speaker was not purposely being deceptive, as of course it was more commonly believed in days gone by that one might lie to another mortal, but few would lie while calling upon God to stand behind one's words.

 

And, even when the "translation" of "Odds Bodkin" is further explained by the additional phrase of "swearing by God's body," there are among current students those who find the addition of the words "swearing by" to only be further confusing assuming that the word "swearing" means to say socially unacceptable words.

 

Gadzooks!

 

What is a regular 21st century kid to do when older stories require so many pause points to work through such challenges that sooner or later, the suspension of disbelief required to enjoy and engage in a story is just too often shattered to maintain interest?

 

(for an interesting list of other "Minced Oaths see: http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/minced-oath.html)

 

Yet.. we all know that in spite of the challenges to current readers those old voices have much of value to say and generally speaking say much, much more eloquently than other attempts to express those universal themes both before and since they were captured by authors who just plain "nailed it." 

 

__________

 

AN ASIDE: "Nailed it." Now there's an interesting phrase. I can't help but wonder whether if somehow the table could be turned whereby Elizabethan "readers" (well, consumers of Elizabethan literature) had to work their way through a story contemporary to today's students  and stumble across this term, wondering what the heck it had to do with a debater's point, and guess perhaps that it might be a blasphemous reference to "something to do with" the crucifixion or perhaps a religious reference to "something to do with" the fact that Jesus had been a carpenter!

__________

 

Having taught my entire career in California where ESL students are the norm, I've often wondered at the wisdom of required reading lists, particularly for those students whose command of contemporary English varies greatly. Yet, with older literary voices, the parallel challenges to many "native speakers" are more similar to those of ESL students than we may adequately take into consideration.

 

Truthfully, required reading asks not only the struggling native speaking student, but many "A" and "B" level native speakers to swim through the language that is foreign to them in Shakespeare as English is to our ESL students.

 

And speaking of Shakespeare, his contemporary audiences never read his plays. Even if they somehow had not become aware of the term "Odds Bodkin," they had the strong visual multi-sensory context that comes with "seeing" and "hearing" a story staged and choreographed by professional set designers and directors and presented by professional actors whose mastery of tone and rehearsed reading eliminated much of the issues associated with levels of text-based reading skill levels.

 

These considerations are often a major element of the argument put forward by proponents of YA lit among other contemporary writings not considered "sophisticated enough" by the proponents of the classics. Yet, YA lit perhaps to an even greater extent than the classics, "ages" quickly, in it's common reliance upon contemporary "slang, "lingo," "colloquiallsm;" to say nothing of the lightning speed at which technology terminology and references age. I still laugh out loud when watching an episode of Seinfeld every time Jerry (short for Jerome I might proudly add) answers his "portable" phone; a brick that almost requires two hands to lift!

 

I can not suggest that either the proponents of the classics OR those of the contemporary have the better argument. If either side actually "won" the tug of war in their local faculty meeting, the literature program would lose.

 

But rather than continue the tug of war, perhaps recognizing that the wisdom of the classics has a value not as commonly found in the contemporary YA literature (which I realize may be an arguable point), while at the same time that the classics pose challenges not posed by contemporary YA literature in their requirement to comprehend very different versions of the "same language" spoken by today's student readers, particularly when that language requires the learning of obsolete vocabulary.

 

And even worse, unlike students who study French or German or Spanish or Chinese or any of the "foreign" languages taught in school who might at least hope to someday have an opportunity to actually use that second language in the real world, students learning middle English or obsolete English in order to appreciate "older voices" often simply add that challenge to a growing obstacle course to finding literary reading relevant or engaging.

 

And, at the same time recognizing that the relevance of much contemporary literature relies heavily upon fleeting relevance quickly becoming as hilariously ridiculous in the minds of some young readers as the graduation photos in their parents' high school yearbooks.

 

Perhaps rather than selecting literary titles based upon their standing among the literati, we might ask what are the best titles to employ that push readers just beyond their current levels of appreciation so their appreciation expands, but not so far beyond their current levels of appreciation that discouraging reading experiences outpace encouraging reading experiences.

 

Yet, we all know that when students find relevance in a story, even stories that are written quite a bit beyond their current levels of appreciation, they become engaged in ways that trump even their perceptions of their own reading levels.

 

In that regard, when selecting literary titles we might weigh more carefully the percentages of our students who still struggle at the basic literacy level, the percentages of our students who are destined to become scholar-level consumers of literature, and the percentage of our students who we hope to assist in becoming the beneficiaries of a life-long literary reading practice. 

 

I've found too often that it is not so much the age of the voice in a story that blocks young readers from engaging in reading, it's an almost universal baseline question, "What's this old story got to do with anything I care about?"

 

My goal was to respect where their care list was, but to also push the development of what they cared about by focusing upon how great literature is great because it gives us reasons to consider, re-consider and perhaps refine their existing perceptions of what it is that they should care about. 

 

 

A closing thought.

 

Long ago when I began contemplating what I might have to say about this article, I was convinced that I was going to make a big deal out of the irony of suggesting that "old (text) voices" have changed. I thought about one of the distinctions between those who insist on facts (as history teachers do when criticizing The Grapes of Wrath) and those who recognize the ability of fiction to contain universal truths in ways that "just the facts" don't (as The Grapes of Wrath does).

 

Afterall, those old words are still the same black and white symbols requiring decoding as they were when originally written. They still are contained in the exact same story (translations perhaps being an exception). They are often still interacted with from within the same technology of paper or digital "paper" formats.

 

But, somewhere in my mental meanderings I thought about Huck spending the last several chapters cruelly recreating his life back in St. Petersburg where the story began.

 

It is Huck himself who has changed. He understands at the end his adventure life at levels he had not understood when his adventure began. The artifical "return" to St. Petersburg that Tom brings to the story creates a situation where Huck is not the same Huck he was at the beginning of the story and realizes he can't go back.

 

Our students are like Huck, they too are transitioning from their limited understandings of the world around them through their daily experiences. This is particularly true of our teenaged students who are essentially in the process of coming out of the cocoon of childhood, just beginning to see the world around them with a new clarity. 

 

The voices in the books we assign do change over time per this article's thesis, however, in another sense so do our students' levels of receptiveness to the distance between the contemporary and the past. 

 

As they read more and more that pushes their literary appreciation they become more appreciative of books they had previously found uninteresting. 

 

In this sense, it might be good to consider that no student reads the same book twice even though they often read the same book twice. Because not only do the voices in the books change over time, but so do our students' abilities to "listen" to those voices.

 

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

 


Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Gunnar Sewell from Racines de l'Art
Scoop.it!

13 janvier 1898 - J'accuse

13 janvier 1898 - J'accuse | Education | Scoop.it
13 janvier 1898 : J'accuse - L\'écrivain Emile Zola relance l\'affaire Dreyfus et prend le risque de se faire inculper.

Via Ain Généalogie
more...
Ain Généalogie's curator insight, January 12, 2013 3:37 AM

L'émotion provoquée par l'Affaire concourt à la formation d'un bloc républicain et relance le principe d'une laïcisation complète de l'État, en latence depuis l'époque de Jules Ferry, vingt ans plus tôt. C'est ainsi que la loi de séparation des Églises et de l'État est enfin votée après d'ardents débats le 5 décembre 1905.

Rescooped by Gunnar Sewell from POURQUOI PAS... EN FRANÇAIS ?
Scoop.it!

Marcel Pagnol : 120 ans, et pas une ride

Marcel Pagnol : 120 ans, et pas une ride | Education | Scoop.it
Pour commémorer les 120 ans de la naissance de l'écrivain, le Figaro Hors-Série publie un numéro exceptionnel, entre album souvenir, portrait ensoleillé, profil d'une œuvre généreuse, au charme éternel.

Via Elena Pérez
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Gunnar Sewell from POURQUOI PAS... EN FRANÇAIS ?
Scoop.it!

Utile pour travailler le DELF B2 - Insuf-FLE...

Utile pour travailler le DELF B2 - Insuf-FLE... | Education | Scoop.it
Rien de tel que du matériel pédagogique bien ciblé pour aider nos apprenants à se préparer aux épreuves du DELF B2. Commençons plutôt par...

Via Elena Pérez
Gunnar Sewell's insight:

ressources pour vous préparer pour le DELF B2

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Gunnar Sewell from Metaglossia: The Translation World
Scoop.it!

Tout Frédéric Dard, l'auteur de "San Antonio", dans un dico

Tout Frédéric Dard, l'auteur de "San Antonio", dans un dico | Education | Scoop.it
REPLAY - Les éditions Fleuve sortent le premier dictionnaire qui recense expressions et définitions de Frédéric Dard. L'humour et la plume de l'auteur des aventures de San Antonio et Bérurier sont mis à l'honneur dans cet ouvrage.

La page de l'émission : Laissez-vous tenter

Frédéric Dard, l'auteur de "San Antonio" sort son dico
Crédit Image : STAFF / UPI / AFP
PAR BERNARD LEHUT , ELIA DAHAN PUBLIÉ LE 14/04/2015 À 09:52
12
Partages
Le DicoDard publié chez Fleuve Editions, est un impressionnant et réjouissant florilège du style incomparable de Frédéric Dard, qui aimait répéter qu'il avait fait sa carrière avec un vocabulaire de 300 mots et qu'il avait inventé tous les autres ! On retrouve dans ce dictionnaire ses mots créés de toutes pièces, sa truculence parfois sa grivoiserie mais aussi son regard singulier, amusé ou cruel, sur ses contemporains.

Quelques-unes des 3000 citations recensées dans le DicoDard de A à Z illustrent parfaitement l'impertinence de leur auteur. "A" comme affligeant : "Le bonheur d'un con fait toujours peine à voir". "A" comme amusant : "Il était aussi amusant qu'un gravier dans une godasse". Calembour, à l'entrée du mot "affabilité" : "La Fontaine était un homme affable".

Le terme "misogynie" de Frédéric Dard alias San Antonio est joyeusement assumé : "La bonne affaire consisterait à acheter les femmes au prix qu'elles valent et les revendre au prix qu'elle s'estiment". Une autre à la lettre "B" comme "baise-main" : "Le baise-main est un bon début, ça permet de renifler la qualité de la viande".

Erik Orsenna signe la préface

Frédéric Dard sait également se faire philosophe : "Les vrais battants ne sont pas ceux qui savent triompher mais ceux qui savent échouer." On trouve, dans le livre, plusieurs citations sur son travail d'écrivain dont celle-ci : "Les grands écrivains écrivent en noir. Moi, je n'écris qu'en couleurs, ça doit être pour ça qu'on me lit".

L'académicien, Erik Orsenna ne dit pas autre chose dans le superbe texte qu'il signe en préface du DicoDard : "Voilà pourquoi nous aimons tant Frédéric Dard, nous les amoureux de la langue française, il l'a fait roucouler comme personne". L'académicien signe la préface du DicoDard, 3000 citations réunies par Pierre Chalmin aux éditions Fleuve. Pour la route, un dernier passage assez amusant : "Le corbeau croasse, la grenouille coasse et le serbo-croate..."

Via Charles Tiayon
Gunnar Sewell's insight:

écrivain de romans policiers (dont le nom de plume est San Antonio)

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Gunnar Sewell from Writers & Books
Scoop.it!

Victor Hugo’s Drawings

Victor Hugo’s Drawings | Education | Scoop.it

In addition to his novels, poems, and plays, Hugo produced some four thousand drawings. See a few of them here.


Via bobbygw
Gunnar Sewell's insight:

Drawings by one of the greatest writers of the 19th century.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Gunnar Sewell from POURQUOI PAS... EN FRANÇAIS ?
Scoop.it!

Les prépositions avec les noms de pays

LES PAYS LES PRÉPOSITIONS AVEC LES NOMS DES PAYS

Via Elena Pérez
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Gunnar Sewell from Actualités du site du CRAP-Cahiers pédagogiques
Scoop.it!

Unesco - Éducation pour tous 2000-2015 : le bilan - Les Cahiers pédagogiques

Unesco - Éducation pour tous 2000-2015 : le bilan - Les Cahiers pédagogiques | Education | Scoop.it
En 2000, 164 gouvernements réunis au Forum mondial sur l’éducation de Dakar ont adopté le Cadre d’action pour l’Éducation pour tous qui visait à atteindre six vastes objectifs pour l’éducation d’ici à 2015. Quinze ans plus tard, le bilan.

Via CRAP-Cahiers pédagogiques
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Gunnar Sewell from French language and French speaking countries
Scoop.it!

Top 10 des mots et expressions « d’jeuns » enfin expliqués (aux vieux)

Top 10 des mots et expressions « d’jeuns » enfin expliqués (aux vieux) | Education | Scoop.it

“ Vous utilisez ces mots et expressions très souvent, mais en connaissez-vous véritablement l'origine ? Non ? Alors c'est parti pour un petit précis d'étymologie ! Swag Le terme swag ou swagg vient à”


Via Elena Pérez, Jeannine Lehr, Virginie Salin
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Gunnar Sewell from Canadian literature
Scoop.it!

The 20 books you'll be reading – and talking about – for the rest of the year - The Globe and Mail

The 20 books you'll be reading – and talking about – for the rest of the year - The Globe and Mail | Education | Scoop.it
Books Editor Mark Medley previews the 20 most anticipated books of the last six months of 2015

Via Fred Stenson
Gunnar Sewell's insight:

lecture d'été

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Gunnar Sewell from POURQUOI PAS... EN FRANÇAIS ?
Scoop.it!

B1 Subjonctif

Le Subjonctif - II Infinitif / Indicatif / Subjonctif ?  Les emplois du subjonctif

Via Elena Pérez
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Gunnar Sewell from The France News Net - Latest stories
Scoop.it!

From Left Bank to left behind: where have the great French thinkers gone?

From Left Bank to left behind: where have the great French thinkers gone? | Education | Scoop.it
Writing shortly after the end of the second world war, the French historian André Siegfried claimed (with a characteristic touch of Gallic aplomb) that French thought had been the driving force behind all the major advances of human civilisation, before concluding that “wherever she goes, France introduces clarity, intellectual ease, curiosity, and ... a subtle and necessary form of wisdom”. This ideal of a global French rayonnement (a combination of expansive impact and benevolent radiance) is now a distant and nostalgic memory.

French thought is in the doldrums. French philosophy, which taught the world to reason with sweeping and bold systems such as rationalism, republicanism, feminism, positivism, existentialism and structuralism, has had conspicuously little to offer in recent decades. Saint-Germain-des-Prés, once the engine room of the Parisian Left Bank’s intellectual creativity, has become a haven of high-fashion boutiques, with fading memories of its past artistic and literary glory. As a disillusioned writer from the neighbourhood noted grimly: “The time will soon come when we will be reduced to selling little statues of Sartre made in China.” French literature, with its once glittering cast of authors, from Balzac and George Sand to Jules Verne, Albert Camus and Marguerite Yourcenar, has likewise lost much of its global appeal – a loss barely concealed by recent awards of the Nobel prize for literature to JMG Le Clézio and Patrick Modiano. In 2012, the Magazine Littéraire sounded the alarm with an apocalyptic headline: “La France pense-t-elle encore?” (“Does France still think?”)

Via French-News-Online.com
more...
French-News-Online.com's curator insight, June 14, 4:16 AM

In the Race for Ideas: are French and European Philosophers Falling Behind?

Read more: http://www.french-news-online.com/wordpress/?p=39916

Rescooped by Gunnar Sewell from Writers & Books
Scoop.it!

Classic French Fiction: Emile Zola's 'Thérèse Raquin' and 'La Bête Humaine'

Classic French Fiction: Emile Zola's 'Thérèse Raquin' and 'La Bête Humaine' | Education | Scoop.it

Two lovers who can't keep their hands off each other's bodies and who have sex on the floor; an inconvenient and unattractive husband who it is necessary to get out of the way.


Via bobbygw
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Gunnar Sewell from La Gazette Gourmande
Scoop.it!

Aux champs - Guy de Maupassant (extrait, avec du pot-au-feu dedans)

Aux champs - Guy de Maupassant (extrait, avec du pot-au-feu dedans) | Education | Scoop.it

La première des deux demeures, en venant de la station d'eaux de Rolleport, était occupée par les Tuvache, qui avaient trois filles et un garçon ; l'autre masure abritait les Vallin, qui avaient une fille et trois garçons.
Tout cela vivait péniblement de soupe, de pomme de terre et de grand air. A sept heures, le matin, puis à midi, puis à six heures, le soir, les ménagères réunissaient leurs mioches pour donner la pâtée, comme des gardeurs d'oies assemblent leurs bêtes. Les enfants étaient assis, par rang d'âge, devant la table en bois, vernie par cinquante ans d'usage. Le dernier moutard avait à peine la bouche au niveau de la planche. On posait devant eux l'assiette creuse pleine de pain molli dans l'eau où avaient cuit les pommes de terre, un demi-chou et trois oignons ; et toute la lignée mangeait jusqu'à plus faim. La mère empâtait elle-même le petit. Un peu de viande au pot-au-feu, le dimanche, était une fête pour tous, et le père, ce jour-là, s'attardait au repas en répétant : "Je m'y ferais bien tous les jours".
Aux champs - Guy de Maupassant


Via La Gazette Gourmande - Tribunes
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Gunnar Sewell from Metaglossia: The Translation World
Scoop.it!

Biographie de Gustave Flaubert, citations de l'auteur du Madame Bovary et Salammbo

Biographie de Gustave Flaubert, citations de l'auteur du Madame Bovary et Salammbo | Education | Scoop.it
Romancier français. Fils du chirurgien en chef de l'hôpital de Rouen, Gustave Flaubert se sent délaissé par rapport à son frère et se tourne très tôt vers la littérature. Sa rencontre, à l'âge de quinze ans, avec Elisabeth Schlésinger, femme mariée, marque le début d'une passion impossible qu'il évoquera notamment dans l'"Education sentimentale". Contraint par son père de suivre des études de droit, il est obligé de les interrompre après avoir été victime en 1844 d'une très violente crise nerveuse et peut enfin se tourner vers le seul métier qu'il conçoit, celui d'écrivain. Gustave Flaubert s'installe alors à la campagne pour écrire ses oeuvres longuement préparées. Il entreprend alors plusieurs voyages à l'étranger (Italie, Egypte, Turquie, Algérie, Tunisie).

Son roman "Madame Bovary" (1857) ayant scandalisé les milieux bourgeois lui vaut un procès pour "atteinte aux bonnes moeurs et à la religion" dont il sort acquitté. Comme souvent dans ces cas-là, cette affaire contribue au succès de l’ouvrage. Après la publication de "Salammbô" (1862), il fréquente les écrivains célèbres de Paris, Les Goncourt, Sainte-Beuve, Théophile Gauthier, George Sand... La critique de "L'Education sentimentale", ouvrage auquel il a consacré sept ans et qu'il publie en 1869, est très mauvaise, malgré le soutien de Zola et de George Sand. Il en est de même pour la version définitive de "La Tentation de Saint Antoine". Mais Gustave Flaubert ne recherche pas la célébrité : "Je vise à mieux, dit-il à son ami Maxime Du Camp, à me plaire, et c'est plus difficile." Epuisé, dépité de tout et harcelé par les difficultés financières, il meurt subitement d'une hémorragie cérébrale, avant d'avoir pu achever "Bouvard et Pécuchet".

D'un point de vue littéraire, Gustave Flaubert est un auteur profondément pessimiste qui se situe à la charnière du romantisme et du réalisme. A la recherche de la vérité sous les apparences, il décrit, tel un médecin, la réalité avec la plus grande objectivité et une précision scrupuleuse, presque scientifique. Obsédé par le style, il rature et réécrit sans cesse ses textes. Outre ses principaux et rares romans (trois plus un inachevé), il échange avec ses amis, ainsi qu'avec Louise Colet qui fut sa maîtresse pendant une dizaine d'années, une impressionnante correspondance. Elle constitue en elle-même un véritable chef d'oeuvre qui permet de connaître réellement celui qui considérait que l'écrivain doit rester absent de son oeuvre. Guy de Maupassant, Zola et Daudet le considèrent comme leur maître, laissant présager de la place de plus en plus importante qu'il va prendre après sa mort dans la littérature française en tant que chef de file de l'école réaliste.

Gustave Flaubert introduit la religion dans ses romans comme un des éléments constitutifs de la société méritant un examen satirique dans son analyse du ridicule, des abus et des préjugés de son époque. Opposé aux dogmes et aux idôles, libre penseur, voire anticlérical, il n'apparaît cependant pas complètement hostile à la religion dans laquelle il voit un facteur d'ordre.
Via Charles Tiayon
more...
Charles Tiayon's curator insight, March 11, 2014 8:46 PM
Romancier français. Fils du chirurgien en chef de l'hôpital de Rouen, Gustave Flaubert se sent délaissé par rapport à son frère et se tourne très tôt vers la littérature. Sa rencontre, à l'âge de quinze ans, avec Elisabeth Schlésinger, femme mariée, marque le début d'une passion impossible qu'il évoquera notamment dans l'"Education sentimentale". Contraint par son père de suivre des études de droit, il est obligé de les interrompre après avoir été victime en 1844 d'une très violente crise nerveuse et peut enfin se tourner vers le seul métier qu'il conçoit, celui d'écrivain. Gustave Flaubert s'installe alors à la campagne pour écrire ses oeuvres longuement préparées. Il entreprend alors plusieurs voyages à l'étranger (Italie, Egypte, Turquie, Algérie, Tunisie).

Son roman "Madame Bovary" (1857) ayant scandalisé les milieux bourgeois lui vaut un procès pour "atteinte aux bonnes moeurs et à la religion" dont il sort acquitté. Comme souvent dans ces cas-là, cette affaire contribue au succès de l’ouvrage. Après la publication de "Salammbô" (1862), il fréquente les écrivains célèbres de Paris, Les Goncourt, Sainte-Beuve, Théophile Gauthier, George Sand... La critique de "L'Education sentimentale", ouvrage auquel il a consacré sept ans et qu'il publie en 1869, est très mauvaise, malgré le soutien de Zola et de George Sand. Il en est de même pour la version définitive de "La Tentation de Saint Antoine". Mais Gustave Flaubert ne recherche pas la célébrité : "Je vise à mieux, dit-il à son ami Maxime Du Camp, à me plaire, et c'est plus difficile." Epuisé, dépité de tout et harcelé par les difficultés financières, il meurt subitement d'une hémorragie cérébrale, avant d'avoir pu achever "Bouvard et Pécuchet".

D'un point de vue littéraire, Gustave Flaubert est un auteur profondément pessimiste qui se situe à la charnière du romantisme et du réalisme. A la recherche de la vérité sous les apparences, il décrit, tel un médecin, la réalité avec la plus grande objectivité et une précision scrupuleuse, presque scientifique. Obsédé par le style, il rature et réécrit sans cesse ses textes. Outre ses principaux et rares romans (trois plus un inachevé), il échange avec ses amis, ainsi qu'avec Louise Colet qui fut sa maîtresse pendant une dizaine d'années, une impressionnante correspondance. Elle constitue en elle-même un véritable chef d'oeuvre qui permet de connaître réellement celui qui considérait que l'écrivain doit rester absent de son oeuvre. Guy de Maupassant, Zola et Daudet le considèrent comme leur maître, laissant présager de la place de plus en plus importante qu'il va prendre après sa mort dans la littérature française en tant que chef de file de l'école réaliste.

Gustave Flaubert introduit la religion dans ses romans comme un des éléments constitutifs de la société méritant un examen satirique dans son analyse du ridicule, des abus et des préjugés de son époque. Opposé aux dogmes et aux idôles, libre penseur, voire anticlérical, il n'apparaît cependant pas complètement hostile à la religion dans laquelle il voit un facteur d'ordre.
Rescooped by Gunnar Sewell from POURQUOI PAS... EN FRANÇAIS ?
Scoop.it!

27 livres pour un été

27 livres pour un été | Education | Scoop.it

quelque La bio de John Belushi, un émouvant document romancé de Didier Daeninckx, un récit édifiant de Jean-Christophe Rufin... Voici un bon choix de...


Via Elena Pérez
Gunnar Sewell's insight:

Quelques livres à lire pendant les vacances d'été

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Gunnar Sewell from (Media & Trend)
Scoop.it!

De quoi le bouton “like” de Facebook est-il le nom ?

De quoi le bouton “like” de Facebook est-il le nom ? | Education | Scoop.it
C'est un petit clic anodin en apparence, mais qui revêt pourtant de multiples significations. Pourquoi a-t-on besoin de signifier à son ami Facebook qu'on “like” son statut ou l'article qu'il a posté ?

 

A l'ère du partage tous azimuts, le bouton « like » (ou « j'aime », en français) deFacebook n'est plus seulement cet incontournable thermomètre de popularité qu'il fut naguère, quand Mark Zuckerberg avait encore de l'acné. Aujourd'hui, le « like » est une denrée qui s'échange et recouvre mille significations. Tel un écureuil caché dans les cheveux du prince Harry, derrière chaque « like » se dissimule une arrière-pensée plus ou moins consciente, une stratégie, un sourire, un rictus, une grimace, un clin d'œil. Petite typologie non exhaustive des « like ».

Le « like » américain
C'est le « like » le plus courant, le « like » primaire, enthousiaste, pouce en l'air, œil torve et sourire bovin, sans malice, sans sorcellerie. Un statut crétin sur la mort de Jean-Luc Delarue (« Snif, Jean-Luc est parti. ») ou une photo d'un ami qui vomit, et on clique. On réfléchira après.

Le « like » des amitiés défuntes
On n'a pas vu Jean-Ernest depuis très longtemps, on n'a pas vraiment su quoi penser du lien qu'il a mis en ligne, une pub pour un rouleau de cuisine de la marque Iglezias, on ne saura jamais ce qu'on en pense vraiment, on a juste envie de prévenir Jean-Ernest qu'on l'aime bien encore, malgré tout, même si le temps, sa femme, ses orientations politiques, son chien et les années nous ont éloigné, même si on ne partage plus grand chose, à part le PSG et des connexions parfois simultanées sur le réseau, mais on n'a pas le courage d'engager une conversation, alors on « like », on « like » pour retarder le moment où l'on aura même pas la force de se dire adieu.

Le « like » urticant
Typiquement, le « like » de retour de soirée. Les bulles de champagne n'ont pas fini d'éclater de joie dans nos artères et on a hyper envie d'aimer le monde entier sauf qu'on est tout seul dans le canapé sous la lumière blafarde de l'ordinateur portable. Alors on « like » sans mesure le statut vaguement raciste du beau-frère, des photos de chiots, la nouvelle photo de profil du chef de service, on like comme on se gratte, pour soulager une démangeaison, on « aime » pour ne pas avoir à constater qu'on est seul dans le canapé.

Le « like » du dragueur
On a rencontré une fille en soirée. On n'a pas son 06, mais on a son prénom, Léa, mais à cause du whisky, seulement un bout de son nom de famille. Ça finit par « oir ». On recherche sur Google les noms de famille qui finissent par « oir », ça prend du temps, et on finit par trouver, mais oui, foutu whisky, c'était Lenoir ! Hop, trente-neuf Léa Lenoir sur Facebook, on fouille, on stalke, là voilà, cachée sous une photo de panda roux dans la neige (ça veut dire qu'elle est sensible et romantique), elle n'a pas verrouillé l'accès à ses photos de profil (ça veut dire qu'elle est moins maligne que prévu), on remonte le temps pour bien marquer le coup et voilà une chouette photo d'elle à moitié nue sur la plage du Touquet qui date de 2009 (ça veut dire qu'elle est moins timide qu'hier soir), elle sourit, elle est jolie malgré sa bouche en cul de poule et ce Kevin Forever tatoué sur l'épaule (ça veut dire qu'elle n'est pas bilingue en anglais), alors on appuie sur la gâchette, un bon gros like de séducteur du dimanche sur une photo qu'elle avait elle-même oubliée, on attend la réponse, sûr de son petit effet. Elle ne tarde pas : « VAZY LACHES MOI JTE CONAI PA ». C'était peut-être pas Lenoir en fait.

Le « like » Tulius Detritus
Non, jeune étourneau tombé de la dernière averse, le « like » n'est pas toujours gratuit et désintéressé. Par exemple, si Amélie « like » tous vos statuts depuis deux semaines, ce n'est pas qu'elle est tombée amoureuse de vos traits d'esprit. C'est juste que vous lui avez promis de lui prêter les cinq saisons de The Wire en VOST. Mais il est des « like » plus hypocrites et calculateurs. Parmi ces « like » faux-cul, trône le « like » corporate, brosse à reluire qui viendra astiquer l'ego du supérieur hiérarchique ou du collègue que vous avez accepté sur Facebook un soir d'excès. Le principe est simple : dès que le chef tousse sur Facebook, vous « likez ». « Beau temps sur l'Île d'Yeu. » LIKE. « Ce soir, tartiflette maison ! » LIKE. « Mes nouvelles pantoufles » LIKE. « Ma fille a une sclérose en plaque ». LIKE. Tel est pris qui croyait prendre par là où il a pêché.

Le « like » d'anniversaire
C'est un « like » qui veut dire simplement merci. Il doit être apposé au bas de chacun des messages que vos amis auront eu la gentillesse de déposer sur votre mur pour vous rappeler qu'il vous reste beaucoup moins de temps à vivre que l'année dernière. Un « like » pénible (il faut « liker » cinquante fois de suite la même phrase) qui fonctionne comme un onguent social, un peu de Nivea sur les croûtes de l'amitié.

L'équilibre de la terreur des « like »
Vous étiez malade, votre doigt a ripé pendant que vous renifliez, et paf, voilà, vous venez de « liker » le dernier statut d'un inconnu qui s'est incrusté un jour de faiblesse dans la liste de vos amis. Le statut en question ne vaut pas tripettes (« Y'a-t-il des hommes pour guider les chiens aveugles ? »). Dix minutes plus tard, voilà que l'inconnu « like » à son tour votre dernier statut, pas vraiment brillant non plus.(« Aux jeux paralympiques, deux schizophrènes par équipe suffisent pour courir le quatre fois cent mètres »). Voilà un exemple concret de l'équilibre des « like », tabou des réseaux, mais qui permet au système de fonctionner. Chacun sait qu'il ne mérite pas le « like » de l'autre, mais ce n'est pas grave, ce petit échange de bons procédés restera un non dit entre vous, comme un échange de bisous invisibles entre deux gamins dans une cour de récréation.

L'« auto-like »
Le « like » le moins compris sur les réseaux et souvent pris à tort pour une marque de suffisance ou d'auto-satisfaction. Les personnes qui s'« auto-likent » n'ont simplement pas assimilé les règles de bienséance du réseau qui consistent à s'échanger les « like » sans jamais se servir tout seul dans le pot de confiture. Ils sont un peu plus lents que les autres et ce n'est pas une raison pour leur jeter la pierre.

Le faux « like »
En fait, c'est un « unlike », mais Facebook n'a pas eu l'idée de proposer cette option. Il vient souvent s'inscrire au bas d'un lien vers un article plus ou moins dramatique ou sérieux, (« La vérité sur les baleines qui s'échouent ») et généralement, le « likeur »a peur d'être mal compris et s'empresse d'amender son « like » d'un commentaire : « En fait, je n'aime pas ! ». Les Norvégiens et Japonais « likeront » l'article au premier degré. 

Le « like » d'ironie
Chaque fois qu'il vous arrive un pépin et que vous le racontez sur Facebook (grippe, contravention, opération des dents de sagesse...), Jean-Bernard « like » votre statut. Au départ, vous avez pris ces « like » pour des marques de soutien, et puis, en y réfléchissant, vous vous êtes rappelé qu'à l'école primaire, Jean-Bernard était un peu votre tête de Turc. Vous aviez oublié. Pas lui. 

Le « like » de bobo
Jean-Olivier aime des marques de fringues inconnues, des groupes de rock qui ne sont pas encore formés et fréquente des bars tellement underground qu'ils ont été raccordés aux réseaux sociaux avant d'être raccordés au réseau d'eau potable. Régulièrement, Jean-Olivier écrit des statuts cryptés dans lesquels il vante les charmes de ces lieux interlopes, de ces dernières tendances dont personne n'a jamais entendu parler. Vous « likez » ses statuts comme beaucoup d'autres, sur le mode, « on a les mêmes goûts Jean-Olivier et moi », même si vous êtes incapables de faire la différence entre un hipster et un Amish.

Le « like » parental
Vous venez de faire un jeu de mots pour tenter de séduire les quinze amies Facebook dont vous êtes un peu amoureux quand soudain une notification vient vous éblouir comme un lapin dans les phares d'une voiture. Votre mère vient de « liker » votre jeu de mots. Votre génitrice vous envoie un message clair : « Je t'ai à l'œil sale gosse ». Allez sur Twitter. 

Le « like » du feignant
Un « like » plutôt qu'une longue discussion. Sous un statut, soudain, un commentaire vous hèle. Pour ne pas avoir à y répondre, vous le « likez » et retournez à vos occupations. Ce « like » équivaut à un « oui, oui, haha, wesh, bien vu, mais brisons-là » dans une conversation courante de Victor Hugo.

Le « like » politique
Il y a toujours des amis qui publient des informations sur tel conflit, telle situation politique ou économique. Pour ne pas passer seulement pour un guignol, vous les « likez » régulièrement en fronçant le sourcil, sûr que ces « like » prouveront à tous que vous êtes concerné par l'état de la planète, que vous êtes un type sérieux, même si deux minutes après avoir « liké » un lien sur la fonte irrémédiable de la calotte glacière, vous racontez en statut cette blague qui ruine probablement votre stratégie : « C'est l'histoire d'un pingouin qui respire par le cul. Un jour, il s'assoit et il meurt. »

Le « like » d'encouragement
Personne ne « like » jamais les statuts de Jean-Simon. Il faut dire que Jean-Simon a un public restreint (douze amis dont vous-même, par erreur, un soir où vous l'avez rencontré au Mondial de l'automobile au cours d'un reportage sur le salon de l'agriculture – vous vous étiez trompé dans les dates) et qu'il n'écrit jamais que des statuts relatifs aux nouveautés du marché automobile. Un jour, Jean-Simon, qui n'a pas son permis, poste une photo de Sophie Favier alanguie sur le capot d'une Renault Scenic électrique et « like » aussitôt son propre lien en commentant : « Je me suis “auto-liké”. » Après réflexion, vous « likez ».

Le « like » pur
C'est le seul « like » sans arrière-pensée, un « like » pétri d'amour et d'eau fraîche, qui ne se démontre ni ne se justifie. Le « like » a ses raisons que la raison ne connaît pas.


Via Virginie Colnel
Gunnar Sewell's insight:

Que veut dire "like" de fessesbook?

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Gunnar Sewell from POURQUOI PAS... EN FRANÇAIS ?
Scoop.it!

GABFLE: JEU DE VOCABULAIRE (Les jours fériés / niveaux A1-A2) :

GABFLE: JEU DE VOCABULAIRE (Les jours fériés / niveaux A1-A2) : | Education | Scoop.it

Un « jour férié » est un jour de fête où on ne travaille pas quand c’est un jour de la semaine ou le samedi. En France, il y a11 jours fériés communs à tout le territoire français. Mais comment s’appellent-ils et pourquoi ces jours sont-ils fériés ? Devinez-le avec ce jeu de vocabulaire / civilisation !


Via Elena Pérez
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Gunnar Sewell from POURQUOI PAS... EN FRANÇAIS ?
Scoop.it!

Le masculin et le féminin des professions

Le masculin et le féminin des professions | Education | Scoop.it
Voir l’article pour en savoir plus.

Via Elena Pérez
more...
Golodniuc Georgiana's curator insight, May 30, 4:23 PM

Une ressource pédagogique publié sur un site wordpress. Je peux dire que la vidéo sur "Le masculin et le féminin des professions/ métier est destiné à un public de niveau A2-B1. On entend une personne qui parle en français, donc il s'agit de la compréhension orale. On s'appuie sur des images pour présenter le sujet proposé. Le présentateur offre sur des explications en donnant des règles sur la formation du féminin.

 

Les objectifs pédagogique: apprendre les règles du masculin et du féminin des professions.

 

Théorie de l'apprentissage de cette ressource : elle relève de l'approche transmissive.

L'enseignant a crée une vidéo afin de transmettre les règles du masculin et du féminin des métiers.

 

Médias et interactivité: Vidéo Youtube posté sur un site Wordpress.

 Il n'y a pas d'interactivité entre l'enseignant et l'apprenant, car ce dernier doit seulement écouter et prendre des notes pour apprendre.

On peut considérer cette ressource numérique comme un appui dans une classe hybride. Après avoir suivi la vidéo à la maison, l'apprenant peut poser des questions à l'enseignant en classe et lui partager ses craintes ou incompréhensions en visionnant cette vidéo.