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What’s the point of education if Google can tell us anything?

What’s the point of education if Google can tell us anything? | Education | Scoop.it

Such debate about the place and purpose of online searching in learning and assessments is not new. But rather than thinking of ways to prevent students from cheating or plagiarising in their assessed pieces of work, maybe our obsession with the “authenticity” of their coursework or assessment is missing another important educational point.

Emerson Mistico's insight:

Interesting read about the nature of knowledge and learning.

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DebbyBruck's comment, August 18, 2015 3:29 AM
This is so right on - thank you. Educating one's self online is empowering only if the user understands the difference between "crap collection" and that which is meaningful and useable at the time of curation. Curation only has value when we use the information in the moment as a motivator and inspiration to carry on in bettering ourselves in the here and now. This is my idea of content curation and educating on what speaks to our hearts in the very NOW moment.
DebbyBruck's curator insight, August 18, 2015 4:23 AM

Online searching/learning has a definite and substantial impact in our world today. Just remember to use regularly what you are saving (or curating), and to balance it all with real world experience.  Visit your elders, your neighbors, your parents, your community, your friends (and listen to their stories): in many cases they were alive many decades before you were.  They saw wars, political changes, social movements, etc., that can never be described in the same way online than from first hand experience.  Honor these people by your presence AND learn all you can online. Temper all of it by having one foot in the world of FREE information and one foot in the world of first-hand contact with those who lived those times. The cool thing about attending a school (in person) is you get the best of both worlds - interaction with others and your time online.

Reshmi_Insomreadniac's curator insight, September 16, 2015 9:04 AM

//In an era of informational abundance, educational end-products – the exam or piece of coursework – need to become less about a single student creating an “authentic” text, and more about a certain kind of digital literacy which harnesses the wisdom of the network of information that is available at the click of a button.//

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Why Some Schools Are Selling All Their iPads

Why Some Schools Are Selling All Their iPads | Education | Scoop.it
Four years after Apple introduced its popular tablet, many districts are switching to laptops.

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Elaine J Roberts, Ph.D.'s curator insight, October 6, 2014 8:13 AM

There's a lot of great things about iPads, but clearly there are and have been some disadvantages. (Cough: USB port) Administrators and teachers asking the question "How can we get this right?" is powerfully important. Let's go digital, but let's do so in a way that empowers kids.


Carlos Rodrigues Cadre's curator insight, October 6, 2014 10:04 AM

adicionar a sua visão ...

David W. Deeds's curator insight, October 6, 2014 5:42 PM

Oh, boy...the Apple fanatics are gonna hate this post. ;)

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How to Minimize Digital Classroom Distractions

How to Minimize Digital Classroom Distractions | Education | Scoop.it

As pointed out by Tom Daccord on Edudemic, when “the activity is engaging and challenging, there is an authentic audience, and prescribed time limits, students won’t mess around.” Design your lessons by ensuring that the length and intensity of your discussion are appropriate to the range of your students’ attention spans.

 

 


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Nik Peachey's curator insight, August 28, 2014 4:53 AM

Yes. The best way to stop distraction is to keep students busy and engaged in meaningful activities.

Jean-Francois Provencher's curator insight, August 29, 2014 1:43 AM

Great article

Ness Crouch's curator insight, August 29, 2014 7:55 PM

Very important tips! 

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The Neuroscience Behind Stress and Learning

The Neuroscience Behind Stress and Learning | Education | Scoop.it
The highest-level executive thinking, making connections, and "aha" moments of insight and creative innovation are more likely to occur in an atmosphere of what Alfie Kohn calls exuberant discovery, where students of all ages retain that kindergarten enthusiasm of embracing each day with the joy of learning.
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Pamela D Lloyd's curator insight, October 31, 2014 4:19 PM

While stress may be useful for learning not to touch a hot stove, it tends to inhibit the kind of learning that is most needed by students in today's world.

Josefina Santos's curator insight, November 25, 2014 12:09 AM

Amazing

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Gamification vs. Game based learning vs. Game design

Gamification vs. Game based learning vs. Game design | Education | Scoop.it
It is well documented how using games in a classroom context can facilitate collaborative learning, promote problem solving and stimulate an engaging learning environment. Three philosophies which...

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David W. Deeds's curator insight, June 20, 2014 8:54 AM

All kinds of good games stuff today! 

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The 8 Digital Skills Students Need for The Future

The 8 Digital Skills Students Need for The Future | Education | Scoop.it
The 8 Digital Skills Students Need for The Future ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning on Google Trips curated by Brandi McWilliams (Writing tops the list.

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David W. Deeds's curator insight, June 5, 2014 10:24 AM

Note that "judging the quality of information" tops the list.

Julie Lindsay's curator insight, June 6, 2014 10:24 PM

Seems like a reasonable list....

Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, July 22, 2014 9:49 PM

Great Chart! Gets to the point quick!

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Over 800 Free MOOCs to Help you Grow Professionally

Over 800 Free MOOCs to Help you Grow Professionally | Education | Scoop.it
“ Over 800 Free MOOCs to Help you Grow Professionally This Summer ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning on E-Learning-Inclusivo (Mashup) curated by juandoming (See it on Scoop.it, via E-Learning-Inclusivo (Mashup) ”
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David W. Deeds's curator insight, May 28, 2014 12:27 PM

Just in case you don´t already have a fully-booked summer. ;)

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"Instructional Designer" vs. "Learning Designer"

"Instructional Designer" vs. "Learning Designer" | Education | Scoop.it
EduWire.com curates critical news and trends in the higher education technology arena.

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David W. Deeds's curator insight, May 24, 2014 9:25 AM

You say toh-may-toh, I say toh-mah-toh... ;)

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Infographic: The Gamification of Education

Infographic: The Gamification of Education | Education | Scoop.it
Gamification has tremendous potential in the education space. How can we use it to deliver truly meaningful experiences to students? Let us know what you think in the comments.

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Blackboard and Grupo Positivo Partner to Strengthen e-Learning in Brazil | eTraining Pedia

Blackboard and Grupo Positivo Partner to Strengthen e-Learning in Brazil | eTraining Pedia | Education | Scoop.it
“ Blackboard, a global leader in technology solutions for the education industry, and Positivo Informatica (IT), Universidade Positivo (University) and Editora”
Via Justin Menard
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5 Key Barriers to Educational Technology Adoption in the Developing World

“ Educational technology will continue to be implemented incrementally in many parts of the developing world.”
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Re-engineering Academic Libraries for Digital Natives and Beyond

The slides are from the 2011 ACRL e-learning webcast that focused on the capability of digital learning materials (i.e. interactive learning objects, open educa

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Learning Theory - What are the established learning theories?

Learning Theory - What are the established learning theories? | Education | Scoop.it
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Alice Maria Costa's curator insight, April 20, 2014 11:22 AM

Teorias de Aprendizagem ea Aprendizagem AMBIENTES EM do Século XXI

Thomas Salmon's curator insight, April 29, 2014 3:09 PM

Nice summary of many learning theories in one place!

Dean Mantz's curator insight, May 5, 2014 3:13 PM

This is truly one mindmap that takes sometime to comprehend. 

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Unesco lança biblioteca científica gratuita e multilíngue para estudantes

Unesco lança biblioteca científica gratuita e multilíngue para estudantes | Education | Scoop.it
A 'World Library of Science' já conta com 300 artigos, 25 e-books e mais de 70 vídeos cedidos pela revista Nature
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5 Important Web Tools Students Can Use to Create Educational Games

5 Important Web Tools Students Can Use to Create Educational Games | Education | Scoop.it

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Karen Bonanno's curator insight, October 5, 2014 4:55 PM

Game players and creators

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11 Great GOOGLE CLASSROOM Tutorials by Early Access Testers

11 Great GOOGLE CLASSROOM Tutorials by Early Access Testers | Education | Scoop.it

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David W. Deeds's curator insight, July 28, 2014 8:52 AM

Here we go. Can't wait to get this going at CAG. 

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The 6-step guide to flipping your classroom - Daily Genius

The 6-step guide to flipping your classroom - Daily Genius | Education | Scoop.it

The handy graphic below synthesizes the overwhelming to-do list of flipping your classroom into 6 easy steps that make the whole process a little less daunting


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Andrea Stewart's curator insight, July 27, 2014 12:12 AM

Helpful, though I don't quite follow the traditional flip.

Daniel Compton's curator insight, August 13, 2014 6:55 AM

Flipped classroom in a simple step-by-step chart

ManufacturingStories's curator insight, October 9, 2014 9:33 AM

For more resources on STEM Education visit http://bit.ly/1640Tbl

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21st Century Ed Tech Classroom

21st Century Ed Tech Classroom | Education | Scoop.it
See on Scoop.it - Digital Technologies for Teachers and Career Practitioners At the Components of a 21st Century Classroom Infographic you will learn about some of the key advancements in the 21st ...

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David W. Deeds's curator insight, June 15, 2014 10:08 AM

One more infographic today. ;)

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, June 15, 2014 1:45 PM

I always find it interesting that as much as change is supposed to be happening the School's structure is at least graphically presented as unchanging. Students are at desks which point toward the front of the room where the teacher is located. The students appear to be working alone although two are sitting together.

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What Game Based Learning Can Do for Student Achievement (EdSurge News)

What Game Based Learning Can Do for Student Achievement (EdSurge News) | Education | Scoop.it

Like its devotees, gaming has come a long way. And more than ever before, we understand that different students learn in different ways. Providing a multi-layered approach is essential for ensuring that everyone is learning.


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Nik Peachey's curator insight, June 1, 2014 3:44 AM

Good article with some good game suggestions.

Joe Pereira's curator insight, June 2, 2014 8:44 AM

A nice little article with a few good game suggestions to use in the classroom, although it is extremely disappointing not see any paser-based IF mentioned when they've included 'Gone Home' and 'Myst', described as a 'first-person puzzle game'. Both these games are a direct graphical evolution of the standard text adventure. One thing I don't like in the article though, is the author's decision to discuss both the topics of Digital Game-based learning and Gamification. I don't think Gamification should be discussed at all with educators, when real video games can be used for learning, instead of game-like concepts.

 

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Technology Is Changing How We Teach

Technology Is Changing How We Teach | Education | Scoop.it
Technology Is Changing How We Teach The Transylvania Times (Frances Bryant Bradburn, former Director of Instructional Technology at the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction, is currently working with schools and school systems interested...

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David W. Deeds's curator insight, May 27, 2014 9:46 AM

Good stuff! 

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, May 27, 2014 12:03 PM

And it should change how we teach. Using any tool should be the product of a mindful process which is well thought out and applied.

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10 ways Google Classroom will make learning better | Ditch That Textbook

10 ways Google Classroom will make learning better | Ditch That Textbook | Education | Scoop.it

I became a fan of Google Reader, which collected blog posts and other publications to RSS in one easy-to-access place. Then Google discarded this service — one that had a very loyal user base. Google has a history of doing this to features that don’t meet its needs anymore. If I’m making the switch to Classroom, I’d like to know that Google has committed to it.


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Rosemary Tyrrell, Ed.D.'s curator insight, May 20, 2014 12:10 PM

The author questions whether Google will continue to support its newly created LMS - Google Classroom. 

Sofie Kokelenberg's curator insight, May 21, 2014 6:02 AM

"Dog ate my homework" won't work with this, but what a promising option for blended learning :)

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Infographic: What Does It Take To Be A Teacher?

Infographic: What Does It Take To Be A Teacher? | Education | Scoop.it

What Does It Take To Be A Teacher? Infographic shows that teachers’ realities are growing increasingly complex.


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Jaime Salcedo Luna's curator insight, May 18, 2014 8:08 AM

Interesante comparación de la dedicación requerida para ser docente en cinco países del mundo.

Niki Davis's curator insight, May 19, 2014 6:16 AM

Looks too certain to me - there must be enormous difficulties in measuring this across cultures, contexts and other aspects of these rapidly evolving ecosystems. 

Heather Morrow Giles's curator insight, June 19, 2014 10:19 AM

this is why we go home so tired!

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Synergies between online learning, on-campus teaching and flexible learning

Synergies between online learning, on-campus teaching and flexible learning | Education | Scoop.it

Via Jesús Salinas, Pierre Levy
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Technology in Education is Classist

Technology in Education is Classist | Education | Scoop.it
“ A debate between Private School technology and Public School technology is actually a debate between Rich kids technology and Poor kids technology. Is it not? Rich isn't just about money, its also about the luxury of time and the human capacity to prioritize where to invest money and time to get the greatest return for…”
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, April 16, 2014 9:04 PM

I disagree that education is slightly classist. it is a lot classist. It is about replicating society and its existing status quo. Actually, it is not education that is classist, but school which is the institution an elite uses to keep an existing class system in tact. All this makes technology in schools exceptionally classist which goes a long way to explaining the people who trumpet technology as necessary in schools.

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The Creativity Cure - Faculty - The Chronicle of Higher Education

The Creativity Cure - Faculty - The Chronicle of Higher Education | Education | Scoop.it
A growing appreciation of the practical and societal value of creative thinking has prompted colleges to make it compulsory.

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Smithstorian's curator insight, April 2, 2013 11:32 AM

Einstein was blessed with a rare genius. He also understood the intellectual weight of a flight of fancy.

 

When he was 16, he wondered what would happen if he were to ride alongside a beam of light.

 

He turned over the idea in his mind for a decade before concluding that the light beam next to him would appear to be at rest even though it was traveling at the speed of light. Einstein's image eventually helped unlock one of the most-consequential theories in the history of science: his special theory of relativity.

 

It was not the force of his intellect that was most responsible for bringing the theory into existence, according to Walter Isaacson's 2007 biography of Einstein. "His success came not from the brute strength of his mental processing power," he wrote, "but from his imagination and creativity."

While it may be tempting to focus on Einstein's cognitive supremacy, it makes more sense, faculty at some colleges believe, to train students in how innovative thinkers like him use the tools of creativity to solve problems.

 

Today's students will need such tools to tackle the problems they stand to inherit. Climate change, income inequality, and escalating health-care costs cannot be remedied by technocratic solutions alone, say advocates of teaching creativity. Knowledge will need to be combined across disciplines, and juxtaposed in unorthodox ways.

 

Deans, provosts, and faculty members are also aware that many of their students will shift careers several times in their lives and work at jobs that do not exist yet. If students can gain some facility with creative thinking now, colleges reason, perhaps they will be more adaptable both as employees and citizens in an uncertain future. This growing appreciation of the practical, societal, and personal value of learning creative skills has prompted colleges both large and small to make creativity a compulsory part of their undergraduate education.

 

Starting this fall, Stanford University, for instance, will require incoming students to take a course in "creative expression" as part of its new general-education curriculum. Students at Carnegie Mellon University's ­Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences must satisfy a "creating" requirement, in which they produce a painting, poem, musical performance, piece of technology, or design an experiment or mathematical proof. And Bryant University requires students to take a first-year seminar in design thinking.

 

Adrian College, in Michigan, started an Institute for Creativity to weave the subject into the curriculum. The University of Kansas and the City University of New York recently adopted new general-education requirements that students in all disciplines take a course to develop their creative skills.

One of the earliest and most pervasive efforts is at the University of Kentucky, which started in the fall of 2011 to require its undergraduates, who number more than 20,000, to take a three-credit course in creativity.

The goal in developing students' creative skills, say these institutions, is to train them to look at familiar problems or sets of data and view them from a fresh perspective.

 

The global pace of change makes creative capacities essential, says Robert J. Sternberg, a professor of psychology and provost at Oklahoma State University, where the Institute for Creativity and Innovation trains faculty members in teaching creativity and sponsors a campuswide creativity challenge.

 

"How is our society going to compete in a global economy if we're teaching students how to adapt to yesterday's world or to today's world?" asks Mr. Sternberg, who studies creativity. "We're going to be left behind in the dust."

 

To skeptics, who sometimes include students and taxpayers, the notion of teaching creativity conjures images of classrooms full of students laboring in front of easels in a misguided attempt to become the next Picasso. Such assumptions bear little resemblance to what colleges are attempting.

 

Creativity is not synonymous with art or beauty. The value is in "the thought process itself," says Thomas R. Fisher, a professor of architecture and dean of the College of Design at the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, and an expert in design thinking. Such patterns of thinking train people to use metaphor and analogy to reframe problems, break them down to component parts to view them from different perspectives, and work iteratively—that is, revising again and again—to find answers.

 

The approach can apply to any discipline, he says. "We want to create more creative businesspeople, engineers, and mathematicians."

Creativity, when conceived of as a thought process rather than an inherent attribute or talent, has theoretical roots in psychology and philosophy.

J.P. Guilford, the psychologist, drew a distinction between two forms of thinking, convergent and divergent. With its frequent use of standardized tests, education today tends to skew heavily toward convergent thinking, which emphasizes the importance of arriving at a single correct answer.

 

Divergent thinking, however, requires coming up with alternative theories and ideas, sometimes many of them, to produce a useful solution.

 

Guilford devised tests of divergent thinking, including one in which the test taker invents as many uses as possible for a paper clip. Children typically clobber adults on this test, says Mr. Fisher.

 

"Humans are naturally playful, creative beings," he says. "We're doing something to kids in grade school that drums the creativity out of them."

 

The philosophical antecedents harken to the late 19th and early 20th centuries, when Charles Sanders Peirce, the American pragmatist, drew on the forms of inductive and deductive logic categorized by Aristotle in his Prior Analytics. Peirce added a third strain of logic, which he often called abductive.

 

Each has its advantages. Deductive reasoning confers a high degree of certainty in its conclusions. Inductive logic works well when data are readily observable. Abductive logic, Peirce posited, relies on inference to make creative leaps in situations in which information is incomplete. It yields a large number of possible answers.

 

The emphasis in the curriculum on Peirce's and Guilford's ideas is particularly notable given the current context. Colleges are weathering criticism that they fail to prepare students to be productive citizens and effective employees. Traditional humanistic disciplines must continually justify their relevance. The rising cost of college is adding urgency to the popular perception that colleges' main task is to train students in practical skills that will enable them to get jobs.

 

Practically focused programs in business have been among the first to embrace creativity and design thinking in their curricula. Such efforts typically serve these programs' efforts to teach entrepreneurship and innovation, which are thought to spark new businesses, create jobs, and stimulate the economy.

 

Established companies understand the value of creativity, too. IBM surveyed 1,500 chief executives in 33 industries around the world in 2010 to gauge how much they valued characteristics like creativity, integrity, management discipline, rigor, and vision in an increasingly volatile, complex, and interconnected world. Creativity topped the list.

The appreciation for creativity is also growing despite lingering cultural baggage. For many, the belief persists that creativity is a rare gift given to a select few. According to this view, artists and creative thinkers are lone geniuses with innate talent who must rely on flashes of inspiration that arrive without warning. These "myths" are ultimately destructive, says R. Keith Sawyer, an associate professor of education at Washington University in St. Louis who studies creativity and learning.

 

"It's a matter of hard work, and a lot of it, and consistently engaging in practices that help you come up with good ideas," he says. "It's a series of small sparks over a long period of time."

 

Creativity courses at the University of Kentucky try several ways to produce those sparks.

 

The university's creativity requirement came about when its previous general-education curriculum was being revised, dropping from 45 required credits to 30 in four thematic areas.

 

The arts-and-creativity requirement is part of a 12-credit "intellectual inquiry" cluster that also includes one course in the physical and natural sciences, or mathematics; one in a social science; and one in the humanities.

 

Rather than confine the creativity requirement to arts courses, Kentucky welcomed proposals across a range of disciplines, says Benjamin C. Withers, a professor of art history and interim associate provost for undergraduate education.

 

He shepherded the new creativity requirement into being, and says the decision to allow different types of courses to fulfill the requirement bolstered faculty members' support for the idea.

 

The decision also acknowledged that creativity takes many forms, Mr. Withers says, and can be as applicable to the natural, physical, and social sciences as any other discipline. Kentucky students can satisfy their creativity requirement in an art, dance, music, or theater course. Or they can take one in chemical engineering, geography, or landscape architecture.