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How a Radical New Teaching Method Could Unleash a Generation of Geniuses

How a Radical New Teaching Method Could Unleash a Generation of Geniuses | Education | Scoop.it
Students in Matamoros, Mexico weren't getting much out of school -- until a radical new teaching method unlocked their potential.

 

Mitra’s work has roots in educational practices dating back to Socrates. Theorists from Johann Heinrich Pestalozzi to Jean Piaget and Maria Montessori have argued that students should learn by playing and following their curiosity.

 

Einstein spent a year at a Pestalozzi-inspired school in the mid-1890s, and he later credited it with giving him the freedom to begin his first thought experiments on the theory of relativity.

 

Google founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin similarly claim that their Montessori schooling imbued them with a spirit of independence and creativity.

 


Via Gust MEES, Lynnette Van Dyke
Daniella Broomberg's insight:

I really enjoyed this article. Finally a postivive slant on education that provides teachers with a way of improving and changing the way they interact with students. I wholeheartedly agree with the notion that as the world changes and expects different qualities and skills from students, so too must the education system reform. 

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Steph's Journalism Group 2013's curator insight, October 15, 2013 10:46 AM
Daniella Broomberg's insight:

I really enjoyed this article. Finally a postivive slant on education that provides teachers with a way of improving and changing the way they interact with students. I wholeheartedly agree with the notion that as the world changes and expects different qualities and skills from students, so too must the education system reform. 

Karla Luetzow's curator insight, October 16, 2013 11:22 AM

 

The main focus of this article is discovering the most effective way to learn. In Mexico, a school José Urbina López Primary School 

 changed their curriculum and allowed children the freedom to explore and learn on their own. The new curriculum was modeled after Sugata Mitra’s “school in the cloud.” In today’s age of constant information, “school in the cloud” challenged if a computer can teach students as well as a teacher.

 

I found this article incredibly intriguing. The model of education has been the same since the 1800’s. A teacher instructs a classroom of pupils with routine tests to analyze  each student's progress. I have heard of online high schools and college classes, but the idea that seven year olds can learn on their own astonishes me. I never even thought of changing the standard teacher-student classroom in elementary school.  Replacing a teacher with a computer is an extraordinary idea for the future. It is very difficult to imagine. However, our society is changing with this new technology. Therefore, it makes sense to me that our education system should change along with it.

 

Most people would agree that it is easier to learn material that one finds interesting. The type of learning in this article plays into this strength. I wonder if this type of learning would work in an area with distractions such as television, video games, and cell phones. I would be interested to see if the outcome would show the same positive results. I do not think it would. 

 

 This article ties in with the TedTalk by Sugata Mitra. To further learn about this type of learning, I suggest watching the video

 

 http://www.npr.org/2013/06/21/179015266/how-much-can-children-teach-themselves

 

AnnKatherine Brito's curator insight, April 3, 2014 11:59 AM

Students in control of their own education. This is amazing! Will this revolutionize education?

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Rescooped by Daniella Broomberg from 21st Century skills of critical and creative thinking
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How a Radical New Teaching Method Could Unleash a Generation of Geniuses

How a Radical New Teaching Method Could Unleash a Generation of Geniuses | Education | Scoop.it
Students in Matamoros, Mexico weren't getting much out of school -- until a radical new teaching method unlocked their potential.

 

Mitra’s work has roots in educational practices dating back to Socrates. Theorists from Johann Heinrich Pestalozzi to Jean Piaget and Maria Montessori have argued that students should learn by playing and following their curiosity.

 

Einstein spent a year at a Pestalozzi-inspired school in the mid-1890s, and he later credited it with giving him the freedom to begin his first thought experiments on the theory of relativity.

 

Google founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin similarly claim that their Montessori schooling imbued them with a spirit of independence and creativity.

 


Via Gust MEES, Lynnette Van Dyke
Daniella Broomberg's insight:

I really enjoyed this article. Finally a postivive slant on education that provides teachers with a way of improving and changing the way they interact with students. I wholeheartedly agree with the notion that as the world changes and expects different qualities and skills from students, so too must the education system reform. 

more...
Steph's Journalism Group 2013's curator insight, October 15, 2013 10:46 AM
Daniella Broomberg's insight:

I really enjoyed this article. Finally a postivive slant on education that provides teachers with a way of improving and changing the way they interact with students. I wholeheartedly agree with the notion that as the world changes and expects different qualities and skills from students, so too must the education system reform. 

Karla Luetzow's curator insight, October 16, 2013 11:22 AM

 

The main focus of this article is discovering the most effective way to learn. In Mexico, a school José Urbina López Primary School 

 changed their curriculum and allowed children the freedom to explore and learn on their own. The new curriculum was modeled after Sugata Mitra’s “school in the cloud.” In today’s age of constant information, “school in the cloud” challenged if a computer can teach students as well as a teacher.

 

I found this article incredibly intriguing. The model of education has been the same since the 1800’s. A teacher instructs a classroom of pupils with routine tests to analyze  each student's progress. I have heard of online high schools and college classes, but the idea that seven year olds can learn on their own astonishes me. I never even thought of changing the standard teacher-student classroom in elementary school.  Replacing a teacher with a computer is an extraordinary idea for the future. It is very difficult to imagine. However, our society is changing with this new technology. Therefore, it makes sense to me that our education system should change along with it.

 

Most people would agree that it is easier to learn material that one finds interesting. The type of learning in this article plays into this strength. I wonder if this type of learning would work in an area with distractions such as television, video games, and cell phones. I would be interested to see if the outcome would show the same positive results. I do not think it would. 

 

 This article ties in with the TedTalk by Sugata Mitra. To further learn about this type of learning, I suggest watching the video

 

 http://www.npr.org/2013/06/21/179015266/how-much-can-children-teach-themselves

 

AnnKatherine Brito's curator insight, April 3, 2014 11:59 AM

Students in control of their own education. This is amazing! Will this revolutionize education?

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Apple Launches Apps for Teachers Category

Apple Launches Apps for Teachers Category | Education | Scoop.it
In recognition of the widespread use of iPad sin schools and general education, Apple recently released a new Apps for Teachers category in the App Store.…

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
Daniella Broomberg's insight:

The new section on the App store dedicated purely to teaching is an adequate reflection of how technology and education have become integrated. I think these apps can be useful as teaching aids but should not be relied upon too heavily or replace teacher-student interaction.

 

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Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.'s curator insight, October 16, 2013 9:19 PM

Apples is moving forward with the iPad teacher resources.

Rachael Jones's curator insight, October 17, 2013 9:36 PM

Thank you Apple!

Selin Gelinci's curator insight, October 31, 2013 8:54 AM

This resource gave me quick insight on the app's that i could download for the future on the ipads. It was beneficial to me because as technology is very popular in regards to education in the 21st century, it is useful to have read this website and explore further into things that were launched by Apple in order to help teachers with their teaching with the use of ipads. 

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In defiance of schooling stereotypes

In defiance of schooling stereotypes | Education | Scoop.it

So-called 'struggling' schools that nevertheless succeed convey lessons we need to understand.

 

I have spent the past year on a journey around South Africa, chronicling the stories of 19 disadvantaged but top-performing schools across the country —from the barren Northern Cape to the green hills of the Eastern Cape and densely populated townships. Through my camera, I attempted to understand what makes these schools work as well as they do.

On this journey, I have met committed principals such as Phadiela Cooper, Bonginkosi Maphanga and Linda Molefe; dedicated teachers such as Sherron Mukwevho, Scara Nkosi and Rere Tlou; and determined pupils such as Andile Makhowana, Prince Kobedi and Lebogang Mgwanya. 

They opened up to me and my camera, shared their stories and moved me as they also pushed me to reflect on my own perceptions.


Via Andrew van Zyl
Daniella Broomberg's insight:

Schools That Work is a video series that looks at 19 schools across South Africa that are defying the odds by achieving academic success while serving some of the country's most disadvantaged students. The videos seek to understand and highlight what these schools, and in particular, their leadership, are doing differently. The hope is that these videos can help to educate and inspire other principals and promote school change. The project was commissioned by Jonathan Jansen, Vice Chancellor at the University of the Free State. The videos are being produced and directed by filmmaker Molly Blank.


In this article, Molly Blank discusses her experiences while filming Schools that Work. What I gathered from her is that strong leadership and pupil determination and willingness to get involved is essential to success. 


It's a nice change to see a perspective of the South African education crisis through a different lens. It is equally important to address the positive as it is the negative.


I personally believe that a pass rate of 35% as stated by the government is too low. Not only does it encourage compliance and poor student performance but it closes off oppurtunities to access tertiary education and for students to become active participants in their communities by furthering their education.

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Steph's Journalism Group 2013's curator insight, October 6, 2013 10:13 AM
Daniella Broomberg's insight:

Schools That Work is a video series that looks at 19 schools across South Africa that are defying the odds by achieving academic success while serving some of the country's most disadvantaged students. The videos seek to understand and highlight what these schools, and in particular, their leadership, are doing differently. The hope is that these videos can help to educate and inspire other principals and promote school change. The project was commissioned by Jonathan Jansen, Vice Chancellor at the University of the Free State. The videos are being produced and directed by filmmaker Molly Blank.

 

In this article, Molly Blank discusses her experiences while filming Schools that Work. What I gathered from her is that strong leadership and pupil determination and willingness to get involved is essential to success. 

 

It's a nice change to see a perspective of the South African education crisis through a different lens. It is equally important to address the positive as it is the negative.

 

I personally believe that a pass rate of 35% as stated by the government is too low. Not only does it encourage compliance and poor student performance but it closes off oppurtunities to access tertiary education and for students to become active participants in their communities by furthering their education.

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Privatisation of schools vs the public good

Privatisation of schools vs the public good | Education | Scoop.it

 

Public education has developed over more than a century to become a core part of the work of governments, especially because it is very much a part of their democratising mandate in providing a basic human right to all members of society. Nowhere is there an example of a country with high educational outcomes where the provision of basic education has been in private hands.

But there is now an increasingly insistent view suggesting that the privatisation of education, whether through high-cost or low-cost private schooling, charter schools or the voucher system, is the "solution" to the problems of education systems.

This view is touted against the egregious weaknesses that face many public education systems and the prevailing view that education is not meeting the demands of the labour market and economy.


Via Andrew van Zyl
Daniella Broomberg's insight:

AN interesting oerspective that discusses the advocation of privatising education.

 

Advocates of pivate education believe that although education is  a basic human right that should be accesible by all people, the state should have as little to do with education as possible. This belief is reinforced by gross public misuse of funds by government (particularly in South Africa), underqualified teachers paid by the state, and generally poor educational infrastructure that the state should be accountable for.

 

Personally, I do not believe that privatisation of education is the answer to South Africa's education crisis. The majority of our country (those who truly need education) are too poor to afford it. A national private education system would project education as a commodity to be bought and sold in a highly compeditive market. This would perpetuate already stark disparities in education between rich and poor. Poor indivuiduals would recieve no education in place of low-quality education.

 

Privatisation of education is not the answer. The answer is free education that maintains norms and standars across racial, economic and language barriers. The question is, how can this be achieved?

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Time for radical change in education [South Africa]

Time for radical change in education [South Africa] | Education | Scoop.it

[...] Fourth, academics need to rise above the parapets of the ivory towers of teaching and learning. Academia ought to lead the charge in proposing radical change to both content and process of teaching and learning. Why are African languages dying on our watch? Why are our children being denied the wonders of African history, culture and literature?

Why are innovation and experimentation not promoted in our education system from early childhood to tertiary levels? [...]


Via Reitumetse, Firoze Manji
Daniella Broomberg's insight:

 Mamphela Ramphele is brilliant.

 

In this article she addresses our education crisis in 5 points and provides solutions that can be accomplished through active participations.

 

Ramphele outlines the following problems:

1. A lack of accountability and a culture of impunity in governement

2. Poor policy coherence and implementation

3. The habit of the private sector to act as complacent spectators

4. Academic elitism

5. A low level of proffessionalism in teachers

 

Ramphele addresses each problem with a viable solution, her outlook is positive and embracing. Such an attituide should be seen more in discussions of education in South Africa. I believe she addresses the crucial issues of South African education. The solutions she provides are logical and doable. 

 

She encourages active leadership at all levels, an embracing attituide towards IT infused learning and a focus on African tradition, language and culture. 

 

I wholeheartedly agree that in order to transend the past, our education system must be ACTIVE and INNOVATIVE.

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Steph's Journalism Group 2013's curator insight, October 6, 2013 8:58 AM
Daniella Broomberg's insight:

 Mamphela Ramphele is brilliant.

 

In this article she addresses our education crisis in 5 points and provides solutions that can be accomplished through active participations.

 

Ramphele outlines the following problems:

1. A lack of accountability and a culture of impunity in governement

2. Poor policy coherence and implementation

3. The habit of the private sector to act as complacent spectators

4. Academic elitism

5. A low level of proffessionalism in teachers

 

Ramphele addresses each problem with a viable solution, her outlook is positive and embracing. Such an attituide should be seen more in discussions of education in South Africa. I believe she addresses the crucial issues of South African education. The solutions she provides are logical and doable. 

 

She encourages active leadership at all levels, an embracing attituide towards IT infused learning and a focus on African tradition, language and culture. 

 

I wholeheartedly agree that in order to transend the past, our education system must be ACTIVE and INNOVATIVE

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Not even colonial born: England, the English and the problem of education in South Africa by Jonathan Jansen

Not even colonial born: England, the English and the problem of education in South Africa by Jonathan Jansen | Education | Scoop.it

Jonathan Jansen delivers the 2013 English Academy’s Percy Baneshik Memorial Lecture at the UFS campus.


"In his speech Not even colonial born: England, the English and the problem of education in South Africa,' Prof Jansen addressed the dilemma of the politics of language in both school and university education today.

Talking about the dominance of English in schools, Prof Jansen said it is the language of choice because indigenous languages are so poorly taught. "Simply learning in your mother tongue is absolutely no guarantee of improved learning gains in school. The problem is not the language of instruction; it is the quality of teaching, the knowledge of curriculum and the stability of the school."

Prof Jansen told the audience in the CR Swart Hall that Afrikaans-exclusive, or even Afrikaans-dominant white schools represent a serious threat to race relations in South Africa. "You simply cannot prepare young people for dealing with the scars of our violent past without creating optimal opportunities in the educational environment for living and learning together."


Via Andrew van Zyl
Daniella Broomberg's insight:

Prof Jansen offers an interesting perspective that strips down the problem of education in South Africa to the issue of language. He believes there are disparities between those who are fluent in English and those who speak indigenous languages. In order to achieve an inclusive democracy, Prof Jansen believes the issued behind the use of English as a medium of instruction need to be openly discussed. I agree with his belief that English is suitable as a medium of instruction but in order to secure its success, it must be incorporated in learning as early as possible. It is also essential that our education system produces competetent citizens that can 'speak-back' in a variety of languages. 

 

It seems to me, like the introduction of English as a national medium of instruction will offer great benefits if offered correctly but must address many disparities in order to do so. Moreover, I strongly agree with Prof Jansen's notion that our education crisis is rooted in a low quality of teaching, not in the language of instruction.

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Andrew van Zyl's curator insight, October 4, 2013 3:06 AM

Here is the full text of the "lecture that caused all the trouble" kindly reprinted by Rapport. UFS itself has provided the full text here as well, if you want a nice Word doc version.

Steph's Journalism Group 2013's curator insight, October 6, 2013 8:59 AM
Daniella Broomberg's insight:

Prof Jansen offers an interesting perspective that strips down the problem of education in South Africa to the issue of language. He believes there are disparities between those who are fluent in English and those who speak indigenous languages. In order to achieve an inclusive democracy, Prof Jansen believes the issued behind the use of English as a medium of instruction need to be openly discussed. I agree with his belief that English is suitable as a medium of instruction but in order to secure its success, it must be incorporated in learning as early as possible. It is also essential that our education system produces competetent citizens that can 'speak-back' in a variety of languages. 

 

It seems to me, like the introduction of English as a national medium of instruction will offer great benefits if offered correctly but must address many disparities in order to do so. Moreover, I strongly agree with Prof Jansen's notion that our education crisis is rooted in a low quality of teaching, not in the language of instruction.

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The future of education in Africa is mobile

The future of education in Africa is mobile | Education | Scoop.it
United Nation’s mobile learning specialist Steve Vosloo argues phones could be the future of education on the continent.

Via Reitumetse
Daniella Broomberg's insight:

I'm not sure that SA is ready to make the leap into technologically centered learning when we lack so many basic resources. Surely we need to focus on the bare minimum first, working the bottom up?

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Basic Education Minister Angie Motshekga Will Not Tolerate Violence in Schools - AllAfrica.com

Basic Education Minister Angie Motshekga Will Not Tolerate Violence in Schools - AllAfrica.com | Education | Scoop.it
Independent Online
Basic Education Minister Angie Motshekga Will Not Tolerate Violence in Schools
AllAfrica.com
There are a number of policies in place that form part of the South African Schools Act which must be implemented at a provincial level.

Via Reitumetse
Daniella Broomberg's insight:

In light of the recent violence in Glen Vista, Motshekga issues a statement that advocates a zero tolerance approach to violence in schools. She enourages students, parents and teachers to be active contributors towards peaceful education.

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Reitumetse's curator insight, September 25, 2013 3:20 AM

Lets make education, thereby schools an societal issue

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Why girls’ education can help eradicate poverty

Why girls’ education can help eradicate poverty | Education | Scoop.it
Education is linked to the age at which women marry and have children. In sub-Saharan Africa and in South and West Asia, child marriage affects one in eight girls; one in seven gives birth by the age of 17.

 

Providing girls with a quality education also equips them with the confidence to confront people in power and challenge the inequalities that still exist for girls and women worldwide. Consider Mariam Khalique, a teacher in Pakistan who has used education to build her female students’ confidence and to encourage them to stand up for their rights.

 

One of her pupils was the young education activist Malala Yousafzai, whose global advocacy work is proof of the transformative power of quality schooling.

 


Via Gust MEES
Daniella Broomberg's insight:

Education is so deeply rooted in every sphere of society. This article reflects the importance of education particularly for woman. Education is vital in order to be truly liberal and free. Healthy, safe and autonomous women are key to a successfully functioning democratic society.

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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's comment, May 10, 2014 4:30 PM
I totally agree.
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's comment, May 10, 2014 4:30 PM
I totally agree.
Deborah Leddon's curator insight, November 24, 2014 10:13 PM

One of the biggest moral imperatives of our times - ensure the education of every girl on the planet.. the rewards are boundless.

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New study reveals most important skills for students

New study reveals most important skills for students | Education | Scoop.it
Research indicates Microsoft Office applications rank 3 of 20 top in demand skills for high-growth, high-pay careers.

Via Gust MEES
Daniella Broomberg's insight:

Interestingly, this articel does highlight the mportance of technological skills but emphasizes that 'soft skills' like communication  are equally important to hireability. It is important that students do not base their education on a technological knowledge that may not neccecarily guarentee them a job in the future. The education system needs to be integrated between soft and hard skills that teach students how to interact successfully with technology AND people.

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Gust MEES's curator insight, October 15, 2013 9:24 AM

 

The only software package called out within the top 20 skills across all occupations is Microsoft Office, explicitly required in 15 percent of high-growth, high-salary positions. Microsoft Office is No. 3 on the list of skills most required, and Microsoft PowerPoint and Word are No. 11 and No. 13 most required skills.


Steph's Journalism Group 2013's curator insight, October 15, 2013 10:46 AM
Daniella Broomberg's insight:

Interestingly, this articel does highlight the mportance of technological skills but emphasizes that 'soft skills' like communication  are equally important to hireability. It is important that students do not base their education on a technological knowledge that may not neccecarily guarentee them a job in the future. The education system needs to be integrated between soft and hard skills that teach students how to interact successfully with technology AND people.

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Criticism over math literacy in syllabus - IOL

Criticism over math literacy in syllabus - IOL | Education | Scoop.it

Top KwaZulu-Natal science teacher and principal Sibusiso Maseko has blasted the inclusion of mathematical literacy in the syllabus and criticised the province’s poor performance.

“As long as mathematical literacy is in the picture, our education results will continue to suffer. It negatively affects the real maths results, the inclusion of which is implying to children ‘you can’t pass, you are stupid’. This superficial passing of mathematical literacy must stop,” he said.


Via Mashudu
Daniella Broomberg's insight:

A common belief of many educationalists, including the widely respected Prof Jansen, is that mathamatical literacy should be completely removed from the syllabus. They believe it tells students that they do not have to pass maths because they can do maths literacy instead.

 

Comments such as the above may hold some truth but I personally believe that the poor national maths pass rate cannot be soley contributed to the existence of maths lit. In order to achieve in sectors such as maths and science, students and teachers need to work together and include innovative techniques in their learning methods. I maintain the belief that the existence of maths literacy has little to do with the declining pass rate. 

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Crisis in SA schools

Crisis in SA schools | Education | Scoop.it

Startling statistics show huge disparities between provinces when it comes to education.

 

Principal Bonginkosi Gumede is not keen to admit it, but he is all out of ideas. Too many girls in his rural KwaZulu-Natal school do not complete their education – and after eight years of trying various interventions, he now expects that to be the case this year, and the next, and probably the year after that.

"We have lots of girls who fall pregnant here," says Gumede. "Some drop out for six months, then they come back, but most do not come back. They become mothers, they stay at home, they never learn more."

In 2012, Gumede's school had 814 pupils. Seventy of them were pregnant during the year. Of those, 26 were under the age of consent, 16 years.


Via Andrew van Zyl
Daniella Broomberg's insight:

An interesting correlation between provinces, education and socio-economic conditions.

 

Statistics show that there are enormous disparities between the health and well-being of school children in differnet provinces. This reinstates a belief of mine that norms and standards must be implemented on a national level. Each province should look towards a target of educational standards, specefific to their provincial needs.

 

It's depressing to read these statistics, but the alternative of choosing ignorance is simply not an option.

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Brandon Yates's curator insight, October 1, 2013 5:56 AM

Some mind-blowing statistics on display here. It is really sad to see that a lot of girls in this rural KwaZulu-Natal school do not complete their education. Young girls who are pregnant(some below the age of cinsent) as well as a significant amount of young ladies who are dropping out after 6 months is quite disturbing and should be a major area of concern for the education department, especially if cases such as this are common amongst rural schools in Natal and throughout South Africa.

Steph's Journalism Group 2013's curator insight, October 6, 2013 10:13 AM
Daniella Broomberg's insight:

An interesting correlation between provinces, education and socio-economic conditions.

 

Statistics show that there are enormous disparities between the health and well-being of school children in differnet provinces. This reinstates a belief of mine that norms and standards must be implemented on a national level. Each province should look towards a target of educational standards, specefific to their provincial needs.

 

It's depressing to read these statistics, but the alternative of choosing ignorance is simply not an option.

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Innovation and Education: Young Serial Entrepreneur sets out to Transform South Africa’s Education System

Innovation and Education: Young Serial Entrepreneur sets out to Transform South Africa’s Education System | Education | Scoop.it
Coined by CNN.com as one of Africa’s Marissa Mayers, Rapelang Rabana is founding CEO of Yeigo Communications and ReKindle Learning. Yeigo is credited with creating ground-breaking applications and ...
Daniella Broomberg's insight:

 Rapelang Rabana is another strong believer that technology has a critical role to play in solving Africa's education problems. Rabana is the CEO of a company called ReKindle Learning.  


ReKindle Learning is an innovative technology-driven education company seeking to use and integrate the power of mobile and internet technology to improve and complement learning for students and corporate employees.


I like the idea to solve our education crisis with an increase or improvement in technology, but I'm not sure that this is a realistic or even a crucial goal. However, if implememnted correctly it could move towards active change. Still - I can't help feeling that their are other more desperate issues to attend to with regard to education. Teacher accountability, educational infrastructure and government policy to name but a few. 

 

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Steph's Journalism Group 2013's curator insight, October 6, 2013 8:58 AM
Daniella Broomberg's insight:

 Rapelang Rabana is another strong believer that technology has a critical role to play in solving Africa's education problems. Rabana is the CEO of a company called ReKindle Learning.  

 

ReKindle Learning is an innovative technology-driven education company seeking to use and integrate the power of mobile and internet technology to improve and complement learning for students and corporate employees.

 

I like the idea to solve our education crisis with an increase or improvement in technology, but I'm not sure that this is a realistic or even a crucial goal. However, if implememnted correctly it could move towards active change. Still - I can't help feeling that their are other more desperate issues to attend to with regard to education. Teacher accountability, educational infrastructure and government policy to name but a few. 

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Daily Maverick :: Neville Alexander - a linguistic revolutionary

Daily Maverick :: Neville Alexander - a linguistic revolutionary | Education | Scoop.it

He’s been a Robben Island prisoner and more recently one of South Africa’s most eminent educationists. He’s also a linguistic revolutionary.  KHADIJA PATEL lent Neville Alexander an ear. - Alexander is a vocal proponent of multilingualism in education. He acknowledges that his views on language are construed by some as the “idle musings of an out-of-touch eccentric”, but he believes the dominant opinions of multilingualism in education in South Africa suffer from the disposition to see everything through the prism of English. He is quick to clarify that it would be “silly” to be anti-English, but believes the role of South Africa’s African languages must be enhanced to ensure no South African is robbed of democracy.


Via Charles Tiayon
Daniella Broomberg's insight:

An interesting contrast to the opinion of Prof Jansen. The question of which (if any) national medium of instruction is needed in education. Prof Jansen believes English should be promoted to level the playing field. Neville Alexander disagrees.

 

Alexander believes that low levels of productivity and efficiency can be attributed to the way in which people are forced to communicate in languages they do not understand. Alexander believes South African's are in the habit of "seeing everything through the prism of English." I agree with this, but I am uncertain of how multilingual education will rectify English as a gloabal medium of communication.

 

Alexander believes that we are imprisoned by "neo-apartheid" language policies. In order to rectify this, he believes that English cannot be the de facto official language. He believes children should be taught African languages from a primary level of education in order to enhance South Africa's African languages.

 

The question on my mind, as communicated by Prof Jansen, is whether or not the language of instruction is as pertinent as the quality of teaching?

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Steph's Journalism Group 2013's curator insight, October 6, 2013 8:59 AM
Daniella Broomberg's insight:

An interesting contrast to the opinion of Prof Jansen. The question of which (if any) national medium of instruction is needed in education. Prof Jansen believes English should be promoted to level the playing field. Neville Alexander disagrees.

 

Alexander believes that low levels of productivity and efficiency can be attributed to the way in which people are forced to communicate in languages they do not understand. Alexander believes South African's are in the habit of "seeing everything through the prism of English." I agree with this, but I am uncertain of how multilingual education will rectify English as a gloabal medium of communication.

 

Alexander believes that we are imprisoned by "neo-apartheid" language policies. In order to rectify this, he believes that English cannot be the de facto official language. He believes children should be taught African languages from a primary level of education in order to enhance South Africa's African languages.

 

The question on my mind, as communicated by Prof Jansen, is whether or not the language of instruction is as pertinent as the quality of teaching?

Rescooped by Daniella Broomberg from Education in South Africa and Africa
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Time for radical change in education [South Africa]

Time for radical change in education [South Africa] | Education | Scoop.it

[...] Fourth, academics need to rise above the parapets of the ivory towers of teaching and learning. Academia ought to lead the charge in proposing radical change to both content and process of teaching and learning. Why are African languages dying on our watch? Why are our children being denied the wonders of African history, culture and literature?

Why are innovation and experimentation not promoted in our education system from early childhood to tertiary levels? [...]


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Daniella Broomberg's curator insight, October 6, 2013 8:30 AM

 Mamphela Ramphele is brilliant.

 

In this article she addresses our education crisis in 5 points and provides solutions that can be accomplished through active participations.

 

Ramphele outlines the following problems:

1. A lack of accountability and a culture of impunity in governement

2. Poor policy coherence and implementation

3. The habit of the private sector to act as complacent spectators

4. Academic elitism

5. A low level of proffessionalism in teachers

 

Ramphele addresses each problem with a viable solution, her outlook is positive and embracing. Such an attituide should be seen more in discussions of education in South Africa. I believe she addresses the crucial issues of South African education. The solutions she provides are logical and doable. 

 

She encourages active leadership at all levels, an embracing attituide towards IT infused learning and a focus on African tradition, language and culture. 

 

I wholeheartedly agree that in order to transend the past, our education system must be ACTIVE and INNOVATIVE.

Steph's Journalism Group 2013's curator insight, October 6, 2013 8:58 AM
Daniella Broomberg's insight:

 Mamphela Ramphele is brilliant.

 

In this article she addresses our education crisis in 5 points and provides solutions that can be accomplished through active participations.

 

Ramphele outlines the following problems:

1. A lack of accountability and a culture of impunity in governement

2. Poor policy coherence and implementation

3. The habit of the private sector to act as complacent spectators

4. Academic elitism

5. A low level of proffessionalism in teachers

 

Ramphele addresses each problem with a viable solution, her outlook is positive and embracing. Such an attituide should be seen more in discussions of education in South Africa. I believe she addresses the crucial issues of South African education. The solutions she provides are logical and doable. 

 

She encourages active leadership at all levels, an embracing attituide towards IT infused learning and a focus on African tradition, language and culture. 

 

I wholeheartedly agree that in order to transend the past, our education system must be ACTIVE and INNOVATIVE

Rescooped by Daniella Broomberg from Education in South Africa and Africa
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allAfrica.com: Africa: Universal Primary Education Is Not Enough

allAfrica.com: Africa: Universal Primary Education Is Not Enough | Education | Scoop.it
allAfrica: African news and information for a global audience...

Via Reitumetse
Daniella Broomberg's insight:

The issue of quality of education over quantity. It is one thing to successfully reach universal primary education, however, the quality of this education nedds to be monitored closely in order to meet a standard that renders it relevant.

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Children's reading shrinking due to apps, games and YouTube

Children's reading shrinking due to apps, games and YouTube | Education | Scoop.it
Nielsen Book data suggests that 32% of children read books every day, and 60% every week. But these percentages are falling as digital entertainment rises. By Stuart Dredge

Via John Evans
Daniella Broomberg's insight:

Pertinent to all the rage surrounding the use of technology in education. It seems that there are both negative and positive aspects. Children need to develop fine and gross motor skills that apps and ipads cannot always provide.

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Commission launches 'Opening up Education' to boost innovation and digital ... - EU News

Commission launches 'Opening up Education' to boost innovation and digital ... - EU News | Education | Scoop.it

More than 60% of nine year olds in the EU are in schools which are still not digitally equipped. The European Commission today unveils 'Opening up Education', an action plan to tackle this and other digital problems which are hampering schools and universities from delivering high quality education and the digital skills which 90% of jobs will require by 2020. To help kick-off the initiative, the Commission today launches a new website, Open Education Europa, which will allow students, practitioners and educational institutions to share free-to-use open educational resources.


Via jean lievens
Daniella Broomberg's insight:

This article provides an interesting persepective. While schools in Europe aim to bring technology into education, South Africa can barely provide students with a desk and chair. 

 

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