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[Fake World] Culture Beats Curriculum

[Fake World] Culture Beats Curriculum | Education | Scoop.it
a/k/a Worshipping The Real World
Here are three e-mails I received from three different people over the last three months. Spot the common theme.

Via Darren Burris
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Common Core: A Divisive Issue for Catholic School Parents Too - U.S. News & World Report

Common Core: A Divisive Issue for Catholic School Parents Too - U.S. News & World Report | Education | Scoop.it
U.S. News & World Report
Common Core: A Divisive Issue for Catholic School Parents Too
U.S.
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Defending GenY: Why Millennial-Bashers are Wrong

Defending GenY: Why Millennial-Bashers are Wrong | Education | Scoop.it
GenY has some negative stereotypes, but here’s why the GenY bashers are off their rockers.
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Common Core Communication Network: How Parents Can Help Their Kids

Common Core Communication Network: How Parents Can Help Their Kids | Education | Scoop.it

Common Core Communication Network - NSPRA http://t.co/QolLU6mVzV #ccss #edchatri


Via Darren Burris
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NY: Once racially troubled, a district shrinks the achievement gap | Hechinger Report

NY: Once racially troubled, a district shrinks the achievement gap | Hechinger Report | Education | Scoop.it

On a spring morning at Ossining High School in suburban New York, a group of students gathered in a small classroom at the end of the school’s science hallway. It was a day traditionally known to the senior class as “skip day,” when most of the school’s 12th-graders play hooky and head to the beach to celebrate their impending graduation.

 

But in the classroom shared by teachers Valerie Holmes and Angelo Piccirillo, a half dozen students had opted out of “skip day,” to spend the day in the science research room, putting finishing touches on projects and chatting with their teachers and classmates.

 

After struggling to attract students when it first launched in 1998, Ossining’s science research program was thriving by 2001. Last year, the Intel Corporation chose the program out of 18 national finalists to receive the top prize in a contest celebrating excellence in science instruction.

 

It is a notable award, but only one of many recent accomplishments at a school with a troubled history. At the same time it was building a nationally-recognized science program from scratch, Ossining High—once the site of race riots—has pioneered new strategies for reducing racial tensions, closing achievement gaps and increasing graduation rates. So far, all seem to be working.

 

Click headline to read more--

 


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Bryan Kay's curator insight, October 22, 2015 8:55 PM

I chose this resource to use for motivation or general ideas to become a better principal and educational leader.

 

It is important to be aware of achievement gaps and the reason for them. 

 

Leaders can support their teachers by providing resources and training to try and counter act these gaps. As a future leader I want to be accompanying and empathetic with situations while remaining steadfast to improve student's lives. 

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Achievement Gap Narrows on Long-Term NAEP

Achievement Gap Narrows on Long-Term NAEP | Education | Scoop.it

According to Education Week's Erik Robelen "The nation's 9- and 13-year-olds perform better in reading and math today than they did some 40 years ago, but that's not so for 17-year-olds."

 

"Overall, the nation’s 9-year-olds and 13-year-olds are better off academically today than they were in 1971 in reading, and in 1973 in math, the years when the long-term assessment was first administered, the results suggest. But for 17-year-olds, the average achievement levels are about the same when comparing 2012 data with results for the early 1970s in both subjects."


Via Mel Riddile
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Mel Riddile's curator insight, June 27, 2013 3:57 PM

1. Due to over testing, I don't trust international test scores for older students, particularly those in which the students never see the results. By the time they reach their senior year, students are tired of taking tests and never receiving feedback. 

2. We simply are not teaching in ways that will improve reading and math scores. In most schools, we continue to teach as though we were "sorting kids for success" instead of teaching as though we expected all students to be on the pathway to post-secondary education and training. 

3. Most math teachers are still teaching students to work math problems and not to apply math concepts to real-world situations using higher-order thinking while demonstrating logic and reasoning (writing).

4. The Common Core Standards stipulate that literacy is a "shared responsibility" across all content areas. Less than one percent of all high schools have or are attempting to implement a school wide literacy initiative. At one percent capacity, with little reading and almost no writing in high school, how can we possibly expect to see gains.

5. Our population is much more diverse than it was in 1971. Today, one in ten students nationwide speaks English as a second language. Graduation rates are at an all time high because we are keeping kids in school, who in 1971 would have dropped out and working in a low-skill factory job.


The Bottom Line:


The Common Core Standards, if properly implemented, should promote the kind of second-order culture change in our schools and classrooms that has been needed for a long time. I just hope that this is not a case of too little, too late.



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Catholic Schools deserve an authentically Catholic debate about Common Core

Catholic Schools deserve an authentically Catholic debate about Common Core | Education | Scoop.it
Two months ago, a group of Catholic university professors signed a letter urging Catholic bishops and diocesan school leaders to reject the Common Core. (RT @smarick: GREAT @kportermagee post re #CCSS & Catholic ed.

Via Darren Burris
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7 Myths About Rigor In The Classroom

7 Myths About Rigor In The Classroom | Education | Scoop.it
7 Myths About Rigor In The Classroom

Via Elaine J Roberts, Ph.D.
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Elaine J Roberts, Ph.D.'s curator insight, January 14, 2014 2:38 PM

From Barbara Blackburn, the author of Rigor is NOT a Four-Letter Word, a nice reminder of how educators (and parents) should be thinking about rigor and how it matters in the classroom.

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Harvard Education Letter: “Grit” and the New Character Education

Harvard Education Letter: “Grit” and the New Character Education | Education | Scoop.it

On a recent Monday, students in Jeff Thielman’s advisory at Cristo Rey Boston High School crowded into his crimson-walled office to take a test. These juniors, like their schoolmates, answered questions aimed not at measuring academic skills but at something that has captured educators’ attention lately: their grit.

The test—the 8-Item Grit Scale, developed by psychologist Angela Lee Duckworth at the University of Pennsylvania—asks respondents how they approach goals and handle setbacks and yields a Grit Score (on a scale of 1 to 5, with 5 as “grittiest”). It aims to assess character traits like resilience, self-control, and persistence—traits that research shows may matter more to academic performance than native intelligence.

The word “grit” risks being overused, but the suggestion that how students approach learning may be as critical as what they learn is resonating with educators. Consider it a quest for the “new” character education. This is not to dismiss teachings about moral and community values, but to frame, name, and share qualities hidden in plain sight, so-called performance character traits.


Via Lynnette Van Dyke
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How Educators Can Help Close the Achievement Gap With Simple Tactics | MindShift

How Educators Can Help Close the Achievement Gap With Simple Tactics | MindShift | Education | Scoop.it

"A new study from Stanford shows that a simple teaching tactic may help close the achievement gap between Latino American students and their white peers...The matter comes down to overcoming the negative effects of “stereotype threat,” a phenomenon that researchers have identified and documented over the last two decades. What they have found – in numerous studies – is that the stress and uncertain sense of belonging that can stem from being a member of a negatively stereotyped group undermines academic performance of minority students as compared with white students."


Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, February 25, 2013 8:41 PM

I rarely quote extensively from posts I have read, but in this case I am going to quote a section that appears in this post.
"Cohen and his colleagues have been looking for remedies to stereotype threat. In the first study described in the article, the researchers devised well-timed “values-affirmation” classroom assignments given to both Latino and white students as a part of the regular classroom curriculum. In one exercise, middle schoolers were given a list of values, such as “being good at art,” “being religious” and “having a sense of humor.” They were asked to pick the ones that were important to them and write a few sentences describing why. In a second exercise, they reflected in a more open-ended manner on things in their life that were important to them, and in a third they were guided to write a brief essay describing how the things they most consistently valued would be important to them in the coming spring.

Students completed several structured reflection exercises in their class throughout the year. The tasks were given at critical moments: the beginning of the school year; before tests; and near the holiday season, a period of stress for many people."

The post goes on to note that there was a control group and that there were significan differences between the two groups with the Latino students obtaining higher grades and that the effects of this affirmation exercise lasted for three years.

I posted an article about this a few weeks ago, but this article (which is actually a reprint of one published in the Stanford Graduate School of Education website) provides a more in-depth look at some of these studies. If you have a large Latino population in your school it is worth your time to check out this article.

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Closing the achievement gap in a high-poverty school

Closing the achievement gap in a high-poverty school | Education | Scoop.it
High poverty. High performing. These are two phrases that describe Hattie Watts Elementary today -- but it wasn’t always that way. When I became assista

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Kay Lehmann's curator insight, October 21, 2013 2:43 PM

Helping students in poverty succeed... Yes!

Terri Goldson's curator insight, January 3, 2014 7:33 PM

As an administrator of a diverse school where nearly 75% of the students receive free or reduced priced lunch, I can relate to Principal Fryou with regards to the challenges and joy of working in a high poverty school.  I have implemented many of the key elements she addresses in her article and our data reveals that we have made significant gains to close the achievement gap and as a result, our school is the highest performing school in the district. Although we are proud of the gains we have made, we have much more progress to make on our journey towards excellence.  My hope is that our progress and momentum for change is not ephemeral by the unfunded mandates of the Common Core Curriculum, SBACtesting, teacher evaluation process and a shrinking school and city budget. Only time will tell.