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Is SA’s education system the worst in Africa? Not according to the data - Africa Check

Is SA’s education system the worst in Africa? Not according to the data - Africa Check | Education | Scoop.it

South Africa’s former apartheid-era foreign affairs minister, Pik Botha, recently claimed that the country’s education system is the worst in Africa. How much does Botha know about education system rankings?

 

Very little it turns out. Data shows that while South Africa lags behind a number of African countries, there are many with worse education systems.
Via Andrew van Zyl
Brandon Yates's insight:

Sad to see that South Africa’s former apartheid-era foreign affairs minister, Pik Botha, recently claimed that the country’s education system is the worst in Africa. He clearly has no idea what he is talking about as this article shows that a recent study proves that that while South Africa lags behind a number of African countries, there are a few nations that are in a worse position than ourselves. That being said, we should strive to improve our education system as it is crucial to secure a bright future for SA!

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Failing indie schools face closure - Mpumalanga | IOL News | IOL.co.za

Failing indie schools face closure - Mpumalanga | IOL News | IOL.co.za | Education | Scoop.it
Nelspruit - Independent schools in Mpumalanga face closure if they fail to produce a matric pass rate of at least 50 percent for three years in a row, the province's education MEC has said.

Via Andrew van Zyl
Brandon Yates's insight:

Sad to see that a few schools in Mpumalanga are potentially facing closure due to the fact that they cannot produce a 50 percent matric pass rate on a consistent basis. While it is great to see education MEC Reginah Mhaule  getting involved, it does not seem like the best idea to close these schools down. Something should be done to assist these schools to reach the goals of the MEC.

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One Young World Summit 2013 Live

One Young World Summit 2013 Live | Education | Scoop.it

The One Young World Summit 2013 2-5 October

 

One Young World was founded in 2009 by David Jones and Kate Robertson. We are a London-based charity that gathers together young people from around the world, helping them make lasting connections to create positive change. 

We stage an annual Summit where the young delegates, backed by the One Young World Counsellors, debate and formulate solutions for the pressing issues the world faces. No youth-dominated event outside the Olympic Games brings together more countries than One Young World.


Via Andrew van Zyl
Brandon Yates's insight:

This seems like a great initiative created by these two individuals. Young people recieving advice from such powerful individuals should prove to be highly motivating. Education should be a key focus of nations like ours. This initiative is a fantastic example of South Africa taking the future of our youth seriously.

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Andrew van Zyl's curator insight, October 7, 2013 3:28 AM

The One Young World Summit was held in Johannesburg this year and included speakers such as Boris Becker, Jamie Oliver, Kofi Annan, Francois Pienaar and Bob Geldof. Seems the only person missing was Bono... :) In any case, you can watch the presentations on Youtube here.

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Pupil gets suspended for assaulting a teacher

September 20 -- Basic Education Minister Angie Motshekga says the Glenvista High School pupil who assaulted a teacher has crossed the line. The Grade 8 schoolboy was suspended, after the video showing the attack surfaced on Youtube


Via Andrew van Zyl
Brandon Yates's insight:

Truly disgusted by this story. It is shocking to see such a young student participating in such a gross, violent conduct against an educator. Due to the age of the pupil, I believe the responsibility for this boy's behaviour lies with his parents as well as the teachers at this school. Kids such as this boy should be taught proper conduct and how to express their frustration in a better manner. On the other hand, incidents such as this should not be accepted. I hope the boy was dealt with correctly!

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Courtney Dodge's comment, October 1, 2013 8:28 AM
This video is absolutely disgusting. They are considering only suspending him! I believe he deserves something much worse. Not only is it awful to treat a teacher like that but just another human being in general. Imagine if the situation was turned around and the teacher abused the child! The consequences would be far more severe
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Education system damaging pupils – rector - Cape Times | IOL.co.za

Education system damaging pupils – rector - Cape Times | IOL.co.za | Education | Scoop.it

Cape Town - The education system is damaging millions of bright young people, says Brian O’Connell, outgoing vice-chancellor and rector of the University of the Western Cape (UWC).

In an interview following the announcement of his departure, he said the system was making many of the same mistakes the apartheid government had made. O’Connell, 67, has been vice-chancellor and rector for more than a decade.


Via Andrew van Zyl
Brandon Yates's insight:

Interesting comments from Brian O’Connell, the outgoing vice-chancellor and rector of the University of the Western Cape (UWC). It's great to see that a few of the high-ranking members of top universities in the country really do care about the students at their universities so much so that they are willing to make bold statements that could put their own reputations on the line.

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2013-09-26 Google in Education South Africa Summit

2013-09-26 Google in Education South Africa Summit | Education | Scoop.it
The Google in Education South Africa Summit is a regional users summit at Parklands College in Cape Town on September 26 and 27, 2013.

Via Dorian Love
Brandon Yates's insight:

This is another great initiative that has been introduced into South Africa by Google. Google provides internet users with loads of free, innovative products that can greatly benefit schools in South Africa. It is vital that our young citizens are kept up to date with technological innovations and this summit will be an informative meeting for South African students and educators.

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South Africa: Nation Edges Up ICT Rankings | AllAfrica.com

 

South Africa climbed two places in the World Economic Forum's (WEF's) latest Global Information Technology Report, from 72nd to 70th out of 144 countries surveyed, scoring strongly for factors such as its regulatory, business and innovation environments, but poorly for other factors, particularly for quality of education.

 

South Africa was one of only two African countries that made the top half of the WEF's rankings, released on Wednesday, the other being Mauritius (55th). They were followed by Seychelles (79th), Egypt (80th), Cape Verde (81st), Rwanda (88th), Morocco (89th), Kenya (92nd) and Ghana (95th).

 

Continental powerhouse Nigeria languishes in 113th place in the report's "networked readiness index", which measures the capacity of each country's economy to leverage information and communication technology (ICT) for growth and well-being, based on a range of criteria.

 

The BRICS economies continue to lag in the WEF's rankings, "suggest[ing] that their rapid economic growth may be in jeopardy unless the right investments are made in ICT, skills and innovation," the report states.

 

Russia led the BRICS grouping in 54th place, followed by China (seven places down at 58th), Brazil (up five places to 60th), India (68th), and South Africa (70th).


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Brandon Yates's comment, September 17, 2013 5:48 AM
Some good news and some bad news with regards to education in South Africa. While it is good to see that we are climbing up the WEF's Global Info. Tech. Report, it is quite worrying to see that the quality of our education is ranked poorly. This is a key area that is indesperate need of improvement in this country. I firmly believe that in order for us to fully overcome the disasterous effect of the apartheid regime, it is crucial to provide quality education to all South African citizens, regardless of their financial situation. Our poor rating in the information and communication technology (ICT) sector is also worrying, as it is extremely important to ensure the youth of South Africa are tech-savy, as this skill set is the way forward for most career paths.
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Violence shuts South Africa schools

Violence shuts South Africa schools | Education | Scoop.it
A surge in gang violence leads education officials in South Africa's Western Cape province to close 16 schools for two days.

Via #BBBundyBlog #NOMORELIES Tom Woods #Activist Award #Scoopiteer >20,000 Sources >250K Connections http://goo.gl/ruHO3Q
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Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, August 15, 2013 4:43 PM

I am always saddened and stunned by the amount of violence that persists. It is a shame that people cannot resolve their differences and get what they need without resorting to violence which usually results in destruction and deaths.

Brandon Yates's comment, September 17, 2013 5:52 AM
It is incredibly disheartening to see that gang violence, which has for many years been a serious problem in the Western Cape, has now become such a problem that it is affecting the education of our nations youth. It is good to see that Provincial Premier Helen Zille has asked the national government to send in the army to help overwhelmed police. I am a great admirer of the work she does for this province and she has once again shown her initiative by coming up with a realistic solution to this drastic problem. Children and teachers should never have to fear going to school.
Sophie Charlotte Foster's curator insight, September 24, 2013 7:25 AM

Violence in schools appears to be an increasing problem in South Africa. It is unbelievable to realize that violence is affecting schools as it disrupts the already problematic educational systems in the country. The presence of the National Guard in the areas which are affected by the gang violence and shoot outs will be beneficial in preventing future fatalities which are unnecessary and tragic. The temporary closure of schools will negatively affect academic syllabi and the completion of essential school work in order to prepare scholars properly for examinations. Helen Zille’s role in assisting the police with stopping the actions of criminals is encouraging as there is awareness within government that there is a vital problem with regards to insufficient protection of citizens.

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Library brings community together

September 14 -- Langa Township in the Western Cape has a proud reputation of being an anti-apartheid hotspot. And while residents have endured a tough life because of discrimination, there's been one thing that's kept young and old together - a library that's proudly celebrating 70 years.


Via Andrew van Zyl
Brandon Yates's insight:

Great to see that the residents of this Township respect and celebrate this library! While it is no secret that life for Township citizens is not easy, this library seems to have done plenty of good work in terms of bringing a community together in the name of reading and education!

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Disabled Rights group take on lack of specialist schools

Published on Sep 29, 2013

KwaZulu-Natal - September 29 - Aspiring social worker Musa Chili, and the Disabled People's Organisation, are launching a campaign to improve the conditions for disabled people in rural areas.


Via Andrew van Zyl
Brandon Yates's insight:

Positive to see a niche demograph in this country standing up for their rights. It must be incredibly difficult for disabled people to live normal lives on a daily basis, yet alone in rural areas. The conditions for disabled people in rural areas should be improved as a result of this campaign and will most likely also result in national awareness of the conditions of disabled people in this country.

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Thousands march over alleged racism at Heidelberg school

Thousands march over alleged racism at Heidelberg school | Education | Scoop.it

 

In a march that disrupted learning in Ratanda schools on Monday, local leaders of the ANC and its alliance partners took turns accusing the Afrikaans-medium Heidelberg Hoër Volkskool of promoting racism against black pupils.

"I know we'll be labelled racists as well, but the truth is we're responding to racism," Archie Mokonane of the South African Communist Party (SACP) told the crowd.

Sipho Nhlengethwa, a local ANC councillor, said they would campaign for the school to be named after Obed Nkosi, the party's anti-apartheid stalwart from Ratanda. "This is our public school, it's not a private school," said Nhlengethwa.


Via Andrew van Zyl
Brandon Yates's insight:

Very scary to think that racism is still a problem in South African schools. When learners have a variety of demands that they need to attend to on a daily basis, dealig with racism should definitely not be one of them. If the allegations are true, I hope that the guilty parties are dealt with harshly! Hats off to the local ANC leaders standing up for the affected pupils.

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Crisis in SA schools

Crisis in SA schools | Education | Scoop.it

Startling statistics show huge disparities between provinces when it comes to education.

 

Principal Bonginkosi Gumede is not keen to admit it, but he is all out of ideas. Too many girls in his rural KwaZulu-Natal school do not complete their education – and after eight years of trying various interventions, he now expects that to be the case this year, and the next, and probably the year after that.

"We have lots of girls who fall pregnant here," says Gumede. "Some drop out for six months, then they come back, but most do not come back. They become mothers, they stay at home, they never learn more."

In 2012, Gumede's school had 814 pupils. Seventy of them were pregnant during the year. Of those, 26 were under the age of consent, 16 years.


Via Andrew van Zyl
Brandon Yates's insight:

Some mind-blowing statistics on display here. It is really sad to see that a lot of girls in this rural KwaZulu-Natal school do not complete their education. Young girls who are pregnant(some below the age of cinsent) as well as a significant amount of young ladies who are dropping out after 6 months is quite disturbing and should be a major area of concern for the education department, especially if cases such as this are common amongst rural schools in Natal and throughout South Africa.

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Daniella Broomberg's curator insight, October 6, 2013 9:49 AM

An interesting correlation between provinces, education and socio-economic conditions.

 

Statistics show that there are enormous disparities between the health and well-being of school children in differnet provinces. This reinstates a belief of mine that norms and standards must be implemented on a national level. Each province should look towards a target of educational standards, specefific to their provincial needs.

 

It's depressing to read these statistics, but the alternative of choosing ignorance is simply not an option.

Steph's Journalism Group 2013's curator insight, October 6, 2013 10:13 AM
Daniella Broomberg's insight:

An interesting correlation between provinces, education and socio-economic conditions.

 

Statistics show that there are enormous disparities between the health and well-being of school children in differnet provinces. This reinstates a belief of mine that norms and standards must be implemented on a national level. Each province should look towards a target of educational standards, specefific to their provincial needs.

 

It's depressing to read these statistics, but the alternative of choosing ignorance is simply not an option.

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E-learning in 2013: Open knowledge

E-learning in 2013: Open knowledge | Education | Scoop.it
The increased availability of shared, open knowledge is a trend in e-learning that could make a great impact on the way technology in education is approached in South Africa in 2013 and beyond.

Via SAQA News Update
Brandon Yates's insight:

E-learning is something that has taken the world by storm, particularly in nations that have vast amounts of people that cannot afford any forms of education. E-learning provides people with shared, open knowledge that will allow people who cannot affored tertiary education the chance to recieve that level of education, for free, online. edX is the company that is making this possible. Students who complete edX courses receive "certificates of mastery" but don't qualify with degrees or diplomas. This is, however, a positive step forward in education, and can greatly benefit students in South Africa and other countries who cannot afford to attend university.

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Improving Education in the Rural Areas - AllAfrica.com

Improving Education in the Rural Areas - AllAfrica.com | Education | Scoop.it
Improving Education in the Rural Areas
AllAfrica.com
South Africa: Improving Education in the Rural Areas. 17 August 2013. press release.

Via Marie Schoeman
Brandon Yates's insight:

This is fantastic! It is really encouraging to see that the Department of Education is taking steps like this to improve education in the rural areas of KwaZulu-Natal. The opening of this new school that has all of the key features needed is a positive step forward by the department. I hope that initiatives like this continue to take shape around the country as education is the way forward for this nation.

 

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Deadly Stampede Highlights Problems With South African Universities

Deadly Stampede Highlights Problems With South African Universities | Education | Scoop.it
A stampede to register for limited slots at a Johannesburg university this week resulted in one death and dozens of injuries. The tragedy has resulted in intense attention on South Africa’s higher education system and its many problems.

Via Charles Tiayon
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Brandon Yates's comment, September 17, 2013 5:59 AM
I cannot believe that this happened on our shores. Higher education institutions such as UJ should set an example to the people who wish to attend the university, and their late walk-in application policy certainly does not do this. It encourages prospective students to leave things to the last minute and has resulted in a tragedy that should never have been allowed to become a reality. While this is an incredibly sad story, it is good to hear that government will centralize applications for universities and colleges, and will not permit late walk-in applications. this will ensure that something like this won't take place again, and will also ensure that people who really wish to attend university will do so because of the set cut-off date.