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Rescooped by Ana Galac from Transmediation
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transmediation and the digital humanities

"Digital tools, technologies, and spaces have, in many ways, radically transformed the ways in which humanities scholars do their work. In other ways, however, digital tools, technologies, spaces haven’t yet had much of an impact.

In this web site, we specifically explore transmediation--the ways in which a media piece migrates from one medium to another (and thus perhaps from one audience to another, one context to another, and one purpose to another).

Each node on this web site presents a case of transmediation--with an introduction to the media piece; a summary and analysis of related media pieces; a discussion of what this case can tell us about transmediation; and links to examples, other materials, and/or citations."


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Rescooped by Ana Galac from Transmediation
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Transmediation | Multimodality

Transmediation | Multimodality | Education | Scoop.it
Kress (2010) introduces the concept of transduction, also referred to as transmediation by Siegel (1995), which means translating an idea from one mode to another mode.

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Transmediation as a Tool for English Language Learners to Access Academic Discourse « NSSE

Transmediation as a Tool for English Language Learners to Access Academic Discourse « NSSE | Education | Scoop.it

Link to PDF.

Over the last several years, calls have been made for the inclusion of multimodal forms of literacy in classrooms (Bamford, 2007), where multimodal can be defined as referring to texts that combine more than one medium (e.g., textual and visual). As adolescents are increasingly interested in visual and hypertextual modes, research has placed the value of multimodality on promoting student motivation. Work on multimodality takes as its impetus the reality that students are living in an increasingly visual culture, which calls for different kinds of literacy skills to function effectively in contemporary society. Though this is undoubtedly true, teachers of English language learners (ELLs) may be less attentive to these issues and more concerned with helping adolescent ELLs acquire the academic discourse necessary for success in U.S. schools (Bartolomé, 1998; Valdés, 2001). There has been a dearth of studies exploring the potential and actual merit of multimodal texts in increasing students’ access to culturally valued forms of academic literacy. Those that have addressed this issue have focused on the concept of transmediation, or the process of translating complex ideas from one form (visual) into another (textual). This paper explores the field of multimodal literacy and offers examples of transmediation that may increase adolescent ELLs’ access to academic discourse.


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Rereading the Signs: Multimodal Transformations in the Field of Literacy Education - Marjorie Siegel

Rereading the Signs: Multimodal Transformations in the Field of Literacy Education - Marjorie Siegel | Education | Scoop.it

Historical look at transmediation inn the literacy field.


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Rescooped by Ana Galac from Transmediation
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Between the By-Road and the Main Road: Transmediation in Action: Drawing, Talking, Listening and Performing to Comprehend Literature

Between the By-Road and the Main Road: Transmediation in Action: Drawing, Talking, Listening and Performing to Comprehend Literature | Education | Scoop.it

In order to facilitate comprehension of poetry, I engage students in a drawing activity to enhance their understanding of Paul Laurence Dunbar’s poem, “The Haunted Oak” and to ready them to read Marilyn Nelson's A Wreath for Emmett Till. To facilitate the drawing, I distribute an 11” x 17” sheet of white paper and a drawing pencil to each student. I then ask students to fold the sheet to make 8 equal size boxes. I already had divided the stanzas to Dunbar poem into eight sections and will use a PowerPoint to display each section. I explain to the students that I will show the PowerPoint slides and read aloud the stanza or stanzas from the poem and that they should quickly sketch what they image in one of the boxes. I remind them that goal here is not to create stunning art, but rather to try as quickly as possible to represent what they visualize. I model this process on large posted sheets of paper with a marker for the first stanza and invite students to work along. We then work through the whole poem: I project the words, read them aloud, and students and I each make drawings. My drawings remain public. In total, each of us makes 8 drawings...


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Deepening Literacy Learning/Chapter 1: Opening Possibility Through Transmediation

Deepening Literacy Learning/Chapter 1: Opening Possibility Through Transmediation | Education | Scoop.it

In google Scholar: Chpater 1 from Deepening Literacy. Here I chronicle classroom-based work that illustrates transmediation.


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Reading Online - New Literacies: Transmediation as a Metaphor for New Literacies in Multimedia

Reading Online - New Literacies: Transmediation as a Metaphor for New Literacies in Multimedia | Education | Scoop.it
an invited article for the New Literacies department of the e-journal Reading Online...

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Rescooped by Ana Galac from Transmediation
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Reading Online - New Literacies: Transmediation as a Metaphor for New Literacies in Multimedia

Reading Online - New Literacies: Transmediation as a Metaphor for New Literacies in Multimedia | Education | Scoop.it
an invited article for the New Literacies department of the e-journal Reading Online...

Via Mary Ann Reilly
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