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Open Colleges Presents Your Brain Map: 84 Strategies for Accelerated Learning

Open Colleges Presents Your Brain Map: 84 Strategies for Accelerated Learning | Educating in a digital world | Scoop.it
Explore the Open College's interactive brain map to learn about how your brain functions and ways to improve your learning.

Via Beth Dichter
Mary Cunningham's insight:

Brains are fascinating - view this map to learn more!

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Cindy Riley Klages's curator insight, October 25, 2013 9:14 PM

Love this visual and its explanations~

Ante Lauc's curator insight, October 26, 2013 3:48 AM

I will try follow it!

Melissa Jenkins 's curator insight, November 16, 2013 9:11 AM

Especially helpful in science and health classes

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Learning and the Brain- A few quick facts

Learning and the Brain- A few quick facts | Educating in a digital world | Scoop.it
What do we and don't we know about the brain? It used to be that we thought we knew it all. Well, maybe not all. But, over the last couple decades new research reveals and debunks some of our previ...

Via Beth Dichter
Mary Cunningham's insight:

This is part of the post on infographics as well, but is interesting enough to have a link just in its own.

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, October 11, 2013 8:59 PM

One image with six facts about learning and the brain. As educators these are six facts that are useful to know as we work with our students.

Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, October 12, 2013 1:56 AM

Thanks for this valuable reference.

Γιώργος Παπαναστασίου's curator insight, October 12, 2013 4:52 AM

Η γνωστική ψυχολογία και οι νευροεπιστήμες έχουν αναδείξει τη σημασία των γνωστικών και μεταγνωστικών δεξιοτήτων  που λαμβάνουν μέρος στην μνήμη εργασίας, στην πορεία για τη  μάθηση.

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Why is Storytelling so Powerful? A Look at What it does to our Brain

Why is Storytelling so Powerful? A Look at What it does to our Brain | Educating in a digital world | Scoop.it
Storytelling is one of the most overused and underused techniques at the same time. In this post, we are revealing what storytelling does to our brains.

Long before we had writing as we know it there has been an oral tradition of storytelling. This post looks at the science around storytelling.

Learn about how a story "can put your whole brain to work" and why "our brains become more active when we tell stories." Find out why the brain "learns to ignore certain overused words and phrases" and much more. If you enjoy telling stories, writing stories, or listening to stories check out this post to learn more!

 


Via Beth Dichter
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Roy Sheneman, PhD's curator insight, July 10, 2013 5:22 PM

Excellent!

44Doors's curator insight, March 11, 2014 10:27 AM

"Anything you’ve experienced, you can get others to experience the same. Or at least, get their brain areas that you’ve activated that way, active too:"

 

"use simple, yet heartfelt language."

"Quick last fact: Our brain learns to ignore certain overused words and phrases that used to make stories awesome"

Art Jones's curator insight, October 28, 2014 5:50 PM

"our brains become more active when we tell stories."

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5 Teaching Strategies To Keep Students From Turning Off Their Brains

5 Teaching Strategies To Keep Students From Turning Off Their Brains | Educating in a digital world | Scoop.it

"Dr. Judy Willis–resident brain investigator at Edutopia and TeachThought–is a neurologist turned educator whose work...focuses on the brain–how it works, and how teachers can respond."


Via Beth Dichter
Mary Cunningham's insight:

This would be great to use in conjunction with the video from HOW YOUTH LEARN 

http://youtu.be/p_BskcXTqpM

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, October 16, 2013 8:06 PM

This post looks at five strategies to help students keep their brains turned on. You can also watch a video where Dr. Willis discusses "how boredom and fear cause students to literally switch their brains off." Below are two of the five items shared:

* Promote curiosity not as a thing, but the thing

* Use indirect signals rather than "telling"

You might also want to check out the post "Five Learning Strategies That Make Students Curious" located at

http://www.teachthought.com/learning/5-learning-strategies-that-make-students-curious/

Ra's curator insight, October 20, 2013 4:33 PM

Familiar ground but good to revisit with student teachers. Link to formative assement for clarity of purpose in planning.

Fran Bozarth's curator insight, October 27, 2014 7:29 PM

The article goes on to elaborate a bit on each of these.  Good basics.

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For Teenage Brains, the Importance of Continuing to Learn Deeply

For Teenage Brains, the Importance of Continuing to Learn Deeply | Educating in a digital world | Scoop.it
It used to be that neuroscientists thought smart people were all alike. But now they think that some very smart people retain the ability to learn rapidly, like a child, well into adolescence.

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, September 24, 2013 9:21 PM

Why do children learn languages more quickly than adults? When does this ability to learn rapidly change? This post looks at recent research, specifically "the interplay between your genetic inheritance and how you learn from the environment"

The research focused on how children learn and notes that in childhood "the brain is especially responsive to learning." As we grow into adolescence this "hyperlearning mode" does seem to end, and therefore learning seems to be harder.
But the research also shows that children with higher IQs tend to have a brain that stays more in the "hyperlearning mode." The last line of the post states "Even if you’re a teenager, it might not be too late to start learning Chinese, chess or the cello."

For additional information please click through to the post.